Good Vibes From A Fleet Manager.

Topic 32186 | Page 1

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Ramos L.'s Comment
member avatar

Hello all,

First of, I'm not sure if I'm breaking a rule here but let me clarify I'm not a driver or prospective driver.

I'm a Fleet Manager for a large U.S. company (won't mention name in case that breaks forum rules and to not make this look like cheap promotion).

Anywho, I've browsed this forum for a few years, back when I started as a recruiter for said company, but figured I would create an account and say hi.

Reading this forum has made me further realize the passion, battles, struggles and joy of being a truck driver and I want to thank Brett for making this space. I've learnt a lot by reading it and has helped me understand and sympathize with drivers even more.

Truck driving is a challenging, yet rewarding and fulfilling career. It is NOT for everyone, but if you are the type of person who likes an adventure, unpredictability and good money, this is a great career for you. Whether that is OTR , Dedicated, Regional or Intermodal position, it does not matter. What matters is that you're doing a TREMENDOUS contribution and labour for millions of people. The country (and the world, for that matter) moves because of people like you, and you should be super proud about that.

That being said, thank you for doing what you do. Keep being safe out there and enjoy what you do. I wish you the best of success in any company you're working with.

Keep on trucking.

Ramos.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Intermodal:

Transporting freight using two or more transportation modes. An example would be freight that is moved by truck from the shipper's dock to the rail yard, then placed on a train to the next rail yard, and finally returned to a truck for delivery to the receiving customer.

In trucking when you hear someone refer to an intermodal job they're normally talking about hauling shipping containers to and from the shipyards and railyards.

Fleet Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
IDMtnGal 's Comment
member avatar

Ramos,

Welcome to Trucking Truth! Glad you joined us....and you are welcome. I may be a young "old" lady, but I STILL enjoy driving.

Now to hit the bunk so I can get up at the crack of dawn to get my load to the Port of Oakland.

Laura

Stevo Reno's Comment
member avatar

Maybe MORE FM's n DM's should browse around and read stuff too....Might give them a whole new perspective on the driver side of the industry, as it has for you Ramos....thank-you-2.gif

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Anne A. (and sometimes To's Comment
member avatar

Hello all,

First of, I'm not sure if I'm breaking a rule here but let me clarify I'm not a driver or prospective driver.

I'm a Fleet Manager for a large U.S. company (won't mention name in case that breaks forum rules and to not make this look like cheap promotion).

Anywho, I've browsed this forum for a few years, back when I started as a recruiter for said company, but figured I would create an account and say hi.

Reading this forum has made me further realize the passion, battles, struggles and joy of being a truck driver and I want to thank Brett for making this space. I've learnt a lot by reading it and has helped me understand and sympathize with drivers even more.

Truck driving is a challenging, yet rewarding and fulfilling career. It is NOT for everyone, but if you are the type of person who likes an adventure, unpredictability and good money, this is a great career for you. Whether that is OTR , Dedicated, Regional or Intermodal position, it does not matter. What matters is that you're doing a TREMENDOUS contribution and labour for millions of people. The country (and the world, for that matter) moves because of people like you, and you should be super proud about that.

That being said, thank you for doing what you do. Keep being safe out there and enjoy what you do. I wish you the best of success in any company you're working with.

Keep on trucking.

Ramos.

Welcome to TT, Ramos!

You're not breaking any rules at all; glad to have you! We used to have a recruiter/FM from Greater Omaha Express (GOE) in the mix, pre covid. JRod was a great guy, we loved his input. Had an insurance underwriter (Cornelius) join us, awhile back..as well.

Some of us appreciate YOUR end of the spectrum, as well..even us 'Trucker's Wives!'

Thanks for stopping in, and stay in the mix! Send your friends our way; we love company, too.

~ Anne & Tom ~

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Intermodal:

Transporting freight using two or more transportation modes. An example would be freight that is moved by truck from the shipper's dock to the rail yard, then placed on a train to the next rail yard, and finally returned to a truck for delivery to the receiving customer.

In trucking when you hear someone refer to an intermodal job they're normally talking about hauling shipping containers to and from the shipyards and railyards.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Fleet Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Ramos L.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-end.png

Welcome to TT, Ramos!

You're not breaking any rules at all; glad to have you! We used to have a recruiter/FM from Greater Omaha Express (GOE) in the mix, pre covid. JRod was a great guy, we loved his input. Had an insurance underwriter (Cornelius) join us, awhile back..as well.

Some of us appreciate YOUR end of the spectrum, as well..even us 'Trucker's Wives!'

Thanks for stopping in, and stay in the mix! Send your friends our way; we love company, too.

~ Anne & Tom ~

I've actually sent the link to Brett's book to a couple of DMs. I think it has very valuable information about what life really is behind the wheel and the thought process of a driver. Behind our desks we do our best to keep our drivers happy and busy. I'm in the OTR division so sometimes things get tricky with trips and swaps and all the things that comes with this, but we really enjoy what we do and get great satisfaction when our drivers are succeeding.

Sometimes the perception of a dispatcher can be like "this dude is a jerk" and sure, maybe there are some out there, that's people for you. But seriously, the vast majority want for you to do well. It's never personal, it is just that we have a job to do and customers to take care of. Plus, this is a production-based industry. The more you drive, the better your paychecks will be. People should see that as a compliment and an opportunity, rather than a punishment.

I say this for anyone browsing around trying to get their feet wet in this lifestyle (I refer to trucking, specially OTR as lifestyle, not job). Happy to give some insight behind the scenes as well and tell some truths or facts.

Stay safe out there.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Anne A. (and sometimes To's Comment
member avatar

I've actually sent the link to Brett's book to a couple of DMs. I think it has very valuable information about what life really is behind the wheel and the thought process of a driver. Behind our desks we do our best to keep our drivers happy and busy. I'm in the OTR division so sometimes things get tricky with trips and swaps and all the things that comes with this, but we really enjoy what we do and get great satisfaction when our drivers are succeeding.

Sometimes the perception of a dispatcher can be like "this dude is a jerk" and sure, maybe there are some out there, that's people for you. But seriously, the vast majority want for you to do well. It's never personal, it is just that we have a job to do and customers to take care of. Plus, this is a production-based industry. The more you drive, the better your paychecks will be. People should see that as a compliment and an opportunity, rather than a punishment.

I say this for anyone browsing around trying to get their feet wet in this lifestyle (I refer to trucking, specially OTR as lifestyle, not job). Happy to give some insight behind the scenes as well and tell some truths or facts.

Ramos, that's awesome !

I know you probably don't care to mention your company, but ... if you DO end up with any 'disgruntleds' .. send them over here; we'll set'em straight, for sure! :)

Another thing; could you perhaps outline how YOU got into doing what you do, and what would be the best way for someone looking to get into the 'office' life? A few of our guys have left driving, and one left to become a fleet manager of sorts; another is applying for the 'head of safety' position.

I've known a few drivers that get 'burned out' and might actually be GOOD at the other end of the spectrum, honestly.

Have you ever driven? Do you have a CDL?

It'd be really nice to hear some of the things that we drivers (and wives of) wonder about Y'ALL !

Thanks, Ramos. Good to have you.

~ Anne ~

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Fleet Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Ramos L.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

I've actually sent the link to Brett's book to a couple of DMs. I think it has very valuable information about what life really is behind the wheel and the thought process of a driver. Behind our desks we do our best to keep our drivers happy and busy. I'm in the OTR division so sometimes things get tricky with trips and swaps and all the things that comes with this, but we really enjoy what we do and get great satisfaction when our drivers are succeeding.

Sometimes the perception of a dispatcher can be like "this dude is a jerk" and sure, maybe there are some out there, that's people for you. But seriously, the vast majority want for you to do well. It's never personal, it is just that we have a job to do and customers to take care of. Plus, this is a production-based industry. The more you drive, the better your paychecks will be. People should see that as a compliment and an opportunity, rather than a punishment.

I say this for anyone browsing around trying to get their feet wet in this lifestyle (I refer to trucking, specially OTR as lifestyle, not job). Happy to give some insight behind the scenes as well and tell some truths or facts.

double-quotes-end.png

Ramos, that's awesome !

I know you probably don't care to mention your company, but ... if you DO end up with any 'disgruntleds' .. send them over here; we'll set'em straight, for sure! :)

Another thing; could you perhaps outline how YOU got into doing what you do, and what would be the best way for someone looking to get into the 'office' life? A few of our guys have left driving, and one left to become a fleet manager of sorts; another is applying for the 'head of safety' position.

I've known a few drivers that get 'burned out' and might actually be GOOD at the other end of the spectrum, honestly.

Have you ever driven? Do you have a CDL?

It'd be really nice to hear some of the things that we drivers (and wives of) wonder about Y'ALL !

Thanks, Ramos. Good to have you.

~ Anne ~

Never driven, don't have a CDL. I came in as a recruiter about five years ago. I used to work as an e-commerce rep but moved here for a better opportunity and chance to grow. After that, I moved to the Accident Investigations department and now OTR.

I think a good bit of companies would take you as long as you have a clean record and they have openings, of course. If you're in a bigger company like I am, there are going to be so many departments you can be a part of. From safety, to fleet manager, accidents, recruiting, logistics, and many others.

I don't have a big problem telling you where I'm at, but again, it would probably sound as kind of cheap promo.

Be safe out there.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Fleet Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
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