Truck Vs Motorcycle Riding... Just Curious!

Topic 4472 | Page 1

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Chuck G.'s Comment
member avatar

I used to ride a motorcycle but had to give it up a couple of years ago for medical reasons. I loved riding the motorcycle, and would ride up to 500 miles a day! That takes stamina / concentration.

But I'm curious... I'm wondering what takes more stamina / concentration - driving a truck or a motorcycle?

I know one thing, getting into an accident when driving a truck can kill people! An accident on a motorcycle usually only harms/kills the motorcycle rider. That being said, I'm beginning to think driving a truck might require more stamina / concentration... on the other hand, the same amount of time on 2 wheels is no easy feat either.

The thought popped into my head, so I was just kind of curious as to what you all think from a trucker's perspective. Anyone have experience with both?

I only have motorcycle riding experience and am seriously considering trucking school.

6 string rhythm's Comment
member avatar

Each require their own kind of concentration, but I think you already answered your own question. Driving a commercial truck carries way more responsibility, and requires more concentration - it's also a different kind of concentration. When riding my motorcycle, I'm aware and concerned enough to make sure somebody doesn't kill ME - it's more self-preservation, from other motorists and even those blasted small animals crossing a country road that could send you airborne if you hit them right. With a commercial truck, you're concerned about others' safety, your own safety, and the responsibility of handling your company's load - not to mention being sure to obey all the numerous laws that come with handling a commercial vehicle.

Riding a bike requires you to be more aware than probably other motorists, so on that note, you may already be at least more conscientious than your typical steering wheel holder.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Fire-Man's Comment
member avatar

Each require their own kind of concentration, but I think you already answered your own question. Driving a commercial truck carries way more responsibility, and requires more concentration - it's also a different kind of concentration. When riding my motorcycle, I'm aware and concerned enough to make sure somebody doesn't kill ME - it's more self-preservation, from other motorists and even those blasted small animals crossing a country road that could send you airborne if you hit them right. With a commercial truck, you're concerned about others' safety, your own safety, and the responsibility of handling your company's load - not to mention being sure to obey all the numerous laws that come with handling a commercial vehicle.

Riding a bike requires you to be more aware than probably other motorists, so on that note, you may already be at least more conscientious than your typical steering wheel holder.

I wholeheartedly agree with the above. Driving a truck requires far more concentration, and overall skill, than riding a bike. You can generally get out of, or stay out of, trouble on a bike than you can in a truck. This alone reduces the stress and concentration required while riding. When riding I am, as previously mentioned, more concerned with things that can hurt me rather than what my actions or inattentiveness can do to myself and others. I will say that riding, IMHO, safer for me than driving a car... far fewer distractions.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Chuck G.'s Comment
member avatar

Each require their own kind of concentration, but I think you already answered your own question. Driving a commercial truck carries way more responsibility, and requires more concentration - it's also a different kind of concentration. When riding my motorcycle, I'm aware and concerned enough to make sure somebody doesn't kill ME - it's more self-preservation, from other motorists and even those blasted small animals crossing a country road that could send you airborne if you hit them right. With a commercial truck, you're concerned about others' safety, your own safety, and the responsibility of handling your company's load - not to mention being sure to obey all the numerous laws that come with handling a commercial vehicle.

Riding a bike requires you to be more aware than probably other motorists, so on that note, you may already be at least more conscientious than your typical steering wheel holder.

Excellent response! That pretty much nailed it. I don't have big rig driving experience yet, but had lots of motorcycle riding experience. I can definitely see now where more concentration would be required on the part of the trucker... although I do agree that its a completely different type of concentration. Thanks for the response!

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Daniel B.'s Comment
member avatar

Lets not forget that a truck takes a football field to come to a stop. We also have to worry about maintaining control of our trailer through curves, turns, and steep grades. You could take a downgrade at a too high of a gear and burn your brakes and either use the escape ramp or die. There's also right turns and driving with very limited space around you (like NYC). Some of these turns out here you'll make it by a few inches. In a motorcycle you're a mouse in a large world, in a truck it seems you're always too big for your surroundings.

I don't think it's fair to compare the two, the truck is much, much more difficult.

We also have to worry about laws and regulations, hours of service, being legal on our axles, truck routes, and a long list of other things.

Our maximum days can consist of miles up to the mid 600's. My personal best is 665 miles in a day and 800 in a 24-hour period.

Daniel B.'s Comment
member avatar

Also, why I mention the miles in a day if because you said you did 500.

The fact is that you probably did 500 at high speeds. I travel at 58mph and 62mph if I'm being schedule or need to make up for lost time. So doing 500 takes more time in a truck, plus we have setbacks like mountains, 30 minute break, 15 minute fueling, etc. On top of that, 500 miles is really an average drive for us and like I said we can go a whole lot more. We also have to deal with erratic sleep patterns so we are often tired as it is, especially when we work up to 14 hours per day with only a 10 hour rest break.

It's a whole different world.

Chuck G.'s Comment
member avatar

Also, why I mention the miles in a day if because you said you did 500.

The fact is that you probably did 500 at high speeds. I travel at 58mph and 62mph if I'm being schedule or need to make up for lost time. So doing 500 takes more time in a truck, plus we have setbacks like mountains, 30 minute break, 15 minute fueling, etc. On top of that, 500 miles is really an average drive for us and like I said we can go a whole lot more. We also have to deal with erratic sleep patterns so we are often tired as it is, especially when we work up to 14 hours per day with only a 10 hour rest break.

It's a whole different world.

Actually, no... those were days with riding in twisty, windy, curvy roads in the mountains. Speeds of 10-15 mph were not uncommon, hairpin turns were stressful. I rode cruisers, never those crotch rocket types that the adrenaline-seeking junkies ride. The most I ever did in a day was 600+ miles, and part of that was twisty, windy roads.... but mostly freeway and 2-lane highway that particular day. My typical riding day was around 5:30am to around 7 or 8pm. I was completely exhausted by the end of the day due to tremendous concentration... and I'm sure you must experience being ultra tired at the end of the day too.... but you guys do it every day! Many experienced bikers will stay away from big rigs, or get around them as quickly as possible because the drivers are frequently tired.... as you stated.

I thought of comparing the two because of the concentration / attention involved in driving each. Take your eyes off the road for a split second on a motorcycle and it can all be over... whereas a split second off the road on a truck can probably be gotten away with (having a wheel go into a large pothole won't kill you.... but it can take bikers down). A tiny SmartCar or MiniCooper that "just" touches a bike can knock it down, but no worries about that in anything with 4 or more wheels. A tire blowing out is a disaster on a bike. Hitting an oil spot on the road is a disaster, as is hitting a rock or uneven road, or gravel on the road, or even a simple puddle of water.

Granted the bike is miniscule in size when compared with a big rig... they're two opposite ends of the scale... which makes it interesting to compare one extreme with the other.... especially in my case, where the motorcycle was for pleasure... and now I'm considering moving up to the big rig end of the spectrum to make a living because I'm closing up my business in a couple of months (due to bad economy). So it was easy for me to start thinking about the differences between the two. You guys have an enormous responsibility! Much respect to you all.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Daniel B.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

Also, why I mention the miles in a day if because you said you did 500.

The fact is that you probably did 500 at high speeds. I travel at 58mph and 62mph if I'm being schedule or need to make up for lost time. So doing 500 takes more time in a truck, plus we have setbacks like mountains, 30 minute break, 15 minute fueling, etc. On top of that, 500 miles is really an average drive for us and like I said we can go a whole lot more. We also have to deal with erratic sleep patterns so we are often tired as it is, especially when we work up to 14 hours per day with only a 10 hour rest break.

It's a whole different world.

double-quotes-end.png

Actually, no... those were days with riding in twisty, windy, curvy roads in the mountains. Speeds of 10-15 mph were not uncommon, hairpin turns were stressful. I rode cruisers, never those crotch rocket types that the adrenaline-seeking junkies ride. The most I ever did in a day was 600+ miles, and part of that was twisty, windy roads.... but mostly freeway and 2-lane highway that particular day. My typical riding day was around 5:30am to around 7 or 8pm. I was completely exhausted by the end of the day due to tremendous concentration... and I'm sure you must experience being ultra tired at the end of the day too.... but you guys do it every day! Many experienced bikers will stay away from big rigs, or get around them as quickly as possible because the drivers are frequently tired.... as you stated.

I thought of comparing the two because of the concentration / attention involved in driving each. Take your eyes off the road for a split second on a motorcycle and it can all be over... whereas a split second off the road on a truck can probably be gotten away with (having a wheel go into a large pothole won't kill you.... but it can take bikers down). A tiny SmartCar or MiniCooper that "just" touches a bike can knock it down, but no worries about that in anything with 4 or more wheels. A tire blowing out is a disaster on a bike. Hitting an oil spot on the road is a disaster, as is hitting a rock or uneven road, or gravel on the road, or even a simple puddle of water.

Granted the bike is miniscule in size when compared with a big rig... they're two opposite ends of the scale... which makes it interesting to compare one extreme with the other.... especially in my case, where the motorcycle was for pleasure... and now I'm considering moving up to the big rig end of the spectrum to make a living because I'm closing up my business in a couple of months (due to bad economy). So it was easy for me to start thinking about the differences between the two. You guys have an enormous responsibility! Much respect to you all.

You'll find out soon enough :)

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Chris L.'s Comment
member avatar

I've been riding bikes all my life from scooters, dirt bikes, sport bikes, and I now have a cruiser 92' Electra Glide Classic. I love both riding and driving rigs. One big difference on riding is I would have to stop every 150 miles or so for fuel, but in a truck I will sometimes run right up to my 30 minute break nonstop 7 plus hours.

HAMMERTIME's Comment
member avatar

Depends what kind of Motorcycle you riding, you riding a sissy Road King with all that suspension bull crap or something like what I ride. Straight hard tail bobber seat! Vroom, Vroom... I feel every bump, small rock and crack.

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