No Hire

Topic 4288 | Page 1

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Dale Y.'s Comment
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why wont companys hire u if u been out work for 3 yrs? cant find jobs any help out there?

Old School's Comment
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Dale, the reason for the work history is a Federally regulated ruling that came about after 9/11. The government had concerns of terrorist wanting to use big trucks in a similar fashion as they did with the airplanes. I have seen a considerable number of people get hired who had been out of work for years. It's all in how you present the information. If you just say I've been out of work for the last three years, then they can not hire you due to the regulation that requires them to have a record of what you've been doing for that three year gap. For all they know you could have been in Afghanistan at a training camp for terrorists during that time period.

What you've got to do is provide them a time-line with no gaps in it. If you have a three year period with no employment records then you have got to have a friend, a neighbor, or maybe a relative write a note telling them that during that time period you were looking for work, or mowing lawns, working for cash under the table, or whatever it was you were doing. Then go and have those notes notarized. It is best to try and get three of them if possible. Records of unemployment pay stubs, or any thing like that will also support your case. If you are careful and diligent with this information you will see that three years of unemployment is not the problem, but rather not being able to prove what you were up to during that time period is what is snagging you up. Take the time and effort to get them some accurate information and you will soon find a job in the trucking industry.

Also, just curious, are you trying to get into a Company-Sponsored Training program, or are you planning on attending one of the private Truck Driving Schools?

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Company-sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Dale Y.'s Comment
member avatar

Got a cdl

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
guyjax(Guy Hodges)'s Comment
member avatar

Got a cdl

If you have a cdl already there is no reason why you should not have been able to find employment during the last three years. Companies are begging for drivers unless there is a reason why such as tickets or wrecks or live in a no hire area like under a rock in the middle of the ocean. I don't know. But if you live anywhere on dry land in the US there are driving jobs out there. Maybe not who you want to drive for but there are jobs if you have a cdl.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
mountain girl's Comment
member avatar

What you've got to do is provide them a time-line with no gaps in it. If you have a three year period with no employment records then you have got to have a friend, a neighbor, or maybe a relative write a note telling them that during that time period you were looking for work, or mowing lawns, working for cash under the table, or whatever it was you were doing. Then go and have those notes notarized. It is best to try and get three of them if possible. Records of unemployment pay stubs, or any thing like that will also support your case. If you are careful and diligent with this information you will see that three years of unemployment is not the problem, but rather not being able to prove what you were up to during that time period is what is snagging you up. Take the time and effort to get them some accurate information and you will soon find a job in the trucking industry.

Good stuff to know. Thank you, Old School.

-mountain girl

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Dale, there are tons of jobs for drivers out there, my company alone has been bringing in almost 100 new drivers every week. I was unaware that you already had your CDL , and to be honest with you that may be part of your problem. There's not hardly a company out there that can hire you without recent experience, or a recent training certificate. It's hard for us to give you the right help and direction without you giving us the information as to why you can't find work. You may have thought it was your work history, but it looks like it is because you have been out of the truck too long. The insurance companies will not cover someone without recent experience, or a recent training certificate. Therefore the companies will not hire anyone in that situation. If that is the problem, then you will need to get a refresher course through a Company-Sponsored Training program, or one of the private Truck Driving Schools.

We don't know why you haven't been working for three years, because you haven't divulged that information. And you certainly don't have to, but there has to be a reason other than that there were no driving jobs available. We help people get started in the trucking business everyday. We've got a ton of resources available to you, we've got years of accumulated knowledge of the industry, and we've got a bunch of helpful people here who can just about answer any of your concerns. As long as we have the proper information to go on as to what the problem is, I'm sure we can help you get behind the wheel somewhere.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Company-sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

SOBER-J's Comment
member avatar

Dale talk to US Express. I been out for 5 and a half years myself and going to work with them next week. Right now they are going back to a 18 months in 10 year period instead of a 1 year in 3.

You can check out some of my posts about it they all have US express in the heading.

I'm Sober-J over

Paul T.'s Comment
member avatar

why wont companys hire u if u been out work for 3 yrs? cant find jobs any help out there?

Hello everyone, I know this is a year old but since it is still very relevant I wanted to continue it.

This is my first post here. So anyway I am in the same situation as Dale here, and after reading this I now know why. So thank you for that.

Now, my question is this, does anyone have an example of what the letter should say? Is one sufficient, say from my sister?

Also what about credit reports, do they have any effect?

I have close to 15 years exp, mostly flatbed OTR , regional , and local. No tickets etc, no arrest record. This was from 1992 to 2007. I lost my real estate business in 2009 and have been sailing around Florida on a boat ever since. Its a cheap way to live but now I want to start over and get back to work etc, and have been hitting a wall.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Ernie S. (AKA Old Salty D's Comment
member avatar
I have close to 15 years exp, mostly flatbed OTR , regional , and local. No tickets etc, no arrest record. This was from 1992 to 2007. I lost my real estate business in 2009 and have been sailing around Florida on a boat ever since. Its a cheap way to live but now I want to start over and get back to work etc, and have been hitting a wall.

Paul,

Same answer we gave Dale, it would be best if you get at least 3 letters (and have them notarized) explaining what you have been doing. These letters can be from friends/neighbors/relatives as long as they are willing to vouch for your whereabouts during that time. It does not matter that you have been out of work for such a long time, what matters is that you can account for all that time.

Ernie

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Ernie S. (AKA Old Salty D's Comment
member avatar

Forgot to add, just a simple statement of the facts as to why you haven't been working works just fine. No need to get real technical or anything.

Ernie

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