Taking The Next Step

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Nicholas P.'s Comment
member avatar

Hello all I am new here but this forum has been a wealth of knowledge since I began my career in trucking. I farmed for many years until family issues put an end to that but I I have had my CDLs since I was 18 because of the use of semis on the farm. Fast forward three years and I have worked for a few companies and have 3 years of experience but since I'm from a small area the pay is a little on the low side. I currently do food service distribution now it's pretty tough work but nothing to bad but I'm trying to save and pay down some bills and start a family and 900 a week is not cutting it. I have all my endorsements hazmat and twic. Also zero tickets and mvr is spotless I drove jockey trucks at the port of Savannah for a little while not sure how that adds to real experience. Sorry for the long winded introduction but my question is this I see a lot of people talking about 1500-2000 a week in trucking how realistic is that? i thought about going to the oilfields since driving semis on rough dirt roads is something I know well. I've heard to good to be true stories and some nightmares so I was just going to get some advise from y'all. Would relocating to the oilfields be worth it in the long run or is there another option I'm not thinking of? I appreciate any help and opinions

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

MVR:

Motor Vehicle Record

An MVR is a report of your driving history, as reported from your state Department of Motor Vehicles. Information on this report may include Drivers License information, point history, violations, convictions, and license status on your driving record.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

Bruce K.'s Comment
member avatar

Nick, good questions. I don't know much about oil field work, except the saying "Keep going and you won't get stuck. " That was when I lived in an oil producing area. I'm still in my first year of driving and I'm on pace to take home 40 to 50 thousand during my first year. Next year my goal is to take home $60,000 if I can continue to drive economically and safely.

Now I have a question for you. Being a farm boy, do you think your background made you better at backing a semi? I like to talk to drivers who I observe backing with great skill. Many of these good backers came from farm or agricultural backgrounds.

Kerry L.'s Comment
member avatar

Hello all I am new here but this forum has been a wealth of knowledge since I began my career in trucking. I farmed for many years until family issues put an end to that but I I have had my CDLs since I was 18 because of the use of semis on the farm. Fast forward three years and I have worked for a few companies and have 3 years of experience but since I'm from a small area the pay is a little on the low side. I currently do food service distribution now it's pretty tough work but nothing to bad but I'm trying to save and pay down some bills and start a family and 900 a week is not cutting it. I have all my endorsements hazmat and twic. Also zero tickets and mvr is spotless I drove jockey trucks at the port of Savannah for a little while not sure how that adds to real experience. Sorry for the long winded introduction but my question is this I see a lot of people talking about 1500-2000 a week in trucking how realistic is that? i thought about going to the oilfields since driving semis on rough dirt roads is something I know well. I've heard to good to be true stories and some nightmares so I was just going to get some advise from y'all. Would relocating to the oilfields be worth it in the long run or is there another option I'm not thinking of? I appreciate any help and opinions

Hello Nicholas,

With those endorsements and TWIC , intermodal and/or linehaul work could provide a substantial bump in pay. Also, relocation might be something to consider. The cities of Houston and Dallas are excellent areas for trucking, especially linehaul/intermodal work. I am not a driver, but my information gathering brain that has soaked up quite a bit in the past 18 months says that you should definitely be making more than $900/week with Hazmat, tanker, and TWIC. One company to consider is Schneider and also JB Hunt. Both are pretty big in Texas with intermodal hauling. In the next few days, I will be posting more suggestions. Fill out the applications online, then wait a day or two and call with a follow up.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Intermodal:

Transporting freight using two or more transportation modes. An example would be freight that is moved by truck from the shipper's dock to the rail yard, then placed on a train to the next rail yard, and finally returned to a truck for delivery to the receiving customer.

In trucking when you hear someone refer to an intermodal job they're normally talking about hauling shipping containers to and from the shipyards and railyards.

MVR:

Motor Vehicle Record

An MVR is a report of your driving history, as reported from your state Department of Motor Vehicles. Information on this report may include Drivers License information, point history, violations, convictions, and license status on your driving record.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Kerry L.'s Comment
member avatar

Petroleum Transport advertises that they have a new guaranteed pay system at $1750 to $2100 per week. Might be worth talking to a recruiter there to find out the particulars.

NFI hires for intermodal and drayage.

HubGroup exclusively hauls intermodal.

Swift has an intermodal division.

Intermodal:

Transporting freight using two or more transportation modes. An example would be freight that is moved by truck from the shipper's dock to the rail yard, then placed on a train to the next rail yard, and finally returned to a truck for delivery to the receiving customer.

In trucking when you hear someone refer to an intermodal job they're normally talking about hauling shipping containers to and from the shipyards and railyards.

Anne A. (G13Momcat)'s Comment
member avatar

Petroleum Transport advertises that they have a new guaranteed pay system at $1750 to $2100 per week. Might be worth talking to a recruiter there to find out the particulars.

NFI hires for intermodal and drayage.

HubGroup exclusively hauls intermodal.

Swift has an intermodal division.

And don't forget, Johnnie Bryan !!!!

~ A ~

Great suggestions, Kerry . . . just 'horsin' around. (Well, actually PackRat was, earlier today!!!) Haha!

Intermodal:

Transporting freight using two or more transportation modes. An example would be freight that is moved by truck from the shipper's dock to the rail yard, then placed on a train to the next rail yard, and finally returned to a truck for delivery to the receiving customer.

In trucking when you hear someone refer to an intermodal job they're normally talking about hauling shipping containers to and from the shipyards and railyards.

Bruce K.'s Comment
member avatar

Just keep in mind that those big numbers are for very experienced drivers. Rookies will not make $1700+ per week. It takes time, effort and a great driving record to reach the high numbers. Companies put those big numbers out there, but be suspicious if you are a beginner and you are told you can make that number. It may take 1,2,3 years or more to get there.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Anne A. (G13Momcat)'s Comment
member avatar

Just keep in mind that those big numbers are for very experienced drivers. Rookies will not make $1700+ per week. It takes time, effort and a great driving record to reach the high numbers. Companies put those big numbers out there, but be suspicious if you are a beginner and you are told you can make that number. It may take 1,2,3 years or more to get there.

True, very true.. HowEVER, Johnnie Bryan stock is WAY low.. and the powers that BE, are blaming the trucking companies. They are even offering a $5K sign on, and ONLINE orientation, atm!!

Personally, get a job as a Longshoreman .. for now!! ;)

The Port Problem ISN'T for lack of Truckers . . .

~ Anne ~

ps: Anyone know who Johnnie Bryan even IS ?!?!? (Well, okay ... new guys!)

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Anne A. (G13Momcat)'s Comment
member avatar

Petroleum Transport advertises that they have a new guaranteed pay system at $1750 to $2100 per week. Might be worth talking to a recruiter there to find out the particulars.

NFI hires for intermodal and drayage.

HubGroup exclusively hauls intermodal.

Swift has an intermodal division.

Pretty good research; read my above posted article, too!!

~ Anne ~

ps: to the OP . . . omigosh ~ Oilfields are SOOOOOOO unpredictable. Including pay. I got a really good guy on with a company about 5 years ago; he's still OTR same place. (And can actually WASH his clothes and truck!)

Okay . . . it's Melton. Flatbed, so 'still' a bit dirty. In similar wheelhouse; he's 37 now!

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Intermodal:

Transporting freight using two or more transportation modes. An example would be freight that is moved by truck from the shipper's dock to the rail yard, then placed on a train to the next rail yard, and finally returned to a truck for delivery to the receiving customer.

In trucking when you hear someone refer to an intermodal job they're normally talking about hauling shipping containers to and from the shipyards and railyards.

Kerry L.'s Comment
member avatar

Just keep in mind that those big numbers are for very experienced drivers. Rookies will not make $1700+ per week. It takes time, effort and a great driving record to reach the high numbers. Companies put those big numbers out there, but be suspicious if you are a beginner and you are told you can make that number. It may take 1,2,3 years or more to get there.

OP has 3 years of experience, so I think past rookie stage.

Not all freight types require half a decade of experience to get into really good paychecks. Line haul , intermodal , and fuel hauling all pay extremely well here in Texas and the majority of companies hiring for such work require 2 years of experience.

Line Haul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Intermodal:

Transporting freight using two or more transportation modes. An example would be freight that is moved by truck from the shipper's dock to the rail yard, then placed on a train to the next rail yard, and finally returned to a truck for delivery to the receiving customer.

In trucking when you hear someone refer to an intermodal job they're normally talking about hauling shipping containers to and from the shipyards and railyards.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Kerry L.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

Petroleum Transport advertises that they have a new guaranteed pay system at $1750 to $2100 per week. Might be worth talking to a recruiter there to find out the particulars.

NFI hires for intermodal and drayage.

HubGroup exclusively hauls intermodal.

Swift has an intermodal division.

double-quotes-end.png

Pretty good research; read my above posted article, too!!

~ Anne ~

ps: to the OP . . . omigosh ~ Oilfields are SOOOOOOO unpredictable. Including pay. I got a really good guy on with a company about 5 years ago; he's still OTR same place. (And can actually WASH his clothes and truck!)

Okay . . . it's Melton. Flatbed, so 'still' a bit dirty. In similar wheelhouse; he's 37 now!

You are a wealth of knowledge. Much appreciated.

Checking out that article now.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Intermodal:

Transporting freight using two or more transportation modes. An example would be freight that is moved by truck from the shipper's dock to the rail yard, then placed on a train to the next rail yard, and finally returned to a truck for delivery to the receiving customer.

In trucking when you hear someone refer to an intermodal job they're normally talking about hauling shipping containers to and from the shipyards and railyards.

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