Beginning Truck Driver Pay

Topic 5960 | Page 1

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David C.'s Comment
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I recently heard on the radio about National truck driving school. Their advertisement states that truck drivers can start out at $60,000.00 a year . If this is true what can an experienced driver of 5 or 6 years make? If this is not true what can a new driver expect to make in the first year .

Gary E.'s Comment
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I recently heard on the radio about National truck driving school. Their advertisement states that truck drivers can start out at $60,000.00 a year . If this is true what can an experienced driver of 5 or 6 years make? If this is not true what can a new driver expect to make in the first year .

$32,000-$42,000 gross seems to be low to high end in your first year. $60,000 is just a draw in to get the recruiters numbers up in the case of inexperienced drivers. Yes, as time goes by $60,000 is not impossible but don't expect this until you have some good experience behind you and a developed, good relationship with a good dispatcher.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Brian 's Comment
member avatar

I recently heard on the radio about National truck driving school. Their advertisement states that truck drivers can start out at $60,000.00 a year . If this is true what can an experienced driver of 5 or 6 years make? If this is not true what can a new driver expect to make in the first year .

Also depends on your area, I'm in Minnesota, and depending on the type of freight-dry van, reefer , dedicated, tanker, etc. The pay scale can vary a lot. I have been offers from several large companies ranging from low 40's to mid 60's ...... but the higher paid jobs are require a lot of stops and hands on unloading of freight.

I am looking at taking an offer of 48k average to start..... .35 CPM , plus a $5000 sign on bonus, and tuition reimbursement since I paid the $4000 myself for school, this is a dedicated route that puts me on the road 5 days out, and 2 days home. Keeps me in a 6 state area delivering to Walmart stores.

Dedicated Route:

A driver or carrier who transports cargo between regular, prescribed routes. Normally it means a driver will be dedicated to working for one particular customer like Walmart or Home Depot and they will only haul freight for that customer. You'll often hear drivers say something like, "I'm on the Walmart dedicated account."

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
I am looking at taking an offer of 48k average to start..... .35 CPM , plus a $5000 sign on bonus, and tuition reimbursement since I paid the $4000 myself for school, this is a dedicated route that puts me on the road 5 days out, and 2 days home. Keeps me in a 6 state area delivering to Walmart stores.

Are you including the sign-on bonus in your $48k figure cuz I don't think you're making $48k on 35 cents per mile and getting home on weekends. You would have to run 137,000 miles per year at that rate to make 48k and I don't see that happening on a dedicated regional Walmart run. The numbers are mathematically possible, but not likely. That's a ton of miles.

The average first year pay for most people is normally around $32k-$36k because you'll spend the first month or two in training where you won't make as much.

Dedicated Route:

A driver or carrier who transports cargo between regular, prescribed routes. Normally it means a driver will be dedicated to working for one particular customer like Walmart or Home Depot and they will only haul freight for that customer. You'll often hear drivers say something like, "I'm on the Walmart dedicated account."

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Woody's Comment
member avatar

One of the few exceptions to the 32 to 36k is if you can get into an LTL company driving linehaul. Normally you had to have experience to get into these jobs but some are now even hiring right out of school. Iv'e made over $30,000 in my first 6 months and that actually included almost 4 weeks of training since I had less than 1yr experience when I started. But our training pay is WAY out of the normal pay range. I was actually paid as if I were running the loads on my own, and was getting lots of miles since I was being trained by senior drivers on their runs.

Woody

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.
Justin N.'s Comment
member avatar

Are you including the sign-on bonus in your $48k figure cuz I don't think you're making $48k on 35 cents per mile and getting home on weekends. You would have to run 137,000 miles per year at that rate to make 48k and I don't see that happening on a dedicated regional Walmart run. The numbers are mathematically possible, but not likely. That's a ton of miles.

The average first year pay for most people is normally around $32k-$36k because you'll spend the first month or two in training where you won't make as much.

Being a dedicated route he is likely also paid per stop and unloading of product.

I have dedicated route like that which pays 37 cpm , $10 a stop, and about $100 for all the unloading per trailer full. Adds up to about $54k a year.

I got this route after my first six months of driving.

Dedicated Route:

A driver or carrier who transports cargo between regular, prescribed routes. Normally it means a driver will be dedicated to working for one particular customer like Walmart or Home Depot and they will only haul freight for that customer. You'll often hear drivers say something like, "I'm on the Walmart dedicated account."

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Brian 's Comment
member avatar
double-quotes-start.png

I am looking at taking an offer of 48k average to start..... .35 CPM , plus a $5000 sign on bonus, and tuition reimbursement since I paid the $4000 myself for school, this is a dedicated route that puts me on the road 5 days out, and 2 days home. Keeps me in a 6 state area delivering to Walmart stores.

double-quotes-end.png

Are you including the sign-on bonus in your $48k figure cuz I don't think you're making $48k on 35 cents per mile and getting home on weekends. You would have to run 137,000 miles per year at that rate to make 48k and I don't see that happening on a dedicated regional Walmart run. The numbers are mathematically possible, but not likely. That's a ton of miles.

The average first year pay for most people is normally around $32k-$36k because you'll spend the first month or two in training where you won't make as much.

Guess I'll find out when I get to orientation, but according to the recruiter average 2400 miles per week, starting at .35 with raises at 3,6,9 & 12 months, plus fuel, safety & productivity bonus.....without raises and bonus still comes in at over 43,500 - but training is less for up to 275 hours

500 miles a day, 5 days a week isn't that tough is it? Its all drop & hook according to recruiters.....and your home time is a 34 hour re-start so you drive 10-11 hours per day.....I know the recruiters are trying to get new drivers, but if the pay is in writing, then it must be correct?

Dedicated Route:

A driver or carrier who transports cargo between regular, prescribed routes. Normally it means a driver will be dedicated to working for one particular customer like Walmart or Home Depot and they will only haul freight for that customer. You'll often hear drivers say something like, "I'm on the Walmart dedicated account."

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

6 string rhythm's Comment
member avatar

Like Woody said, LTL is an exception. I would not be surprised if I hit 70-80k my rookie year.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier
6 string rhythm's Comment
member avatar

To clarify, I'm linehaul - not P&D.

P&D:

Pickup & Delivery

Local drivers that stay around their area, usually within 100 mile radius of a terminal, picking up and delivering loads.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers for instance will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.
Brian 's Comment
member avatar

Like Woody said, LTL is an exception. I would not be surprised if I hit 70-80k my rookie year.

Awesome!!!!

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier
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