Transgender Women In Trucking (Please Don't Laugh...not A Joke)

Topic 4704 | Page 2

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C. S.'s Comment
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Best Answer!

I guess I am wondering why people want to complicate their already complex decisions by entering a field that is filled with men who will NEVER on earth respect them. I was born female, am female and will stay female. I am not protected class. I am not lesbian. My mature age and gender are not given any special consideration at all by 98% of the male students at trucker school. Why should you or anyone with such an issue with gender identity expect BETTER treatment than those of us born and bred female by openly proclaiming your transgender status? Seems like the only place you would want to be open about it would be on the physical exam in privacy of doctor-patient relationship. All the laws on the books aren't going to change reality of the overwhelming majority of men driving the goods in this country or any other. Just being real with you.

I don't think the OP, or anyone else expects special treatment. They expect the same treatment as every other woman, (or man for that matter) who enters trucking. I am also biologically a woman, and I identify as one. If you're not treated well by your classmates at school, you need to stand up for yourself. The last time I checked, the ignition of a truck isn't phallus shaped. If by "special consideration" you mean special treatment, I don't see why you would want it. In fact I don't see anyone on this thread who wants special treatment, only equality.

By the way, you ARE a protected class. The EEOC also prohibits employment discrimination based on sex and age (among other things). Though this only applies to your employer, you are protected in this regard and should know your rights.

Regardless of your opinion on the matter, the laws are in place. What Desiree's trainer is doing is sexual harassment under the eyes of the law. I am not suggesting she sue, I am merely pointing out that her company would certainly like to know so that they can reprimand the trainer appropriately, and potentially avoid a large lawsuit from someone further down the line.

I guess I am wondering why people want to complicate their already complex decisions by entering a field that is filled with men who will NEVER on earth respect them.

Why did Marie Curie enter the field of physics? Why did Rosalind Franklin study DNA? Why did Rachel Carson write Silent Spring? Why did Mae Jemison enter space? Grace Hopper? Sally Ride? Florence Nightingale? The list goes on. These women all entered fields "filled with men who would NEVER on earth respect them". Maybe they did it because it was their calling. Maybe because they knew they could change the world. Maybe some even did it because they wanted to prove all the naysayers wrong.

By your logic, no woman should enter trucking (including you). For that matter, no woman should enter ANY field that is male-dominated (read: nearly all of them). To imply that transgender women (or men, for that matter) shouldn't even enter trucking? Why, because it will be hard? It's hard regardless, and I'm sure most people who are transgender have endured enough hardship to be able to stomach a little more in order to do what they love.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
December Hopeful's Comment
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I should never have expressed my observations about any of it. However, I would not go in the direction of comparing professional driving to finding medical cures or becoming an astronaut.

C. S.'s Comment
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I should never have expressed my observations about any of it. However, I would not go in the direction of comparing professional driving to finding medical cures or becoming an astronaut.

Why not? All are worthy, useful, honest careers. If you'd prefer a different comparison, there are plenty of women in construction, plumbing, automotive technology, and many other "blue collar" professions. I'm not trying to argue; it's clear you don't want to. But people who are transgender shouldn't be made to feel like they don't belong, especially on a website billed as "the most friendly and helpful trucker's forum anywhere".

Colleen W.'s Comment
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I guess I am wondering why people want to complicate their already complex decisions by entering a field that is filled with men who will NEVER on earth respect them. I was born female, am female and will stay female. I am not protected class. I am not lesbian. My mature age and gender are not given any special consideration at all by 98% of the male students at trucker school. Why should you or anyone with such an issue with gender identity expect BETTER treatment than those of us born and bred female by openly proclaiming your transgender status? Seems like the only place you would want to be open about it would be on the physical exam in privacy of doctor-patient relationship. All the laws on the books aren't going to change reality of the overwhelming majority of men driving the goods in this country or any other. Just being real with you.

Angi, I don't think anyone here is asking for better treatment. I think the concerned is being treated on equal ground and not discriminated against, however if you're a woman now why tell anyone about who you were in the past. Just because I've never felt I shouldn't have been a woman doesn't mean I don't want everyone to know all of my past. All professions have narrow-minded people in them. I was a paralegal and what I heard some of the lawyers say in private meetings could have gotten them and the company I worked for sued. My question is why give a rat's ass what people think, you're a woman that's all anyone needs to know.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
fatsy cline's Comment
member avatar

I guess I am wondering why people want to complicate their already complex decisions by entering a field that is filled with men who will NEVER on earth respect them. I was born female, am female and will stay female. I am not protected class. I am not lesbian. My mature age and gender are not given any special consideration at all by 98% of the male students at trucker school. Why should you or anyone with such an issue with gender identity expect BETTER treatment than those of us born and bred female by openly proclaiming your transgender status? Seems like the only place you would want to be open about it would be on the physical exam in privacy of doctor-patient relationship. All the laws on the books aren't going to change reality of the overwhelming majority of men driving the goods in this country or any other. Just being real with you.

This is a ridiculous response. If she wants to be a trucker and "complicate her already complex decision" she has the same rights and opportunities we all do. Did anyone tell you not to go into a male dominated field because you're old? And if they did, did it stop you? Not being sexually harrassed is NOT special treatment, it's the law and it's our RIGHT.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
December Hopeful's Comment
member avatar

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I should never have expressed my observations about any of it. However, I would not go in the direction of comparing professional driving to finding medical cures or becoming an astronaut.

double-quotes-end.png

Why not? All are worthy, useful, honest careers. If you'd prefer a different comparison, there are plenty of women in construction, plumbing, automotive technology, and many other "blue collar" professions. I'm not trying to argue; it's clear you don't want to. But people who are transgender shouldn't be made to feel like they don't belong, especially on a website billed as "the most friendly and helpful trucker's forum anywhere".

Again, I should never have been expressed my thoughts on this subject. I have had enough. Thank you for letting me alone over it now. I am truly sorry for participating in this discussion. Really very sorry.

Rachel A.'s Comment
member avatar
Great Answer!

I too am a mtf transgender trucker.i live 24/7 as a woman now. I've been driving like this for 2 weeks, and have been unconditionally accepted by the company I drive for. Out on the road, I have been treated very well, with only the occasional dirty look from the ignorant few that I encountered. I've been to shippers and receivers with no incident. Ignorance is out there, and I'm sure you will encounter some, but it is dwindling in prevalence, and hopefully it will be completely gone when the ignorant ones die off. If you do get your cdl , I think you will find a home out here on the road.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

DWI:

Driving While Intoxicated

Chris B.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

I am also transgender. 2 weeks into driving with a trainer for a major carrier to become a 48 state Otr driver. The one thing so far that I have experienced, is that even though I have a female trainer, she just can't see me as anything other than a male when I clearly do not presented as anything other than female. The one comment that I'm still trying to let go of is: "you just need to face the fact that you're a man and look like one". She's the only person I've heard that from in 10 years of transition. I don't feel I can say anything to the company and that if I ask to change trainers, I'll just end up sitting in a hotel room for weeks while one trainer after another rejects taking me onto their truck to finish the company training period. Already logged over 100 hours driving, I'm good at doing this and really looking forward to getting into my own truck & running loads. Any advice from others out there who may have already encountered this type of situation? I'm open to getting messaged directly I f it gets this career path moving for me. thanks :) -Des

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I can't tell you what to do in this situation; you have to decide that for yourself. However, know that what your trainer is doing constitutes sexual harassment. Perhaps tell her, in no uncertain terms, that you identify as woman (just as she does) and you would like her to respect that. After all, would it be appropriate if a male trainer was calling his male trainee "she" and referring to him as a woman? Of course not.

Ed and

It's not a hardship for your mentor to provide you with respect; in fact, it's basic human decency. Whether or not you put up with her juvenile behavior is up to you, and I wouldn't blame you for bearing it just until you get out on your own. However, I would encourage you to report her once you're off her truck. Regardless of her personal opinions, her comments to you are sexual harassment and I'm sure your employer would like to know about it. Most large companies have a zero-tolerance policy on issues like this.

I have worked many jobs that are male dominated and some men are just stubborn in their ways and will not change. Not to say that some women don't judge either because they do but I think men are worse. I have worked wth men who reminded me every day that women should not be allowed to do men's jobs. I have had women tell me I should just give up because they don't see why I want to do a job that a man should be doing anyway. You just can't win! I don't think we can get away from narrow minded people or people who want to judge people who are different than them. We are all different than each other. Not sure we will ever get to a place of non judgement by others. It's just the roulette wheel of life out there!

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Rachel A.'s Comment
member avatar

An update to my previous post. I just got on hormones, and had my license changed to female. I'm in the process of getting my name changed as well. Now if I can get Hirshbach to give me a consistently excellent pay like I got this week, my whole life will be changed for the better. My transition is going very well, imo.

Lilysmomma's Comment
member avatar

I personally have no prejudice against anyone but there are people who do.. As any place of employment, if you walk in looking different, they will probably pick on you. If you dress normally and represent the company you work for with the highest standards, you won't have a problem. I used to shuttle cars back and forth, fly into an airport and pick up a car from the owner, sign over the title and drive it home.., A very dangerous thing to do. I couldn't carry anything with me through the airport and in my bags so I had to make sure I exchanged the cashier's check and car in a place where a lot of people were.. On my way home with the car, I stopped at a store and picked up a can of wasp spray which sprays 25 feet. If anyone messed with me, they would get themselves a face full of spray.. I always stopped in well lit areas and looked like I knew where I was going and never looked down, look out and look like you are familiar with your surroundings.. and lastly, I always carried very little cash with me and kept it in my sock or in my bra.. no purses..

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