Dutch Maid Logistics -- Orientation/Training

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Kerry L.'s Comment
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I started the application process with Dutch Maid Logistics while outside the US and continued it upon re-entry into the US. The entire process was very smooth and easy. It probably would have been even easier if not for Thanksgiving coming up soon after returning.

On 11/28/2021, I head to the airport to catch my morning flight. They normally arrange Greyhound or Amtrak, but that the timing of the bus ride for me coming from Texas was problematic, so my recruiter arranged a flight. Flew from DFW to Detroit then Detroit to Columbus, OH. Flight from Detroit was delayed almost 2 hours due to the plane being delayed at its origin before landing in Detroit. But, thankfully it was just a delay and not a cancellation. Arrived at Columbus and I was trying to arrange a Lyft ride from Columbus, OH to Willard, OH, but couldn't get a driver to accept my ride request. Tried Uber and gave up because Uber wouldn't let me update my contact information. I ended up catching a taxi. Recruiter told me that I would be reimbursed for the ride when she told me that I would have to arrange a ride to the hotel from the airport. I paid cash for the taxi ride ($170 for 1:35 ride, which was reduced from the $191 that the meter read) and forgot to get a receipt from the driver. Let this be a lesson learned to make sure to get and keep all receipts. I don't know if I will still be able to be reimbursed, but I am expecting not.

I got into the hotel at around 18:00. The place is an older hotel, but it is nice enough and sufficient. A continental breakfast is provided by the hotel. (For those who are wondering, continental breakfast consists of food that requires little to no preparation. There is a small kitchen from which room service can be ordered. I have no idea what this food is like. The prices are equivalent to fast food restaurants.

Dutch Maid Logistics does urinalysis and hair follicle drug screen, for those who are wanting to know. The first day was a repeat of things learned in CDL school, which I really appreciate because it has been 18 months since obtaining my license. Both drug screens conducted today. There are 8 of us in orientation, 5 of us being new drivers, 2 are new mechanics, and 1 a new 3rd shift dispatcher. Our orientation conductor said that this is a much larger than normal group, which is partly because the company is adding 20 new trucks to the fleet.

Training is 200 hours minimum for drivers with no experience. Training can be extended either by request of the trainee or by recommendation of the trainer. It was emphasized several times that this is a training company, but they also pride themselves on the fact that this is a company that many drivers choose to stay with them for years. Typical turnover is due to home situation requiring drivers to be home more often. Current turnover is about 50%, equating to about 1 driver per week lost. Orientation is 3 days long.

I hope that I haven't forgotten anything. I probably have, so ask any questions, if you want to know something that I forgot to mention.

~Kerry

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Kandyman's Comment
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Good luck man. I hope Dutch Maid will be a good fit for you. Keep us posted.

Kerry L.'s Comment
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Good luck man. I hope Dutch Maid will be a good fit for you. Keep us posted.

It definitely feels like a good fit so far.

TwoSides11's Comment
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Good luck Kerry!

Kerry L.'s Comment
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Day 2 orientation:

Something that I forgot to mention that I learned on the first day is that with the new regulation going into effect next year concerning CDL training, Dutch Maid Logistics has plans to open its own school before the new regulation takes effect. I don't know any particulars other than it will be a certified training program.

Today we continued watching videos that are a rehash of what I learned in CDL school. No complaints because that was 18 months ago. Definitely nice to have the information refreshed.

Dutch Maid Logistics is very big into teaching the Smith System for defensive driving. Jeff, the head of training at DML, said that he can't formally teach the Smith System, but he and the trainers will provide us with the information to be able to use the parts that will benefit us most as drivers.

Up next tomorrow...

1) Videos of what happens when distracted driving in a CMV.

2) In a truck on the road and Smith System principles.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

CMV:

Commercial Motor Vehicle

A CMV is a vehicle that is used as part of a business, is involved in interstate commerce, and may fit any of these descriptions:

  • Weighs 10,001 pounds or more
  • Has a gross vehicle weight rating or gross combination weight rating of 10,001 pounds or more
  • Is designed or used to transport 16 or more passengers (including the driver) not for compensation
  • Is designed or used to transport 9 or more passengers (including the driver) for compensation
  • Is transporting hazardous materials in a quantity requiring placards

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Kerry L.'s Comment
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Something else that I forgot...

Dutch Maid Logistics offers 3 days off for 11 days out. I will be on a little bit different schedule, at least when I want to take home time in Dallas. It will be more like 6-8 weeks out at a time. I will have to figure out as I go how much time at home I will be allowed/want to take at a time. Truthfully, I had already had the mentality that I want to stay out that long before taking home time. I don't have any expectation of being a super trucker who drives 600 miles/day straight off my trainers truck. I will do what I can while being out for weeks at a time until I have my stamina built up and see what kind of weekly miles I feel most comfortable driving.

Jeff has told us that this company has drivers who run as little as 1500 miles/week and perfectly happy running that. He said that there are also drivers averaging well over 3000 miles/week and do so by choice. Basically, the company will accommodate how individual drivers like to run and dispatchers plan the loads for various drivers based on those tendencies. Time will tell the type of driver that I ultimately end up choosing to be.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Anne A. (G13Momcat)'s Comment
member avatar

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Good luck man. I hope Dutch Maid will be a good fit for you. Keep us posted.

double-quotes-end.png

It definitely feels like a good fit so far.

You KNOW I'm following, good sir.

Glad it's working out for ya. Extremely excited 4u!

ps: If you see a FAB Express rig tomorrow around or after 4 pm next door (almost!) at Pepperidge Farms, shout a HOWDY to Tom!! Either truck # 1213 or #2010 depending on weight. One's single screw; other's twin!!

~ Anne ~

dancing-dog.gif good-luck.gif dancing-dog.gif

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Kerry L.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

Good luck man. I hope Dutch Maid will be a good fit for you. Keep us posted.

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

It definitely feels like a good fit so far.

double-quotes-end.png

You KNOW I'm following, good sir.

Glad it's working out for ya. Extremely excited 4u!

ps: If you see a FAB Express rig tomorrow around or after 4 pm next door (almost!) at Pepperidge Farms, shout a HOWDY to Tom!! Either truck # 1213 or #2010 depending on weight. One's single screw; other's twin!!

~ Anne ~

dancing-dog.gif good-luck.gif dancing-dog.gif

I will try to keep my eye out, but will not lie that I may forget.sorry.gif

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Kerry L.'s Comment
member avatar

Day 3 orientation:

We started the day with videos of Dutch Maid Logistics drivers who had been in wrecks or near-misses due to distracted driving. Some of the videos were quite humbling. I won't go into details because I don't want to glorify that part of what happens in transportation.

Went to lunch at Golden Corral. After lunch, we observed training manager utilizing Smith System principles while driving a Suburban. 5 of us new hires took turns illustrating that we are capable of making use of Smith System principles. We all performed very well, with each of us illustrating obvious strengths and each of us showing areas where improvement is needed. No one showed a problem with being capable of implementing the Smith System principles.

Orientation is now complete. Directed to call in tomorrow between 9:00 and 9:30 to be informed of timing to get on truck with our respective trainers. We were told that trainees are always out on a truck with a trainer within a day or two. No concerns for waiting an extended period of time for a trainer, as has been shared by many a trainee with other companies.

I want to mention that a conversation with the training manager came up about how to deal with having a difficult situation with a trainer. He told us that if there is ANY reason that we would like to be with a different trainer, contact him and let him know. He told us to never feel like we have to stick with a situation where we feel like we are not getting what we need out of training. He said to most especially let him know if it's something where we feel unsafe in any way. I then asked if asking for another trainer would ever cause the company to look negatively at a trainee. The absolute and clear answer is no. Each trainer has a different style and approach, so being with more than one trainer can only have positive benefits for a trainee.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Kerry L.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

Good luck man. I hope Dutch Maid will be a good fit for you. Keep us posted.

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

It definitely feels like a good fit so far.

double-quotes-end.png

You KNOW I'm following, good sir.

Glad it's working out for ya. Extremely excited 4u!

ps: If you see a FAB Express rig tomorrow around or after 4 pm next door (almost!) at Pepperidge Farms, shout a HOWDY to Tom!! Either truck # 1213 or #2010 depending on weight. One's single screw; other's twin!!

~ Anne ~

dancing-dog.gif good-luck.gif dancing-dog.gif

I forgot to include in my most recent orientation update that we did not get to the DML terminal until around 17:00. I didn't see his truck as we were pulling in.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

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