Qualcomm And Critical Events

Topic 527 | Page 1

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Dave D. (Armyman)'s Comment
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How many here have set off the "Critical Event" indicators on their Qualcomms?

A "Critical Event" would include "Hard Breaking" or "Hard Turn."

Also how close has anyone come to running out of driving hours while on E-Logs?

Mine is 15 minutes while in training, and just under 30 while on my own.

Dave

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.
Daniel B.'s Comment
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Once I went -1 minute on my clock. My first week. Bad day..

My trainer had me driving on his hours and I did trigger an alarm for skidding on a turn. I was going very slow but my steer tire lost friction for a few seconds. Was really no problem. But like I said he forced me to drive on his time so it wasn't on my name and he didnt notice because I instantly cleared it. I didn't want to hear him complain and yell like he always did, I knew what I did wrong.

Doug K.'s Comment
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I haven't set off any critical alarms but I do seem to run the edge on my hours. Closest I have been in 7 minutes on a multi stop load in Oregon and a couple of time have actually run out of time by just a few minutes. My company forgives those if you don't do it all the time. I have been told that after an hour everybody starts to have kittens. Other than than that time I usually have about one hour left at the end of a day.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
David's Comment
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I've gone past my hours.. I've had loads that drop and leave me with 2-3 hrs and then forced to sit and wait. which eats away after the 14 gets below the 11... I've had to send in messages on the QC to night dispatch letting them know I'll be leaving so and so and they don't allow overnight parking, and heading to this location or this location if the other isn't available. I also send a message when I've arrived to my safe haven. They only thing you really gotta watch is yourself and old smokey if he catches ya. You can also call for an escort if you need. Most of the times I've gone over is when I'm ready to head to the terminal for home time. like forest gump says "**** happens"

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

crazy rebel's Comment
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If im ever legal and in the regs with my e-logs im not drivin,i get a call bout once a day from my safety coordinator.im not proud of it its just i was raised and trained by old school truckers and i grew to only know that style of drivin.so put me on paper and ya will make lots of money as i will too.but there is alwaysthe costly mistake ya got to watch out for.

Lucky13's Comment
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During my OTR days I ran out the clock several times. I ran right up to 14 hours on-duty once just as I pulled into the entrance at the terminal in Memphis. I stopped the truck right away and switched to off-duty. Once ran right up to 14 hours on-duty delivering a load just outside of Austin, Tx. I got in a truly awful traffic jam going west on I-20 about 40 miles east of Dallas. There was a semi-trailer that caught fire and traffic was diverted onto 2 different state highways which immediately backed up for miles. I was going to try and shut down in Austin but there isn't squat for truck stops right in Austin. I delivered the load just as my clock ran out. Another time during my first month on the road I had to have a load repowered when my 14 hour on-duty clock ran out. A 2-hour live load turned into 4 hours, then I got lost on some country road in N.Carolina in the middle of the night. Not fun. The good thing was my company understood what happened after I told them straight up what was going on. I would advise any new driver to plan trips very carefully so as not to run out of hours before you can pick up or deliver your load. Whenever I could and it was permissible, I would try to shut down either at the shipper or receiver or really close so I would have maximum drive hours for the next load. With the presence of electronic logs , accurate trip planning becomes very, very important.

Electronic Logs:

Electronic Onboard Recorder

Electronic Logbook

A device which records the amount of time a vehicle has been driven. If the vehicle is not being driven, the operator will manually input whether or not he/she is on duty or not.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Jhill365's Comment
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I have gone over 2 hours on my 14 before at my old company because I was in Arkansas on I-40 where they have a 20 to 30 mile stretch that they are doing construction in. They have Jersey barriers creating only one lane each direction and someone had an accident in the middle of that, so to clear it, a tow truck had to back up to get to the wreck. I never heard a word about it, I just put in a note for safe haven and went to the first possible place to park.

Dave D. (Armyman)'s Comment
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I have gone over 2 hours on my 14 before at my old company because I was in Arkansas on I-40 where they have a 20 to 30 mile stretch that they are doing construction in. They have Jersey barriers creating only one lane each direction and someone had an accident in the middle of that, so to clear it, a tow truck had to back up to get to the wreck. I never heard a word about it, I just put in a note for safe haven and went to the first possible place to park.

I had to use the "Off Duty" "Safe Haven" driving this evening, and I didn't even leave town. I am in Russellville, and I had to pick up a load of meat, and I ran out of hours at the plant.

Dave

Tesserae's Comment
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Once. In dfw I ran an hour over my 14 to leave a shipper that didn't have overnite parking. The resulting conference call with safety,logs, and dispatch curtailed that behavior real quick like. Since then I've developed a mystical relationship with my qc. I frequently sacrifice hotdogs from TA to it, and it seems content to receive food offerings weekly. Sometimes ill burn some incense and dress it up like Cindy lauper. That's mostly during the lonely months of winter. I've been reading books on applied magic in an effort to get it to run my 70 backwards. I'll publish the details once results are achieved.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Brett Aquila's Comment
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Sometimes ill burn some incense and dress it up like Cindy lauper. That's mostly during the lonely months of winter.

rofl-2.gif That was great!!!

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