Driver Retention

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James H. (ZenZulu)'s Comment
member avatar

Is there anyway to find out who has the best driver retention rate among the companies that accept new drivers?

Old School's Comment
member avatar
Best Answer!

Hey guys at the risk of sounding like a guy who only has one drum to beat, I'm gonna put in my two cents on "driver retention".

I don't see it as any sort of a measurement to go by for a new driver just starting out in this career. Your first year as a professional driver is gonna be a tough lesson in what it takes to not only survive in this career, but hopefully also in how to thrive as a truck driver. It is tough on everybody, I don't care how talented or skilled they are. One might could argue that the organization, or the lack of it, at some companies causes them to lose drivers, but for the most part these trucking companies are in a state of flux at any given moment. I could have given up several times while I was with my trainer, because of his crazy ridiculous methods. But then when I went in to talk to the suits in the office for my final evaluation, they basically told me only half the guys who go out with this trainer ever make it all the way through, and they figured I was tough enough for the job just for enduring my time with him.

That is the truth, and those who have been in here long enough probably remember me reporting this bizarre experience. So, does one company have a higher retention number just because they keep everybody that comes in, or does another have a lower number because they are trying like crazy to make the quitters give up at the onset? My trainer even told me at one point that he was impressed that I had hung in there so long, because as he put it, "most of the guys break down crying and want to go home on their second week out here."

I think I understand what you're looking for when you ask such a question, but more than likely it is an expectation that you have that is based on the ever present false premise on-line that some of these trucking companies are evil greedy mills, that are just trying to use inexperienced drivers who will work for peanuts, and then be discarded with a few bad marks on their DAC report.

I'm really just trying to steer you in another direction for the basis of your decision on which company you would like to work for at first. I'm finishing up my first year at Western Express, a company that is maligned on-line all the time, and very seldom if ever has any one given them a good word. Why is it that way when I have been very successful there, and have enjoyed the start to my career excessively? I personally have always believed that a man with an experience always trumps a man with an argument. My experience has been that you will be the major element in whether you are retained by the company or move on to another faltering attempt at this career. If you go into this with the attitude that I'm going to make this work no matter how crazy, or difficult, or unorganized it seems to me now; I'm going to realize that I'm just a green-horn who hasn't even had one year of safe driving under his belt yet, so I will hopefully understand how all this works better by this time next year, then you my friend will be increasing the driver retention rate at whichever company you have chosen to get started at, and you will be one less driver we have to be concerned with going on-line and blasting some well meaning trucking company with a bunch of foolish drivel.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Anchorman's Comment
member avatar

CRETE CARRIER

Industry Low Driver Turnover Rate - 42%

"Our driver turnover is less than one-third of the overall industry average." -CEO Tonn Ostergard

James H. (ZenZulu)'s Comment
member avatar

CRETE CARRIER

Industry Low Driver Turnover Rate - 42%

"Our driver turnover is less than one-third of the overall industry average." -CEO Tonn Ostergard

Thanks Anchorman. I'll check them out

PorkChop's Comment
member avatar

Would there be a BETTER, independent place to find an answer, other than a self-serving Company CEO? No disrespect intended, but ALL businessmen "promote" their own interests. Just saying…

LittleJoe

Old School's Comment
member avatar
Best Answer!

Hey guys at the risk of sounding like a guy who only has one drum to beat, I'm gonna put in my two cents on "driver retention".

I don't see it as any sort of a measurement to go by for a new driver just starting out in this career. Your first year as a professional driver is gonna be a tough lesson in what it takes to not only survive in this career, but hopefully also in how to thrive as a truck driver. It is tough on everybody, I don't care how talented or skilled they are. One might could argue that the organization, or the lack of it, at some companies causes them to lose drivers, but for the most part these trucking companies are in a state of flux at any given moment. I could have given up several times while I was with my trainer, because of his crazy ridiculous methods. But then when I went in to talk to the suits in the office for my final evaluation, they basically told me only half the guys who go out with this trainer ever make it all the way through, and they figured I was tough enough for the job just for enduring my time with him.

That is the truth, and those who have been in here long enough probably remember me reporting this bizarre experience. So, does one company have a higher retention number just because they keep everybody that comes in, or does another have a lower number because they are trying like crazy to make the quitters give up at the onset? My trainer even told me at one point that he was impressed that I had hung in there so long, because as he put it, "most of the guys break down crying and want to go home on their second week out here."

I think I understand what you're looking for when you ask such a question, but more than likely it is an expectation that you have that is based on the ever present false premise on-line that some of these trucking companies are evil greedy mills, that are just trying to use inexperienced drivers who will work for peanuts, and then be discarded with a few bad marks on their DAC report.

I'm really just trying to steer you in another direction for the basis of your decision on which company you would like to work for at first. I'm finishing up my first year at Western Express, a company that is maligned on-line all the time, and very seldom if ever has any one given them a good word. Why is it that way when I have been very successful there, and have enjoyed the start to my career excessively? I personally have always believed that a man with an experience always trumps a man with an argument. My experience has been that you will be the major element in whether you are retained by the company or move on to another faltering attempt at this career. If you go into this with the attitude that I'm going to make this work no matter how crazy, or difficult, or unorganized it seems to me now; I'm going to realize that I'm just a green-horn who hasn't even had one year of safe driving under his belt yet, so I will hopefully understand how all this works better by this time next year, then you my friend will be increasing the driver retention rate at whichever company you have chosen to get started at, and you will be one less driver we have to be concerned with going on-line and blasting some well meaning trucking company with a bunch of foolish drivel.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
James H. (ZenZulu)'s Comment
member avatar

I see what your saying but I haven't gone out of my way to find dirt on companies. I also am already with my first company. And haven't written anything bad about them other than I'm leaving them. As far as all the talk about being tough enough to be in the trucking industry... to me it's pure nonesense. Anybody who has known me for any length of time will tell you I am one of the toughest people they have ever met. But regardless of that, putting new employees through what is essentially Hazing is just bad business. Ofcourse it weeds out the crybabies. But it will also weed out selfrespecting people who have integrity and know what they are worth. And the latter is exactly who any sensible employer wants on their team. People who demand respect tend to give it. They respect other peoples property time and money. For example i am returning the truck im sitting in now clean and with the best air freshener I could find. I am also currently doing a one mile run from a drop lot and then resuming waiting for a previous pick up that will have been a 2 day wait. All this without complaining.

Flux or no flux there should at least always be a reasonable level of communication.

I'm not looking for a pat on the back or to join some fraternity. I'm simply trying to pay my bills. If enter a contract with someone or some company and I do more than my share which i normaly do because that's just my way, I expect them to at least do they bare minimum of what they said thet will do.

And if I ask them what the problem is and I get a generic answer that has nothing to do with my specific situation. Than that's it. I looking to partner up with someone or some entity that is sensible.

I catch on to things that I'm interested quicker than most. And I like driving trucks. Anybody whi is not interested in being a slave knows that ultimately they work for themselves regardless of what type of taxes they pay. And when you work for yourself and you plan on being successful yoy don't give away your product for less than its worth. Especially not when it's a sellers market.

James H. (ZenZulu)'s Comment
member avatar

I should also mention that I didn't give my notice where I'm at until I found a new job. A job with more hometime and at a company with more satisfied drivers. So I am fine. But I'll always be looking for more information wherever I can get it. Because that's what successful people do.

James H. (ZenZulu)'s Comment
member avatar

I also forgot to mention that when i get this truck back to the company I'll have driven 300 plus miles with a fat nail sticking out of one of my drive tires and a clutch that likes to stick to the floor but it doesn't bother me much 'cause I already learned how to float.

guyjax(Guy Hodges)'s Comment
member avatar

Everyone has their reasons for leaving the company they are with. What ever that reason that maybe.

The only thing I see a problem with is you mentioned a sellers market....I assume you mean with all the companies needing drivers that you can pick and choose what company you would like....right?

Well that could not be farther from the truth. Thousands of drivers are completing trucking school every week. There are very long wait times for new students to get a trainer. Sometimes that is a month or more wait.

Right now it's not a drivers market. It's a trucking companies market due to the influx of drivers that are waiting just to start driving. Companies can and will be picky about who they hire. One black mark on your DAC report ,weather true or not, can stop you from getting another job. Even if it's a minor mark it can hurt you.

I completely agree that if your company is not a good fit for you then you should move on. If the issues were completely on the company side then yea maybe it's time to move on but if you turned down loads,no matter the reason, or were disagreeable even once when calling in then that will be remembered. The reason I bring this up is the new company that you will be going to WILL be calling your current company and ask them how you were as a driver. Let's hope you got along with your DM

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

James H. (ZenZulu)'s Comment
member avatar

I didn't have a dm to get along with. In theory i did but they never came to work do I've been dealing with a series of random stand-ins. But either way I'm a polite person. One time a road maintenence guy that i was on the phone with told me he wished more drivers were like me.

Also as I said I already have another job lined up. And I haven't refused any loads not even after I gave notice that I'm leaving

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
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