HOS Question

Topic 5787 | Page 1

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Jonathon H.'s Comment
member avatar

So im slightly confused. I stopped driving with only 1.7 hrs left on my 14. I parked and placed in the sleeper. After 8 hours my elog shows that I now have 8 hours and 43 minutes that I can drive on my 11 and 11 hours and 43 on my 14 hour clock. I have not yet reached my 10th consecutive hour, how do I have driving time regained. Maybe I am ooverlooking something.

Elog:

Electronic Onboard Recorder

Electronic Logbook

A device which records the amount of time a vehicle has been driven. If the vehicle is not being driven, the operator will manually input whether or not he/she is on duty or not.

Mikki 's Comment
member avatar

Just a guess I am not a driver yet. Did you have a 2 hour break earlier thereby giveing you split berth option?

Phil C.'s Comment
member avatar

I would guess it has to do with your the 7 day / 60 hour limit, or, the 8 day / 70 hour limit, found here:

https://www.truckingtruth.com/cdl-training-program/page93

Phil

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Chris M's Comment
member avatar

You took a 2 hour break prior to running the final 2 hours 17 minutes of your day.

When you take a 2 hour break, go on duty or driving, then take an 8 hour break, your 14 hour clock resets to the end of the 2 hour break.

In essence you gain back whatever time you did before the 2 hour break. If you did not take a 2 hour break, then after 8 hours you would have whatever time was on your 14 hour clock the minute that the 8 hour break started. An 8 hour break will pause your 14 hour clock back to the point of that break starting if you did not incorporate a 2 hour break prior to it.

In reference to the 7/60 or 8/70 clock, if it was a case of running low on this clock, then after a 10 hour break you would only have the hours that are left on the 60 or 70 clock available to you.

The only way to "gain" hours after an 8 hour break is to have taken a 2 hour break somewhere within the current 14 hours.

AJ D.'s Comment
member avatar

You took a 2 hour break prior to running the final 2 hours 17 minutes of your day.

When you take a 2 hour break, go on duty or driving, then take an 8 hour break, your 14 hour clock resets to the end of the 2 hour break.

In essence you gain back whatever time you did before the 2 hour break. If you did not take a 2 hour break, then after 8 hours you would have whatever time was on your 14 hour clock the minute that the 8 hour break started. An 8 hour break will pause your 14 hour clock back to the point of that break starting if you did not incorporate a 2 hour break prior to it.

In reference to the 7/60 or 8/70 clock, if it was a case of running low on this clock, then after a 10 hour break you would only have the hours that are left on the 60 or 70 clock available to you.

The only way to "gain" hours after an 8 hour break is to have taken a 2 hour break somewhere within the current 14 hours.

I think I'm getting a headache... I better start studying HOS !! lol

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Chris A.'s Comment
member avatar

All new to me as well. Just completed 18 days of being with a trainer, of the required 21 before getting my own truck, with a major flatbed carrier out of Tulsa, Oklahoma. Myself and the trainer couldn't get together on a clear understanding of the HOS rules. At one point, I was driving the truck and nearing the end of my 14 hours. (Within 8 minutes, I believe). Please understand, the trainer had the QUALCOMM in his hands. I was not near the end of my 11 hours drive time, just close to the 14 hour clock expiring. When informed of my remaining time before I would be in violation and asked what I would do, I stated, "I will exit here, turn right towards that McDonald's and park the truck, say good night and start again tomorrow." Trainer informed me to proceed through the intersection when the traffic light changed and get back on the on ramp. I did so, pulled over safely and set the parking brake. When I did, he went bezerk, asked me why I set the brake? He said, "why did you do that? Whenever you set the brake, it pings the truck and they can see where we are at." At this point and still not understanding, I continued to drive as he said, "I've got this and we're driving to Hagerstown, Maryland to get some fried chicken. I did and we did. Good student right? Apparently what he did was to go back in the log, change/edit my start time (on-duty) from approx. 7:46 a.m. to approx. 9:30 (something) a.m. Later on duty time, later stop driving time, correct? Mind you, he did this nearly 14 hours later ... correct, legal, ethical? Confused is all. Cost me my job as I told him I couldn't continue to do things like that ... this was the second time seeing the electronic log edited. When I questioned the trainer if this was legal, he said "it wasn't really illegal." When I asked, if I hit and killed someone on the highway, would the DOT think it was illegal? He stated, and I quote, "Probably not, they are people too." He kept insisting that if we do not mess with the driving line on the electronic log, we've done nothing illegal. I said, okay, but for what other reason, other than to extend my driving time today, would I edit the log some 14 hours (close) later? I got no answer. He stated and again I quote. "If you run legal, you will not make any money and Melton will not keep you for lack of production." Then stated. "Melton wants you to run legal. I am completely confused and wonder did I screw up royally? Blow a completely good career? Would appreciate some good information.

Thanks,

Chris

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Joe S. (a.k.a. The Blue 's Comment
member avatar

I have been told that this is a "glitch" in the Qualcomm system. I have noticed mine doing the same thing. When I asked about it, I was told that something in the system reads that you have had your break.

To really know if your clock has been reset is to look at the "summary" tab on the screen. It shows your total hours.

Keep it safe out here, the life you save might be your own. The Blue Angel.

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.
The Persian Conversion's Comment
member avatar

All new to me as well. Just completed 18 days of being with a trainer, of the required 21 before getting my own truck, with a major flatbed carrier out of Tulsa, Oklahoma. Myself and the trainer couldn't get together on a clear understanding of the HOS rules. At one point, I was driving the truck and nearing the end of my 14 hours. (Within 8 minutes, I believe). Please understand, the trainer had the QUALCOMM in his hands. I was not near the end of my 11 hours drive time, just close to the 14 hour clock expiring. When informed of my remaining time before I would be in violation and asked what I would do, I stated, "I will exit here, turn right towards that McDonald's and park the truck, say good night and start again tomorrow." Trainer informed me to proceed through the intersection when the traffic light changed and get back on the on ramp. I did so, pulled over safely and set the parking brake. When I did, he went bezerk, asked me why I set the brake? He said, "why did you do that? Whenever you set the brake, it pings the truck and they can see where we are at." At this point and still not understanding, I continued to drive as he said, "I've got this and we're driving to Hagerstown, Maryland to get some fried chicken. I did and we did. Good student right? Apparently what he did was to go back in the log, change/edit my start time (on-duty) from approx. 7:46 a.m. to approx. 9:30 (something) a.m. Later on duty time, later stop driving time, correct? Mind you, he did this nearly 14 hours later ... correct, legal, ethical? Confused is all. Cost me my job as I told him I couldn't continue to do things like that ... this was the second time seeing the electronic log edited. When I questioned the trainer if this was legal, he said "it wasn't really illegal." When I asked, if I hit and killed someone on the highway, would the DOT think it was illegal? He stated, and I quote, "Probably not, they are people too." He kept insisting that if we do not mess with the driving line on the electronic log, we've done nothing illegal. I said, okay, but for what other reason, other than to extend my driving time today, would I edit the log some 14 hours (close) later? I got no answer. He stated and again I quote. "If you run legal, you will not make any money and Melton will not keep you for lack of production." Then stated. "Melton wants you to run legal. I am completely confused and wonder did I screw up royally? Blow a completely good career? Would appreciate some good information.

Thanks,

Chris

Chris,

Read Brett's book on this forum, starting with chapter 10, but more specifically the sections starting at chapter 11, here. This will perfectly explain the balancing act companies expect from you.

To run legal or not to run legal? That is the question.

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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