CDL School Question

Topic 3964 | Page 1

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Gary A.'s Comment
member avatar

As I read the diaries, I see a lot of drivers go with the company training as opposed to tech school training, like I am. When my program is complete (7 weeks) I will be a fully qualified CDL class A driver. The school ensures that their graduates have all endorsements. SO I'm reading a lot of diaries that describe pretty much the same training at the company. I don't want to do everything TWICE!!! What happens to guys who graduate from schools like mine?

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

Starcar's Comment
member avatar

You need to be applying for PRE Hire letters now !!! A company will hire you, with your cdl , and send you out wit ha trainer. You will get your practical otr experience, and get paid !! So get those apps for pre hire letters sent out Apply For Truck Driving Jobs and heres a link to explain about pre hire letters...Understanding Pre-Hires Good Luck, and keep us posted !!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Pre-hire:

What Exactly Is A Pre-Hire Letter?

Pre-hire letters are acceptance letters from trucking companies to students, or even potential students, to verify placement. The trucking companies are saying in writing that the student, or potential student, appears to meet the company's minimum hiring requirements and is welcome to attend their orientation at the company’s expense once he or she graduates from truck driving school and has their CDL in hand.

We have an excellent article that will help you Understand The Pre-Hire Process.

A Pre-Hire Letter Is Not A Guarantee Of Employment

The people that receive a pre-hire letter are people who meet the company's minimum hiring requirements, but it is not an employment contract. It is an invitation to orientation, and the orientation itself is a prerequisite to employment.

During the orientation you will get a physical, drug screen, and background check done. These and other qualifications must be met before someone in orientation is officially hired.

Pre Hire:

What Exactly Is A Pre-Hire Letter?

Pre-hire letters are acceptance letters from trucking companies to students, or even potential students, to verify placement. The trucking companies are saying in writing that the student, or potential student, appears to meet the company's minimum hiring requirements and is welcome to attend their orientation at the company’s expense once he or she graduates from truck driving school and has their CDL in hand.

We have an excellent article that will help you Understand The Pre-Hire Process.

A Pre-Hire Letter Is Not A Guarantee Of Employment

The people that receive a pre-hire letter are people who meet the company's minimum hiring requirements, but it is not an employment contract. It is an invitation to orientation, and the orientation itself is a prerequisite to employment.

During the orientation you will get a physical, drug screen, and background check done. These and other qualifications must be met before someone in orientation is officially hired.

Pre-hires:

What Exactly Is A Pre-Hire Letter?

Pre-hire letters are acceptance letters from trucking companies to students, or even potential students, to verify placement. The trucking companies are saying in writing that the student, or potential student, appears to meet the company's minimum hiring requirements and is welcome to attend their orientation at the company’s expense once he or she graduates from truck driving school and has their CDL in hand.

We have an excellent article that will help you Understand The Pre-Hire Process.

A Pre-Hire Letter Is Not A Guarantee Of Employment

The people that receive a pre-hire letter are people who meet the company's minimum hiring requirements, but it is not an employment contract. It is an invitation to orientation, and the orientation itself is a prerequisite to employment.

During the orientation you will get a physical, drug screen, and background check done. These and other qualifications must be met before someone in orientation is officially hired.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Max E.'s Comment
member avatar

I start private CDL school (or tech school) this next monday. my school like a lot of the other schools i see work with different OTR companies. like my school is connected with Werner, Covenant, May, and Eagle Tuscon. There are also several other companies that will hire CDL school graduates. The links on this site are great help for finding a company. just a reminder that some companies are picky when it comes to what CDL school you go to. They will hire you if you go to X school but not if you go to Y school. Talk to the director of your school or whatever person is in charge of the "pre-hires" and they will be more then willing to help you out. Thats the case at my school as im sure many other schools are similar.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Pre-hire:

What Exactly Is A Pre-Hire Letter?

Pre-hire letters are acceptance letters from trucking companies to students, or even potential students, to verify placement. The trucking companies are saying in writing that the student, or potential student, appears to meet the company's minimum hiring requirements and is welcome to attend their orientation at the company’s expense once he or she graduates from truck driving school and has their CDL in hand.

We have an excellent article that will help you Understand The Pre-Hire Process.

A Pre-Hire Letter Is Not A Guarantee Of Employment

The people that receive a pre-hire letter are people who meet the company's minimum hiring requirements, but it is not an employment contract. It is an invitation to orientation, and the orientation itself is a prerequisite to employment.

During the orientation you will get a physical, drug screen, and background check done. These and other qualifications must be met before someone in orientation is officially hired.

Pre-hires:

What Exactly Is A Pre-Hire Letter?

Pre-hire letters are acceptance letters from trucking companies to students, or even potential students, to verify placement. The trucking companies are saying in writing that the student, or potential student, appears to meet the company's minimum hiring requirements and is welcome to attend their orientation at the company’s expense once he or she graduates from truck driving school and has their CDL in hand.

We have an excellent article that will help you Understand The Pre-Hire Process.

A Pre-Hire Letter Is Not A Guarantee Of Employment

The people that receive a pre-hire letter are people who meet the company's minimum hiring requirements, but it is not an employment contract. It is an invitation to orientation, and the orientation itself is a prerequisite to employment.

During the orientation you will get a physical, drug screen, and background check done. These and other qualifications must be met before someone in orientation is officially hired.

Heavy C's Comment
member avatar

First of welcome to TT. I don't know if you have read my diary on here but I went to a private school. It was from back in November but you should check it out. Now as far as jobs go definitely get your prehires now and get as many as you can. When I got my license I has at least a dozen waiting for me. For me though when I finished I knew I was going to try everything I could to stay local because of my family. Luckily for me I found something and haven't been happier. Though this isn't the norm to get something local in class A without experience it is possible. If your intention I'd to go OTR Then get prehires start looking into the companies. If you want to stay local then stay looking now at who's hiring. Even if they aren't when your done you can get an idea of what out there. Then start calling and emailing to find out who will hire you. Do all of this before you even start school that way you have a plan as soon as you have that CDL in hand. Good luck!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Prehire:

What Exactly Is A Pre-Hire Letter?

Pre-hire letters are acceptance letters from trucking companies to students, or even potential students, to verify placement. The trucking companies are saying in writing that the student, or potential student, appears to meet the company's minimum hiring requirements and is welcome to attend their orientation at the company’s expense once he or she graduates from truck driving school and has their CDL in hand.

We have an excellent article that will help you Understand The Pre-Hire Process.

A Pre-Hire Letter Is Not A Guarantee Of Employment

The people that receive a pre-hire letter are people who meet the company's minimum hiring requirements, but it is not an employment contract. It is an invitation to orientation, and the orientation itself is a prerequisite to employment.

During the orientation you will get a physical, drug screen, and background check done. These and other qualifications must be met before someone in orientation is officially hired.

Prehires:

What Exactly Is A Pre-Hire Letter?

Pre-hire letters are acceptance letters from trucking companies to students, or even potential students, to verify placement. The trucking companies are saying in writing that the student, or potential student, appears to meet the company's minimum hiring requirements and is welcome to attend their orientation at the company’s expense once he or she graduates from truck driving school and has their CDL in hand.

We have an excellent article that will help you Understand The Pre-Hire Process.

A Pre-Hire Letter Is Not A Guarantee Of Employment

The people that receive a pre-hire letter are people who meet the company's minimum hiring requirements, but it is not an employment contract. It is an invitation to orientation, and the orientation itself is a prerequisite to employment.

During the orientation you will get a physical, drug screen, and background check done. These and other qualifications must be met before someone in orientation is officially hired.

Gary A.'s Comment
member avatar

Well, I went to a Schneider "job fair" and spoke with the guy there and he said to hold off until about the 3rd or 4th week of class before getting pre-hire letters. At the tech school presentation, I asked the instructor about it and he said that the Schneider guy was right, because there was no point in moving ahead until you see how you do in class (?)-I'm assuming that there's a drop out rate and that's what they were talking about...I still have a few weeks before class starts anyway...

Pre-hire:

What Exactly Is A Pre-Hire Letter?

Pre-hire letters are acceptance letters from trucking companies to students, or even potential students, to verify placement. The trucking companies are saying in writing that the student, or potential student, appears to meet the company's minimum hiring requirements and is welcome to attend their orientation at the company’s expense once he or she graduates from truck driving school and has their CDL in hand.

We have an excellent article that will help you Understand The Pre-Hire Process.

A Pre-Hire Letter Is Not A Guarantee Of Employment

The people that receive a pre-hire letter are people who meet the company's minimum hiring requirements, but it is not an employment contract. It is an invitation to orientation, and the orientation itself is a prerequisite to employment.

During the orientation you will get a physical, drug screen, and background check done. These and other qualifications must be met before someone in orientation is officially hired.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Gary, when you attend a private school whether it be a junior college, tech school, or a private truck driving school, you will still have to spend probably a minimum of four weeks with a trainer at your first driving job.

When my program is complete (7 weeks) I will be a fully qualified CDL class A driver. The school ensures that their graduates have all endorsements.

One of the most important things to realize as you get started is that the schooling is only the very first beginnings of your training. Basically the purpose of the schooling is just to get you a Class A license. That way you can begin your journey of becoming a truck driver. So, when you go to school, just plan on it being only the first steps of a lengthy process. Your first steps may not be as wonderful as you would like them to be - first steps are usually awkward, but the experiences we get from each step along the way all work together toward helping us become a professional driver. It's a process that you are just starting at the school.

I'll give you what I consider to be some valuable advice when considering attending a school. Don't expect to come out of any CDL training school being able to handle a Big Rig like a professional. They will only get you far enough along so that you can get your license, that's their purpose. They are not there to make you into a truck driver, they are simply helping you get to the point where you can pass some skills and knowledge tests so that you can get the license which will allow you to begin learning to be a truck driver.

That's why all these large carriers who are willing to hire new drivers with no experience put you with a trainer for usually a minimum of four weeks. That is where you will learn the bare minimum basics of how to do the job before they take a huge chance by putting you in a rig all by yourself. Trust me, for the next entire year you will be learning and honing your skills as a truck driver, and even after that you will still be learning, but that first entire year is a huge learning curve. This is part of the reason why there is almost a 100% turn-over rate in this industry. I recently spoke with some management people at a large flat-bed carrier who told me their average rookie flat-bed driver lasts 90 days before calling it quits. There is not a school in the land that can prepare you for all the crazy stuff you're gonna run into when driving a truck all across this great country.

Gary, when they finally hand you the keys to your very own truck, you'll be wondering if you are really ready for this, and if your not, in about thirty six hours you will be. There's nothing like experience to both teach us and humble us. Everybody makes some really dumb rookie mistakes, but the combination of the schooling and the training time is intended to minimize the damages the average rookie driver will cause.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Gary A.'s Comment
member avatar

Thanks y'all..I've been reading some of the CDL Training diaries ( a lot of 'em as a matter of fact) and got a pretty decent idea of what's coming. I did drive deliveries for quite a while here in Atlanta, but that wasn't semis, just delivery vans. So I have a little experience driving for a career, but realize that NONE of that will matter going into it. I actually went to a private truck driving school for 1 day a long time ago..Got to back a BIG RIG for the first time! Did it by myself and pegged it right in the hole..THEN they told me tuition was like $8000.00 and I said "Man, I can pay for 3 semesters at COLLEGE for that!" so I didn't go back...

The HARDEST part is the waiting..school doesn't start until July 2nd, and I think that's only for one day before the holiday..I've been studying the training materials, and will probably go through the whole thing again while waiting...Just want to get STARTED!!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
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