Schlumberger Oilfield Concrete Driving

Topic 32537 | Page 1

Page 1 of 1
Travis's Comment
member avatar

Anyone worked for them? Specifically with doing concrete. Mostt of what I see is positive, especially in regards to training and safety.

Given that I live in Mexicali, Mexico but my license is NC I'm having to book my own flights from NC to San Diego and cross the border for home time if I want to see the wife and daughters and the $ adds up. Schlumberger covers your flights plus has double the time at home. 15 days on 6 off vs 4 weeks on to get 6 days off currently.

Not complaining about my current job at all, I love it, but more time at home and paid travel is a powerful enticement.

Aside from Schlumberger, any tips on oilfield work in particular? Already know it's gonna be cold, hard work these months if I take itand ordered some Ariat work wear and smartwool base layers and socks(can use them if I don't want the job there too)

Bush Country's Comment
member avatar

Travis -

Where is the job located?

Schlumberger, or as they are changing the name, “SLB” is the world’s largest oilfield service company. I’ve not worked for them, but I have worked for other service companies and been in the business for over 40 years.

The advantages I see for the job for a driver are – hourly pay, time off, and full benefits (health, dental, & vision insurance, 401k, etc). There’s also room for promotion – normally a bulk truck driver would move up to cement pump operator, and from that to cementer (service supervisor). For housing, they will probably put you up in a man camp – I’d ask about that to be sure. I’m surprised that SLB is paying for flights for operators, so get that in writing. You will travel on your time, which makes that 6 days off more like 4 depending on your travel schedule.

The hours for your two weeks on duty are long. You will be out in the weather no matter what it is. I work on the frac side, and the only thing we shut down for is lightning since we have so much electronic equipment on location. You will also eventually work every day of the year. Drilling rigs, which you will be delivering to, generally don’t shut down for holidays.

Other companies that should have positions like this are Halliburton, BJ Services, and Nextier. Plus there’s some smaller companies, but I’m not sure which of them are in the cementing side.

There are other driving jobs. Hauling frac sand, fuel delivery, rig moving (specialized trucks for this), hauling drill pipe & casing, and so on. I don’t recommend hauling sand – it’s done by a lot of small companies as third-party contractors, and I suspect that a lot of them are 1099 companies. Fuel delivery, on the other hand, I’ve had every driver I’ve asked say that it is the best driving job they’ve had.

Not to be pedantic, but it is cement, not concrete. Concrete has aggregate in it and is used in construction. Cement is what holds the aggregate together. Oil field cementing does not use aggregate.

Hopes this helps!

Travis's Comment
member avatar

It's a contract through an agency, 90 days to possible hire. I emailed them and asked for a copy of the contract with all the days on and off, travel being paid(or not) and man camp accomodations and any per diem as well as any other stipulations and benefits etc made to me.

I'll let you know what I hear back. It's through Fieldbridge

Travis -

Where is the job located?

Schlumberger, or as they are changing the name, “SLB” is the world’s largest oilfield service company. I’ve not worked for them, but I have worked for other service companies and been in the business for over 40 years.

The advantages I see for the job for a driver are – hourly pay, time off, and full benefits (health, dental, & vision insurance, 401k, etc). There’s also room for promotion – normally a bulk truck driver would move up to cement pump operator, and from that to cementer (service supervisor). For housing, they will probably put you up in a man camp – I’d ask about that to be sure. I’m surprised that SLB is paying for flights for operators, so get that in writing. You will travel on your time, which makes that 6 days off more like 4 depending on your travel schedule.

The hours for your two weeks on duty are long. You will be out in the weather no matter what it is. I work on the frac side, and the only thing we shut down for is lightning since we have so much electronic equipment on location. You will also eventually work every day of the year. Drilling rigs, which you will be delivering to, generally don’t shut down for holidays.

Other companies that should have positions like this are Halliburton, BJ Services, and Nextier. Plus there’s some smaller companies, but I’m not sure which of them are in the cementing side.

There are other driving jobs. Hauling frac sand, fuel delivery, rig moving (specialized trucks for this), hauling drill pipe & casing, and so on. I don’t recommend hauling sand – it’s done by a lot of small companies as third-party contractors, and I suspect that a lot of them are 1099 companies. Fuel delivery, on the other hand, I’ve had every driver I’ve asked say that it is the best driving job they’ve had.

Not to be pedantic, but it is cement, not concrete. Concrete has aggregate in it and is used in construction. Cement is what holds the aggregate together. Oil field cementing does not use aggregate.

Hopes this helps!

Per Diem:

Getting paid per diem means getting a portion of your salary paid to you without taxes taken out. It's technically classified as a meal and expense reimbursement.

Truck drivers and others who travel for a living get large tax deductions for meal expenses. The Government set up per diem pay as a way to reimburse some of the taxes you pay with each paycheck instead of making you wait until tax filing season.

Getting per diem pay means a driver will get a larger paycheck each week but a smaller tax return at tax time.

We have a ton of information on our wiki page on per diem pay

Jammer a's Comment
member avatar

I work in the oil fields and my company uses schumberger and all them guys leave one job on to the next and are always upset tbey dont get home time but they do gwt paid well

It's a contract through an agency, 90 days to possible hire. I emailed them and asked for a copy of the contract with all the days on and off, travel being paid(or not) and man camp accomodations and any per diem as well as any other stipulations and benefits etc made to me.

I'll let you know what I hear back. It's through Fieldbridge

double-quotes-start.png

Travis -

Where is the job located?

Schlumberger, or as they are changing the name, “SLB” is the world’s largest oilfield service company. I’ve not worked for them, but I have worked for other service companies and been in the business for over 40 years.

The advantages I see for the job for a driver are – hourly pay, time off, and full benefits (health, dental, & vision insurance, 401k, etc). There’s also room for promotion – normally a bulk truck driver would move up to cement pump operator, and from that to cementer (service supervisor). For housing, they will probably put you up in a man camp – I’d ask about that to be sure. I’m surprised that SLB is paying for flights for operators, so get that in writing. You will travel on your time, which makes that 6 days off more like 4 depending on your travel schedule.

The hours for your two weeks on duty are long. You will be out in the weather no matter what it is. I work on the frac side, and the only thing we shut down for is lightning since we have so much electronic equipment on location. You will also eventually work every day of the year. Drilling rigs, which you will be delivering to, generally don’t shut down for holidays.

Other companies that should have positions like this are Halliburton, BJ Services, and Nextier. Plus there’s some smaller companies, but I’m not sure which of them are in the cementing side.

There are other driving jobs. Hauling frac sand, fuel delivery, rig moving (specialized trucks for this), hauling drill pipe & casing, and so on. I don’t recommend hauling sand – it’s done by a lot of small companies as third-party contractors, and I suspect that a lot of them are 1099 companies. Fuel delivery, on the other hand, I’ve had every driver I’ve asked say that it is the best driving job they’ve had.

Not to be pedantic, but it is cement, not concrete. Concrete has aggregate in it and is used in construction. Cement is what holds the aggregate together. Oil field cementing does not use aggregate.

Hopes this helps!

double-quotes-end.png

Per Diem:

Getting paid per diem means getting a portion of your salary paid to you without taxes taken out. It's technically classified as a meal and expense reimbursement.

Truck drivers and others who travel for a living get large tax deductions for meal expenses. The Government set up per diem pay as a way to reimburse some of the taxes you pay with each paycheck instead of making you wait until tax filing season.

Getting per diem pay means a driver will get a larger paycheck each week but a smaller tax return at tax time.

We have a ton of information on our wiki page on per diem pay

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