Rookie Ready For 'next'

Topic 32787 | Page 1

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Jason H.'s Comment
member avatar

So i went against the advice here and started my driving career in Sept 2022 on a 'Dollar account' with a big carrier. The CDL school I went to had an influence in that decision, but I'm the one who pulled the trigger on it. Guess im one of those people who just have to figure things out the hard way... (note to new drivers considering Dollar accounts --- every word of warning found on TT is accurate)

Anyway. The aforementioned big carrier has no other openings in my area (Kansas City) for solo drivers. Im on a few wait lists for different accounts, but not holding my breath.

I've decided to stick this out for a few months, so i can start a new job as 'experienced' and not have to do the extended time with a trainer all over again.

Looking for input on some of the companies ive talked to and am considering moving forward with.

Roehl. Knight. ACT (american central transport). Butler. Hirschbach. Are the ones I have talked to. Anybody driving for any of them and could give me some pros and cons ? Would be extra helpful if anybody from the KC area could chime in. I know there are company reviews on here but most of them seem to be from several years ago.

Also, if there are other companies that others would recommend...

Despite going against the advice earlier (lesson learned), i actually do respect the advice and experience of drivers on TT. Thanks in advance for any replies.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
PackRat's Comment
member avatar

What about any and all companies that hire? Why limit yourself to only a few? How long are you planning to stay with your current "mystery employer"? A minimum of a year is recommended, especially with your first driving job.

Klutch's Comment
member avatar

Does it have to be OVR? I did my year over the road with a mega but so glad to be local now. Home daily, weekends off and more money than I ever made on the road. To each their own.

Over The Road:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Jason H.'s Comment
member avatar

"What about any and all companies that hire? Why limit yourself to only a few? How long are you planning to stay with your current "mystery employer"? A minimum of a year is recommended, especially with your first driving job." Appreciate the reply PackRat. Im not really limiting myself to those few that i mentioned. Those are just the ones i have been in contact with and feel like good possibilities. Was just looking for anyone with experience with those companies. Im open to anywhere that is going to be a better fit for me. Ill turn 50 in march, and would like to find a job / company that feels like it can be 'home' for the next several years.

The 'mystery company' is Werner. Didnt think the name was important or made a difference in my question. Planning to stay up to 6 months to build experience. Maybe longer if one of the wait lists open up in that time. But i would prefer a place where when i call in with questions or for help, i dont have to give some random employee number. Id like to feel like a more valuable piece to the puzzle than that. Thats just a personal preference. Maybe thats an unrealistic expectation?

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Jason H.'s Comment
member avatar

Does it have to be OVR? I did my year over the road with a mega but so glad to be local now. Home daily, weekends off and more money than I ever made on the road. To each their own.

Thanks Klutch. Id be good with home daily. Ive read and heard a lot (here and other places) that you pretty much have to do a year otr before home daily becomes a real option. Im home weekly now which isnt bad, and my family is adapting to it pretty well. Being out any longer than that would be a stretch and strain on home life for sure.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Over The Road:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

We recommend company sponsored schools, never go local as a rookie, and to stay driving with the first company for at least a year (preferably OTR where the most experience will be achieved). Those dollar store recruiters are good salesmen because most drivers don't survive either physically or driving on these tough accounts, especially any new drivers. I would enjoy knowing what the turnover numbers are.

It appears to me that you are looking for a regional position which is what you are on now with Werner.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Jason H.'s Comment
member avatar

We recommend company sponsored schools, never go local as a rookie, and to stay driving with the first company for at least a year (preferably OTR where the most experience will be achieved). Those dollar store recruiters are good salesmen because most drivers don't survive either physically or driving on these tough accounts, especially any new drivers. I would enjoy knowing what the turnover numbers are.

It appears to me that you are looking for a regional position which is what you are on now with Werner.

Currently driving dollar general for werner. It is what it is, and ill stick it out until the timing and situation is right to move on. With or without werner. Not in love with either dollar general or werner. Just looking at options for a different way of doing things.

Turnover... ?? day 1 they told a group of us... Half the drivers on the account have less than 3 months experience. People quit after 3 days. 3 weeks. Or 3 months. Most people who last past that time become trainers for the never-ending supply of replacement recruits.

Unloading the freight is brutal physical work and the nature of the account comes with a lot of additional expectations for a new driver. All of which is discussed in other posts.

I knew on day 1 with my trainer in September that id be looking for something different as soon as it made sense to. Just made this post today to share my situation and see if anybody has any suggestions along those lines.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

All you shared above is precisely why we attempt to steer those with no experience away from these accounts because it is generally a recipe for failure. As a new driver, it can actually be a career ending decision. For what?

For anyone thinking about driving local or regional on one of these "dollar accounts", think long and hard before buying a sales pitch from a recruiter that needs to fill a seat in a truck. Look up the many discussions on here over the years in the Search Bar at the top of the page by typing in "Dollar Accounts".

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Pacific Pearl's Comment
member avatar

Dry Van Regional CDL Truck Driver | $92,000 Annual, Plus NEW $10k Sign On Bonus | Kansas City, KS

Kansas City, KS Posted: 3/11/2021 Team Number: 539 Ruan is hiring full time regional delivery drivers to haul batteries in dry vans for our dedicated national customer based in St Joseph, MO. Regional store delivery drivers will deliver palletized batteries via an electric pallet jack and pick up return core. Drivers typically depart on Sunday with multi stops loads, may take 2 to 3 loads per week and home weekly, most weekends. We are also now offering a new $10,000 sign on bonus! Join the Ruan team and apply today! For more information, please call us at 1-800-879-7826.

New $10,000 sign on bonus Our average St. Joe driver has been with us for over 11 years! Union Position Average $ 92,000 annually or $1,750+ per week $.5177 CPM , $22.51 hourly rate for stop, delay, pre/post, fuel pay calculations and $25.00 Per Diem Layover Hazardous material required within 60 days. Ruan can assist to obtain. Call 1-800-879-7826 for more information!

#DriveRuan

Minimum Requirements

Must be at least 22 years or older No more than three moving violations in the past three years (some restrictions apply) No more than one DOT recordable preventable accident in the last three years Additional qualifications will apply With the Department of Transportation's Drug and Alcohol Clearinghouse in effect, all applicants must create a profile at fmcsa.dot.gov before being hired 9 months of tractor/trailer experience required

Benefits

Recent update! Newly hired drivers earn 80 hours of vacation after one year Paid holidays Paid time off Great benefits including medical, dental, and vision 401(k) Retirement Plan. Company matches 50 percent of your deferral (up to 6 percent) after one year of service. Health Savings Account (HSA) Health Care Flexible Spending Account (FSA) Dependent Care Flexible Spending Account (FSA) Short and long term disability Benefits start in 30 days of employment Free virtual visits with Doctor On Demand or in-network provider Wellness and tuition reimbursements

Call a recruiter today at (800) 879-7826.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

CSA:

Compliance, Safety, Accountability (CSA)

The CSA is a Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) initiative to improve large truck and bus safety and ultimately reduce crashes, injuries, and fatalities that are related to commercial motor vehicle

FMCSA:

Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration

The FMCSA was established within the Department of Transportation on January 1, 2000. Their primary mission is to prevent commercial motor vehicle-related fatalities and injuries.

What Does The FMCSA Do?

  • Commercial Drivers' Licenses
  • Data and Analysis
  • Regulatory Compliance and Enforcement
  • Research and Technology
  • Safety Assistance
  • Support and Information Sharing

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Per Diem:

Getting paid per diem means getting a portion of your salary paid to you without taxes taken out. It's technically classified as a meal and expense reimbursement.

Truck drivers and others who travel for a living get large tax deductions for meal expenses. The Government set up per diem pay as a way to reimburse some of the taxes you pay with each paycheck instead of making you wait until tax filing season.

Getting per diem pay means a driver will get a larger paycheck each week but a smaller tax return at tax time.

We have a ton of information on our wiki page on per diem pay

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