[Video] Truck Driver Busts Cop On His Cellphone, Speeding

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Anchorman's Comment
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Published on Jun 25, 2014 Illinois State Police says he is above the law

Truckers Accuses Cop Of Speeding & Cell Phone Use

Brian Miner was pulled over in Illinois last week after he honked his truck horn at a state police officer he claims was using his cellphone while speeding on a wet highway.
Anchorman's Comment
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GOTCHA! Truck Driver Busts Cop On His Cellphone, Speeding

A truck driver showed what can happen when police officers find out they’re being videotaped.

Brian Miner was pulled over in Illinois last week after he honked his truck horn at a state police officer he claims was using his cellphone while speeding on a wet highway.

“I pulled you over – the horn, I don’t know what that was about,” the officer told Miner, who recorded the traffic stop.

“Because you were speeding and had your cellphone in your hand,” said Miner, explaining why he was honking.

“Police officers can actually use technology when they’re driving,” said the officer.

“Oh, so you guys are above the law?” Miner asked.

The officer replied, arguing that Miner couldn’t be sure that he was exceeding the 70 miles-per-hour speed limit.

“You passed me! How fast were you driving? Are you above the speed limit as well?” Miner asks, telling the officer that he had his cruise control set at 65 miles per hour.

“You were going well over 70,” Miner exclaimed. The officer did not back down, claiming that Miner had no good reason to honk his horn.

“There was a good reason to,” Miner said. “You were speeding, it’s wet roads. You were speeding with a cellphone in your hand."

Unphased, the officer told Miner he was issuing him a ticked for “unlawful use of horn.” Then Miner issued a game-changer.

“By the way, you’re being recorded,” said the trucker, as he picked the camera up from his dashboard and directed it towards the officer.

“Yeah, so are you,” said the officer, in a moment of defiance that would soon dissipate.

The officer asked Miner how many driving hours he had left for the day and then went back to his cruiser to check the trucker’s license and registration.

But by the time he got back to the truck, the officer was singing a different tune.

“I didn’t write you a ticket,” he told Miner. “I didn’t want to hurt your record.”

He said he conducted a truck inspection, but found that Miner was “violation-free.”

“So that should look good for your company,” the officer said, adding “I understand you using the horn.”

“Honestly, I wasn’t paying attention to my speed,” said the officer. “Either way, you were just trying to help me out – help me drive safely, I understand that.”

“We’re all out here sharing the same road,” said Miner. “You should be held accountable to the same standards I am.”

The officer agreed, while maintaining that he wasn’t sure how fast he was driving and claiming that he could not remember whether or not he was using his cellphone.

“Enjoy that violation-free MCS inspection,” the officer said.

The officer headed back to his cruiser, and Miner turned the camera on himself. “And that’s what happens when they know you’re recording,” he said

Scotty D's Comment
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I have the utmost respect for both professional truck drivers and members of law enforcement. That being said, while the truck driver may have been correct, he was a bit of a d-bag (can I say that here?). Throughout the interaction, the officer kept his professional demeanor in spite of the trucker "poking the bear" so to speak (pun intended). rofl-3.gif

Gary A.'s Comment
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I have the utmost respect for both professional truck drivers and members of law enforcement. That being said, while the truck driver may have been correct, he was a bit of a d-bag (can I say that here?). Throughout the interaction, the officer kept his professional demeanor in spite of the trucker "poking the bear" so to speak (pun intended). rofl-3.gif

Yeah, I saw this and I agree, Driver COULD have been a little less of a jerk.

mountain girl's Comment
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Throughout the interaction, the officer kept his professional demeanor

Off topic to Scotty D: Dude, you drove a Hemmet? That is SO bad-ass.

-mountain girl

Brett Aquila's Comment
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I have the utmost respect for both professional truck drivers and members of law enforcement. That being said, while the truck driver may have been correct, he was a bit of a d-bag (can I say that here?). Throughout the interaction, the officer kept his professional demeanor in spite of the trucker "poking the bear" so to speak (pun intended). rofl-3.gif

I agree 100%.

Once again a trucker decided he would try to get someone in trouble by suckering them into saying or doing something on film. When was the last time? When Abe tried setting up dispatch to take the fall and wound up proving in the end that he was the problem all along, not dispatch.

And just like Abe, this trucker thinks he proved his point and looks great. And right on cue a handful of knuckleheads jump in (YouTube comments), as always, to defend anything any trucker says or does. Unfortunately, the true professionals out there, regardless of industry, will say the trucker is the one who looks like an idiot in this case.

First of all, should it be necessary to tell an adult to treat police officers with respect? I mean, I don't care if you hate every cell in every cop's body. Don't you have an ounce of sense at all???

Second of all, why don't we follow this truck driver around with our own camera while he does his job? Why don't we provoke him constantly and see how long he keeps his cool and does his job 100% legally. I'd bet anything that this guy couldn't get to lunchtime on any given day without breaking some sort of law, accidentally or intentionally, and he wouldn't keep his cool for 30 seconds if you wanted to provoke him.

Now I'm all for dash cams and I think people should do all they can to protect themselves out there. There are a lot of dishonest people, and some of them (unfortunately) even become police officers. But this had nothing to do with a driver protecting himself and this had nothing to do with a police officer not being professional. This driver was clearly the instigator right from the start when he decided he'd start blowing his horn at a cop to show his disapproval of what the cop was doing. Then he tried everything in his power to aggravate the cop and draw him into saying or doing something he shouldn't so he could be a "YouTube Hero".

Ya know what the true professional drivers were doing while this clown was trying to get cops in trouble and make a name for himself? They were hauling freight, making money, working hard for their company, and taking care of the customer.

I've always used the words "helpful" and "logical" as a filter for my thoughts and actions. I always try to remain aware of everything I'm thinking and doing, and I try to make sure it's all helpful and logical. Apply that filter to this case and you'll find nothing the driver did was helpful or logical. It was childish, risky, and unprofessional. It didn't help anyone in any way.

I think the last people on Earth that should worry about making other people look like idiots are truckers. How about we at least try acting like professionals and elevate the standing of truck drivers to something above "bottom of the barrel" in our society before we start trying to make other professionals look bad. Do ya think we can agree on that strategy?

Good grief.

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Scotty D's Comment
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double-quotes-start.png

Throughout the interaction, the officer kept his professional demeanor

double-quotes-end.png

Off topic to Scotty D: Dude, you drove a Hemmet? That is SO bad-ass.

-mountain girl

thank-you-2.gif Still do drive them and love it! Steering takes some getting used to. shocked.png (that's the face of people in other lane you're turning toward!)

Silverbolt's Comment
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I'm going to pile in with my two cents: I believe that the trucker in this case did everything exactly correct. Every single thing. Everything he did, and everything he said. I do not ever say "fn©k the police'; that's not my way. But I will say that everything that this driver did and said was exactly what should have been done and said.

That's my opinion only.

Brett Aquila's Comment
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everything that this driver did and said was exactly what should have been done and said.

But why???? Why would you blow your horn at a cop to tell him you disapprove of his behavior, and then continuously antagonize him hoping he'll slip up and say or do something he shouldn't? For what??? How is that professional, helpful, or logical in any way?

And did it ever dawn on you that he's messing with one of the only authorities on this planet that can pretty much devastate his career with the stroke of a pen? That seems well thought out now, doesn't it. Especially considering he had absolutely nothing else to gain. I mean, why not risk your job, your money, and your career to irritate someone who did absolutely nothing to you at all. Seems worth it, right?

Small-minded, insecure people are always out to make themselves look like they're important - that they're capable of having an influence on others. They don't care if the effect they have is negative or positive, productive or unproductive. As long as they do something that effects someone else in some way they'll feel important I guess.

The best example of this is the obnoxious class clowns we all went to school with growing up. They didn't care what they had to say or do, or how much trouble they got in, as long as they had an influence on people and got attention for it. That was their only goal. And that's exactly what this looks like to me.

He accomplished absolutely nothing except to prove he's stupid enough to antagonize a cop even though he counts on his CDL to make a living. He criticizes the cop for speeding and using a cell phone, as if this clown has never done anything so heinous himself, right? I mean, he must be an impeccable angel, otherwise he would be nothing more than a childish, antagonistic hypocrite don't ya think?

So I ask you - why was everything he said and did exactly what should have been done and said? For what goal? And how do you justify taking that kind of risk when there's nothing to gain from it?

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

MaddMatt's Comment
member avatar

I do think the outcome of this was good. The cop was breaking laws and thought he could get away with reckless driving, but he was reminded that there are cameras everywhere nowadays so maybe he will think twice about it in the future.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

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