Eliminating Cigarette Odor Out Of Your Semi-tractor

Topic 4023 | Page 1

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Heavy P.'s Comment
member avatar

Hi you all, first time posting here.

I'm a 40 year old finally getting a career, trucking. I should have done this 10 years ago. I did my training, got my CDL , and scored a job with a smaller company that I think will be a great fit. I'll be driving a reefer trailer and picking up food in Los Angeles, then delivering LTL loads all over the west. Not bad huh? I'll get to travel my favorite states, like CA, AZ, and Nevada.

Getting on to the topic, my observations are that there are a lot of tobacco users in the trucking occupation. It seemed everyone in my CDL school either did "dip" or smoked, including the instructors. My company trainer smokes, no big deal as that will only last for a few weeks.

But you know when they assign me my own truck that thing is going to stink of cigarettes. And that triggers asthma with me. When you're a new driver you get the beater I understand, it was the same way when I drove a taxi.

So, is it possible to completely remove cigarette odor, and get the truck smelling awesome again? I'll do whatever it takes. If it costs money to have it professional done, no problem. The truck will be permanently assigned to me. Or I could try doing it myself, I did buy a steam cleaner a couple of days ago for household use. I also read about ozone shock treatments to remove stubborn odors.

I'll be living out of this truck for up to a week at a time, so I want my "home" home to be comfortable and smell good. Thank you.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

Welcome aboard Heavy P!

Well first of all, a lot of companies will try to keep non-smokers out of trucks that formerly were used by smokers. No guarantees of course, but they try. So at least request it.

The second thing is that you mentioned it triggers your asthma. Obviously that's a much more urgent reason for getting a truck that doesn't reek like tobacco, so try running that by the company and hopefully they'll find something decent.

I was never a smoker so I don't know any tricks for getting the smell out. I'm sure plenty of others here will chime in. But if by chance you do get stuck in a nasty smelling truck there will be places on the road to take it. You'll find truck washes that do detailing, and you'll also find private entrepreneurs sometimes on the CB that are looking to clean trucks for a few bucks. But you'll find places you can take it if you can't figure out a way to get it out yourself.

HAMMERTIME's Comment
member avatar

Hi you all, first time posting here.

I'm a 40 year old finally getting a career, trucking. I should have done this 10 years ago. I did my training, got my CDL , and scored a job with a smaller company that I think will be a great fit. I'll be driving a reefer trailer and picking up food in Los Angeles, then delivering LTL loads all over the west. Not bad huh? I'll get to travel my favorite states, like CA, AZ, and Nevada.

Getting on to the topic, my observations are that there are a lot of tobacco users in the trucking occupation. It seemed everyone in my CDL school either did "dip" or smoked, including the instructors. My company trainer smokes, no big deal as that will only last for a few weeks.

But you know when they assign me my own truck that thing is going to stink of cigarettes. And that triggers asthma with me. When you're a new driver you get the beater I understand, it was the same way when I drove a taxi.

So, is it possible to completely remove cigarette odor, and get the truck smelling awesome again? I'll do whatever it takes. If it costs money to have it professional done, no problem. The truck will be permanently assigned to me. Or I could try doing it myself, I did buy a steam cleaner a couple of days ago for household use. I also read about ozone shock treatments to remove stubborn odors.

I'll be living out of this truck for up to a week at a time, so I want my "home" home to be comfortable and smell good. Thank you.

Try using these but you might have to use a few of them.

I used them on one of my old trucks I got from Marten Transport and it work but I also wiped down all the walls.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Kevin C.'s Comment
member avatar

Hi you all, first time posting here.

I'm a 40 year old finally getting a career, trucking. I should have done this 10 years ago. I did my training, got my CDL , and scored a job with a smaller company that I think will be a great fit. I'll be driving a reefer trailer and picking up food in Los Angeles, then delivering LTL loads all over the west. Not bad huh? I'll get to travel my favorite states, like CA, AZ, and Nevada.

Getting on to the topic, my observations are that there are a lot of tobacco users in the trucking occupation. It seemed everyone in my CDL school either did "dip" or smoked, including the instructors. My company trainer smokes, no big deal as that will only last for a few weeks.

But you know when they assign me my own truck that thing is going to stink of cigarettes. And that triggers asthma with me. When you're a new driver you get the beater I understand, it was the same way when I drove a taxi.

So, is it possible to completely remove cigarette odor, and get the truck smelling awesome again? I'll do whatever it takes. If it costs money to have it professional done, no problem. The truck will be permanently assigned to me. Or I could try doing it myself, I did buy a steam cleaner a couple of days ago for household use. I also read about ozone shock treatments to remove stubborn odors.

I'll be living out of this truck for up to a week at a time, so I want my "home" home to be comfortable and smell good. Thank you.

www.itk1.com. Try the "Target Surface Cleaner" product on there. It works wonders on cat ****, (trust me on that one). This should do you just fine. You can actually call the owner and he will send you a spray bottle of it. It's 100% all natural and has zero nasty chemicals plus, it smells great. IMO

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Heavy P.'s Comment
member avatar

Thank you all for your suggestions, I'll check them out. And I'll see if I can get a non-smoking truck. By the way, the ozone generators I mentioned, they don't neutralize the smell forever either. The thing is, tobacco leaves a residue of tar, including the internals of the AC system. If worse comes to worst I'll just keep those cleaners mentioned handy. And I'll think positive, just maybe I'll get a non-smoker's truck. The company uses Peterbilt 380 series trucks.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
RedGator's Comment
member avatar

A smoker once told me to get a foam nerf football and cut it in half. Place in a pladtic container and put in a whole thing of pinsol. Let it sit for a few days and the odors will abdorb into the football and your truck will smell fresh.

Jimmy P. 's Comment
member avatar

You may also try putting an open can of coffee on the passenger floor the coffee will absorb tobacco smell and the coffee smell will help mask the smell also !

Kathi M.'s Comment
member avatar

Wipe down/clean all surface areas. Clean any carpeted area with granulated carpet cleaner. Leave it on for at least 15-20 minutes and then vacuum. Cedar chips. You can get a big bag a pet supply place (even Walmart probably). Place the chips in shallow bowls or perforated bags (nylons, onion bag, delicate laundry bag, etc) in the area and replace as/if needed. Febreze Air Effects spray is amazing. Febreze candles. And, Lysol neutra air sanitizing spray.

All of these items are available at any Walmart and most grocery stores. Good Luck!!

Eric G.'s Comment
member avatar

I always hated the smell of cigarettes. My parents smoked inside the house for years and I never thought it was that bad until I moved away and then visited later. I know when it came to my clothing I use to put stuff in the deep freeze. Hey for a few bucks I think you could get a high school student to clean your vehicle real good.

Pat M.'s Comment
member avatar
SUPER CARPET-FRESH™ is amazing at 1) removing smoke and smoke smell from all carpets and fabrics, 2) removing perspiration odors & stains from clothing & fabrics, 3) removing urine odors & stains from all fabrics, 4) cleaning up wax-based stains (shoe polish, lipstick, floor wax, car wax, bee’s wax, candle wax, etc.) from all kinds of fabrics, 5) cleaning up pet and baby accidents – 6) it even eliminates the smell of skunk! If your dog gets sprayed by a skunk you can clean up the area, clothing, and even wash your dog with SUPER CARPET-FRESH™ - and the smell is gone in 5 minutes – REALLY!

you can find it here http://www.eatoils.com/product.php?id=65

It is enzymes that do the work. You can use on hard surfaces too. I have seen a smoke damaged house from the house next door burning and an open window smell free in 3 hours. Including the clothes and everything.

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