Which Truck Driving Schools Specifically Train You On Automatic?

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Anne A. (and sometimes To's Comment
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Long Island, Nassau County here, too! Actually, born in Jamaica Queens, raised in East Meadow. My dad was a Radiologist at Nassau Couty Hospital, and Meadowbrook.

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Did your dad work at NCMC?

I'm born in Jamaica as well.

Yep!! My dad's family ran his deli in Queens ! It was called "Frank's Deli" ... of course :)

~ Anne ~

Small world, we trucker peeps live in, eh?

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
George B.'s Comment
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Born in Rockville Centre, lived in Massapequa and Amityville.

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

Anne A. (and sometimes To's Comment
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Born in Rockville Centre, lived in Massapequa and Amityville.

Smalllllll world! My sister lived at 52 Park Avenue, in Amityville !! Wow ! I've been to ALL those 3 !

~ Anne ~

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Zach 's Comment
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Andrea, put manuals out of your thinking. If a school doesn’t train you on AMT (Auto Mated Transmission, aka ‘auto’, just move on to training that does. The vast majority of training trucks will be AMT.

I trained on manual exclusively and have driven manual vehicles since I first started. When I was issued my first truck, I got an AMT. I would never go back to manual. When I got that truck, I was qualified in driving manual, so I had to get qualified in AMT. it took an entire 30 minutes of instruction from my trainer. Then off I went with my AMT and it was to my benefit. You DO NOT need to learn manual shifting to drive a truck.

Except if she decides to leave the OTR world and find something local finding a job with an automatic restriction could very well be a challenge. Away from the world of mega carriers many companies are still using manual transmissions. The carrier I'm at has some automatics but won't even consider you if you have a restriction and you need to be able to pass you're road test in a 10 speed.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Anne A. (and sometimes To's Comment
member avatar

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Andrea, put manuals out of your thinking. If a school doesn’t train you on AMT (Auto Mated Transmission, aka ‘auto’, just move on to training that does. The vast majority of training trucks will be AMT.

I trained on manual exclusively and have driven manual vehicles since I first started. When I was issued my first truck, I got an AMT. I would never go back to manual. When I got that truck, I was qualified in driving manual, so I had to get qualified in AMT. it took an entire 30 minutes of instruction from my trainer. Then off I went with my AMT and it was to my benefit. You DO NOT need to learn manual shifting to drive a truck.

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Except if she decides to leave the OTR world and find something local finding a job with an automatic restriction could very well be a challenge. Away from the world of mega carriers many companies are still using manual transmissions. The carrier I'm at has some automatics but won't even consider you if you have a restriction and you need to be able to pass you're road test in a 10 speed.

Good point, Zach. However, many women usually won't entertain the thought of H/H (heavy haul,) OS/OD, or 'off road' AND H/H type work as G'Town does. Nor would they often lean toward combo dumps; many being manual in the paving industry, as well.

Many LTL companies are still running a good bit of manuals, per Bobcat, Delco, and Banks; just don't see a lot of females pulling doubles , either. I don't ever care to! Wouldn't ride w/ Tom, when he did, even if allowed. Out of my wheelhouse.

Me, personally? I WANT SO BAD to test on a manual when my turn comes, but may have to 'suck it up' like a buttercup at that moment; and have the restriction removed at a later (necessary) date. (I'll find you, PJ!)

When I had my CDLP, all I drove was baby manuals/no 18's. I've never (legally) driven an auto, or AMT, for the record.

It's a mixed bag of chips. The 'specialized' industry still does, and purportedly will/need to have manuals. Then again, the drivers in those jobs are seasoned, obviously, and won't be detrimental to the clutch and tranny.

Wishing ya well, O/P . . . either way! Just go with it. You & I can rent a manual & split the cost, as needed, haha!

Best wishes;

~ Anne ~

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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