Amazon Driver Tired Of The Grind, Looking To Change

Topic 31169 | Page 1

Page 1 of 1
's Comment
member avatar

Hey all,

I currently work for a Amazon DSP. It's not technicaly Amazon, but it might as well be. I work on the XL side, driving a box truck. I forget the exact length, but I want to say from nose to end is 40 feet (or so I'm told, I'm not super sure).

We hustle and work really hard, for little pay. I'll be honest with y'all, I make 17.50 an hour. Drivers here for 2 years make 19 an hour. We load our own packages out, pre and post trip inspection, secure our own cargo, etc. We have to be DOT fit to drive the trucks, but we don't have to have a CDL.

I'm seriously thinking about getting my CDL from a local school. My question is, how much different is driving a tractor and trailer then driving a large box truck?

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Trucker Chris (CK)'s Comment
member avatar

Welcome! You mentioned going to a local CDL school, but I have to ask, why would you pay for something you can get for free? There are many large companies that offer free CDL training and paid on-the-job training with a contracted term, usually about one year.

I drive for Prime Inc, we are a large refrigerated carrier, but also run flatbed and tanker divisions. I got my CDL through Prime in 3 weeks, drove team with a trainer for 30,000 miles, and have been driving solo and as a trainer since the end of May 2019. After you get your CDL and are officially hired, we pay our trainees and guaranteed $900 every week until they finish training and get their own truck.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Kerry L.'s Comment
member avatar

Hey all,

I currently work for a Amazon DSP. It's not technicaly Amazon, but it might as well be. I work on the XL side, driving a box truck. I forget the exact length, but I want to say from nose to end is 40 feet (or so I'm told, I'm not super sure).

We hustle and work really hard, for little pay. I'll be honest with y'all, I make 17.50 an hour. Drivers here for 2 years make 19 an hour. We load our own packages out, pre and post trip inspection, secure our own cargo, etc. We have to be DOT fit to drive the trucks, but we don't have to have a CDL.

I'm seriously thinking about getting my CDL from a local school. My question is, how much different is driving a tractor and trailer then driving a large box truck?

Welcome to TT,

I worked for G&K Services/Cintas for just short of 2 years where I backed 26' box trucks (total length roughly 40'). I went to a CDL school and earned my CDL. I went through a brief training period with a company right out of CDL school. My experience is obviously not extensive, but I have enough exposure to both trucks to be confident in telling you that the differences between operating the two trucks is enormous. In fact, you won't be viewed by any company hiring you just the same as someone coming in who has driven nothing but a passenger vehicle.

Similarities between operating a box truck and combination vehicle:

Use of mirrors in performing maneuvers.

Use of Get Out And Look.

Going slow and being safe.

Differences in operating the two vehicles:

The differences are quite numerous. It would take me a while to identify them and I would probably forget many.

I went into trucking school thinking that my experience backing box trucks would be helpful. The only thing that was helpful is that when I had moments that I struggled in CDL school, I reminded myself that I learned to back box trucks with 0 experience before starting to learn on the job. My suggestion would be to not think that any of the skills are translatable other than using mirrors and getting out to look.

Here are some links to check out on the site:

Paid CDL Training Programs

Apply For Paid CDL Training

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Combination Vehicle:

A vehicle with two separate parts - the power unit (tractor) and the trailer. Tractor-trailers are considered combination vehicles.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

25 posts, no name, and no status....?

confused.gif

Trucker Chris (CK)'s Comment
member avatar

25 posts, no name, and no status....?

confused.gif

Glitch?

Kerry L.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

Hey all,

I currently work for a Amazon DSP. It's not technicaly Amazon, but it might as well be. I work on the XL side, driving a box truck. I forget the exact length, but I want to say from nose to end is 40 feet (or so I'm told, I'm not super sure).

We hustle and work really hard, for little pay. I'll be honest with y'all, I make 17.50 an hour. Drivers here for 2 years make 19 an hour. We load our own packages out, pre and post trip inspection, secure our own cargo, etc. We have to be DOT fit to drive the trucks, but we don't have to have a CDL.

I'm seriously thinking about getting my CDL from a local school. My question is, how much different is driving a tractor and trailer then driving a large box truck?

double-quotes-end.png

Welcome to TT,

I worked for G&K Services/Cintas for just short of 2 years where I backed 26' box trucks (total length roughly 40'). I went to a CDL school and earned my CDL. I went through a brief training period with a company right out of CDL school. My experience is obviously not extensive, but I have enough exposure to both trucks to be confident in telling you that the differences between operating the two trucks is enormous. In fact, you won't be viewed by any company hiring you just the same as someone coming in who has driven nothing but a passenger vehicle.

Similarities between operating a box truck and combination vehicle:

Use of mirrors in performing maneuvers.

Use of Get Out And Look.

Going slow and being safe.

Differences in operating the two vehicles:

The differences are quite numerous. It would take me a while to identify them and I would probably forget many.

I went into trucking school thinking that my experience backing box trucks would be helpful. The only thing that was helpful is that when I had moments that I struggled in CDL school, I reminded myself that I learned to back box trucks with 0 experience before starting to learn on the job. My suggestion would be to not think that any of the skills are translatable other than using mirrors and getting out to look.

Here are some links to check out on the site:

Paid CDL Training Programs

Apply For Paid CDL Training

Correction:

You will be viewed by any company hiring you just the same as someone coming in who has driven nothing but a passenger vehicle.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Combination Vehicle:

A vehicle with two separate parts - the power unit (tractor) and the trailer. Tractor-trailers are considered combination vehicles.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Page 1 of 1

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More