What Endorsements Can A CDL Permit Attain ?

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Jon C.'s Comment
member avatar

Got it!

4 long 12 hour class days and aced my class tests and all 3 DMV test's. Celebrating by getting a tooth extracted tomorrow.

However, I was super focused on what I needed to pay attention to and not much else. Am sure the teacher advised but I didn't write those down or retain if I heard.

Which endorsements do I qualify to attain with permit? Figure if I am missing a day of class tomorrow I will make the best of it.

Thanks in advance.

Jon

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DMV:

Department of Motor Vehicles, Bureau of Motor Vehicles

The state agency that handles everything related to your driver's licences, including testing, issuance, transfers, and revocation.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Etch's Comment
member avatar

I can only speak for North Carolina because I literally just went through this, but you can test out on all endorsements. Some companies may require certain ones like tanker or doubles-triples. DMV may try to give you a little grief. Just tell them that you need them to test. Haz-Mat is probably one you don’t want unless you absolutely need it for a job.

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DMV:

Department of Motor Vehicles, Bureau of Motor Vehicles

The state agency that handles everything related to your driver's licences, including testing, issuance, transfers, and revocation.

Travis's Comment
member avatar

You can even do the actual driving parts of the passenger and bus endorsements with a permit?

I can only speak for North Carolina because I literally just went through this, but you can test out on all endorsements. Some companies may require certain ones like tanker or doubles-triples. DMV may try to give you a little grief. Just tell them that you need them to test. Haz-Mat is probably one you don’t want unless you absolutely need it for a job.

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DMV:

Department of Motor Vehicles, Bureau of Motor Vehicles

The state agency that handles everything related to your driver's licences, including testing, issuance, transfers, and revocation.

Etch's Comment
member avatar

For passenger you can take the written, but you have to test on a bus to get the endorsement on your license.

You can even do the actual driving parts of the passenger and bus endorsements with a permit?

double-quotes-start.png

I can only speak for North Carolina because I literally just went through this, but you can test out on all endorsements. Some companies may require certain ones like tanker or doubles-triples. DMV may try to give you a little grief. Just tell them that you need them to test. Haz-Mat is probably one you don’t want unless you absolutely need it for a job.

double-quotes-end.png

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DMV:

Department of Motor Vehicles, Bureau of Motor Vehicles

The state agency that handles everything related to your driver's licences, including testing, issuance, transfers, and revocation.

Travis's Comment
member avatar

Yes, i mean can you take the test on a bus with just the permit?

For passenger you can take the written, but you have to test on a bus to get the endorsement on your license.

double-quotes-start.png

You can even do the actual driving parts of the passenger and bus endorsements with a permit?

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

I can only speak for North Carolina because I literally just went through this, but you can test out on all endorsements. Some companies may require certain ones like tanker or doubles-triples. DMV may try to give you a little grief. Just tell them that you need them to test. Haz-Mat is probably one you don’t want unless you absolutely need it for a job.

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DMV:

Department of Motor Vehicles, Bureau of Motor Vehicles

The state agency that handles everything related to your driver's licences, including testing, issuance, transfers, and revocation.

Etch's Comment
member avatar

Yes.

Yes, i mean can you take the test on a bus with just the permit?

double-quotes-start.png

For passenger you can take the written, but you have to test on a bus to get the endorsement on your license.

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

You can even do the actual driving parts of the passenger and bus endorsements with a permit?

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

I can only speak for North Carolina because I literally just went through this, but you can test out on all endorsements. Some companies may require certain ones like tanker or doubles-triples. DMV may try to give you a little grief. Just tell them that you need them to test. Haz-Mat is probably one you don’t want unless you absolutely need it for a job.

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DMV:

Department of Motor Vehicles, Bureau of Motor Vehicles

The state agency that handles everything related to your driver's licences, including testing, issuance, transfers, and revocation.

Sandman J's Comment
member avatar

Each state is different. In Illinois for example, you can only have Tanker, Schoolbus and Passenger on a CLP. I have to wait until I have my CDL to test for Doubles/Triples and Hazmat. I wonder with all the requirements for HM if all states require the CDL first for that.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

CLP:

Commercial Learner's Permit

Before getting their CDL, commercial drivers will receive their commercial learner's permit (CLP) upon passing the written portion of the CDL exam. They will not have to retake the written exam to get their CDL.

NaeNaeInNC's Comment
member avatar

Montana and North Carolina required the background check paperwork first before I could test for HazMat. I have heard otherwise from other NC people who went to different locations than I used.

Each state is different. In Illinois for example, you can only have Tanker, Schoolbus and Passenger on a CLP. I have to wait until I have my CDL to test for Doubles/Triples and Hazmat. I wonder with all the requirements for HM if all states require the CDL first for that.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

CLP:

Commercial Learner's Permit

Before getting their CDL, commercial drivers will receive their commercial learner's permit (CLP) upon passing the written portion of the CDL exam. They will not have to retake the written exam to get their CDL.

Jon C.'s Comment
member avatar

I do NOT want to drive a school bus or any other type of passenger vehicle. I got into this to be an OTR truck driver. I would really like to see the lower 48. However, due to circumstances created by yours truly, I was unable to get hired on by the larger companies that take newbies. However, I am a firm believer in " I am where I am because its exactly where I am supposed to be".

Got hired on by a local family business here in Knoxville TN, Skyline. They pride themselves on getting drivers home for the weekend and state the average is 2,500 miles a week. I want more. I will do my Orientation with them the Monday after Thanksgiving and have a chat with the owner whom is "approachable" and lay my cards on the table to him. I know I am "wet behind the ears" and need to cut my teeth 6 months to a year before I am a trucker. However, I am fully confident I will be a company's top tier employee having been the employer for 30 years. I know what its like behind the desk.

Short of sounding ****y or egotistical, it will be their job to keep me as an employee and I will put my money where my mouth is. Actions speak louder than words. After 8 months ( time it takes for them to reimburse tuition and me to honor my promissory note) , I will revisit with the owner and we will see where I am at. If its the right fit for both of us it will all work out as the Universe thinks it should. Otherwise, I will do my research, provide a 2 week notice and "keep on trucking".

Now, got to get ready for that tooth extraction in the AM.

Make it a great night. It is a choice.

Jon

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Ryan B.'s Comment
member avatar

I do NOT want to drive a school bus or any other type of passenger vehicle. I got into this to be an OTR truck driver. I would really like to see the lower 48. However, due to circumstances created by yours truly, I was unable to get hired on by the larger companies that take newbies. However, I am a firm believer in " I am where I am because its exactly where I am supposed to be".

Got hired on by a local family business here in Knoxville TN, Skyline. They pride themselves on getting drivers home for the weekend and state the average is 2,500 miles a week. I want more. I will do my Orientation with them the Monday after Thanksgiving and have a chat with the owner whom is "approachable" and lay my cards on the table to him. I know I am "wet behind the ears" and need to cut my teeth 6 months to a year before I am a trucker. However, I am fully confident I will be a company's top tier employee having been the employer for 30 years. I know what its like behind the desk.

Short of sounding ****y or egotistical, it will be their job to keep me as an employee and I will put my money where my mouth is. Actions speak louder than words. After 8 months ( time it takes for them to reimburse tuition and me to honor my promissory note) , I will revisit with the owner and we will see where I am at. If its the right fit for both of us it will all work out as the Universe thinks it should. Otherwise, I will do my research, provide a 2 week notice and "keep on trucking".

Now, got to get ready for that tooth extraction in the AM.

Make it a great night. It is a choice.

Jon

You don't even have a CDL and you are already talking about how you are going to dictate terms with your first employer and 1 measly year of experience? Unless you find yourself quite a bit more humility, trucking is going to slap you upside the head with a harsh dose of reality. You have to make it through training before you can be a top tier employee. I have my doubts that you will make it through training because you have maintained this "I am so much smarter than everyone else" mentality.

Trainers really hate people coming in with your type of attitude because you are the type of person who will question everything before doing it and many times training requires doing first and asking questions later.

I hate to dump all over you, but you have constantly come on here flouting how damn good you are. We don't give a @&!? what you have done before now and having all the confidence in the world means nothing, if you are not willing to be humble when necessary.

I think what will trip you up right out of the gate is the fact that 2,300 miles/week will require staying out some weekends. It will probably require 11 days on and 3 days off. Yes, your new employer probably will get drivers home every weekend, if they want. I guarantee that many of the drivers going home every weekend are either not getting 2,300 miles... OR, here is another thing... They are home long enough for a reset and then back in the road. A reset is 34 hours. You get home at 10 pm on Friday, and back to work 8 am on Sunday. That's your weekend at home.

Jon, change your attitude or you won't make it out of training with your new company because you will get kicked out of the truck. A small company like that, trainers talk to each other. You could end up in a situation where no one wants you on their truck because no one wants to train a newb who thinks he has it all figured out.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

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