Thinking About Driving A Big Rig But Don't Want To Live On The Road Forever?

Topic 6435 | Page 1

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TCB's Comment
member avatar

I know there are a lot of people pondering the idea of learning how to drive a big rig. I was one of them. Time away from home, friends, and family are a deal killer for many people. I thought I would share my situation to shed some light on the topic. Go to a company sponsored CDL program.(PRIME, INC has a good program that gives you some solo exp as well--but I would not advise working there long term) Within 6 months I had my CDL and the experience I needed to score a sweet local driving job M-F nights and weekends off making good money. Take it seriously, run hard, drive as much as you can. (they will give you a road test and assess your driving maturity) If you are a good, safe driver who makes their deliveries on time, you will find the position that works for you. Just keep calling companies until you find the right job for you. The smaller companies tend to treat their drivers better and are more concerned with your personal happiness. This industry is booming and there are tons of opportunities for good drivers. Many companies are providing many new driving options such as 7days on/7 days off, 14/7, 7/3, 7/4, 14/3, etc.... Good luck!!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Rolling Thunder's Comment
member avatar

I know there are a lot of people pondering the idea of learning how to drive a big rig. I was one of them. Time away from home, friends, and family are a deal killer for many people. I thought I would share my situation to shed some light on the topic. Go to a company sponsored CDL program.(PRIME, INC has a good program that gives you some solo exp as well--but I would not advise working there long term) Within 6 months I had my CDL and the experience I needed to score a sweet local driving job M-F nights and weekends off making good money. Take it seriously, run hard, drive as much as you can. (they will give you a road test and assess your driving maturity) If you are a good, safe driver who makes their deliveries on time, you will find the position that works for you. Just keep calling companies until you find the right job for you. The smaller companies tend to treat their drivers better and are more concerned with your personal happiness. This industry is booming and there are tons of opportunities for good drivers. Many companies are providing many new driving options such as 7days on/7 days off, 14/7, 7/3, 7/4, 14/3, etc.... Good luck!!

Are you saying that`s all the s**t floating around in your head?

Hi TCB and welcome.

If it is then I would suggest you take a step back, clear your mind and let what you read on hear soak in a bit. There are a variety of ways to get into trucking, but for the sake of your and our health, do not pursue this lifestyle looking for a "job". You may be hearing that this industry is booming, well, not really. Are there driving positions open? Yep. The problem is that the industry is constantly being flooded by the results of CDL mills. This means there are potential drivers being thrown into the mix without even the basic knowledge needed to survive, much less thrive being a truck driver.

This is a difficult, yet, rewarding way to earn a living.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
TCB's Comment
member avatar

I am sorry Thunder, I do not understand your grammar. I do know that the company I now work for understands that there is a new breed of driver. One that appreciates the joys of home and family. The days of "Old School" truckers taking illegal drugs, running dual logs, and not bathing are almost a memory. I am just trying to motivate a new generation to try some new things. I do agree that these CDL mills are turning out a lot of drivers right now, but remember back in the day it was easy to get your CDL with virtually no training. Now it is a process and you do have to pass all the requirements. Lets try to motivate on here instead of the trucker negativity that we are trying to overcome. Oh, and yes in Texas, Driving Careers are booming. Obviously you have to be safe and care about what you do. Lets promote this as a job,career, or whatever you need it to be.....

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Rolling Thunder's Comment
member avatar

I am sorry Thunder, I do not understand your grammar. I do know that the company I now work for understands that there is a new breed of driver. One that appreciates the joys of home and family. The days of "Old School" truckers taking illegal drugs, running dual logs, and not bathing are almost a memory. I am just trying to motivate a new generation to try some new things. I do agree that these CDL mills are turning out a lot of drivers right now, but remember back in the day it was easy to get your CDL with virtually no training. Now it is a process and you do have to pass all the requirements. Lets try to motivate on here instead of the trucker negativity that we are trying to overcome. Oh, and yes in Texas, Driving Careers are booming. Obviously you have to be safe and care about what you do. Lets promote this as a job,career, or whatever you need it to be.....

Okay, congratulations, you just insulted almost every truck driver that has been delivering since deregulation in the early 80`s and many more prior to then.

You came to this site to "motivate a new generation to try some new things" . Well, with all do respect (maybe) kiss my and all of my fellow truckers` asses. Do you understand that "grammar"?

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Rolling Thunder's Comment
member avatar

"...with all due"...

ButtonUp's Comment
member avatar

I think the bottom line is that for individuals who possess the determination and ability, and are qualified with respect to health, driving, and legal histories, there are many options in the trucking industry besides living in a truck for months at a time. That's why I started... A lot of it depends on where you live, or are willing to relocate to, but the opportunities are there, as many of us here can verify since we're working home daily gigs.

David's Comment
member avatar

One thatpalppreciates the joys olhe days of "Old School" truckers taking illegal drugs, running dual logs and not bathing are almost a memory.

this hasn't been much of an issue since the early 80-90s. Other then those who just don't care about hygiene and don't have on board computers for log management...

Now it is a process and you do have to pass all the requirements

There's a reason for that.. I feel safer knowing the driver next to has had proper training and passed state exams to own a CDL

Yes you can land a local gig after 6 months or even sooner depending on the company's, however doing long haul is a lifestyle. There are those, such as yourself who can't handle it and go local or find a completely different career.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Heavy C's Comment
member avatar

I Really don't understand anything your trying to say. I paid for my own private school, got my cdl , got pre hires from national companies and went local with zero experience. There are many ways to get into this industry and different ways to succeed. But to say that only local is the only good choice is terrible. For many people otr is this best thing for them. And to say that the big companies don't care about their drivers it's being plain ignorant.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Pre Hire:

What Exactly Is A Pre-Hire Letter?

Pre-hire letters are acceptance letters from trucking companies to students, or even potential students, to verify placement. The trucking companies are saying in writing that the student, or potential student, appears to meet the company's minimum hiring requirements and is welcome to attend their orientation at the company’s expense once he or she graduates from truck driving school and has their CDL in hand.

We have an excellent article that will help you Understand The Pre-Hire Process.

A Pre-Hire Letter Is Not A Guarantee Of Employment

The people that receive a pre-hire letter are people who meet the company's minimum hiring requirements, but it is not an employment contract. It is an invitation to orientation, and the orientation itself is a prerequisite to employment.

During the orientation you will get a physical, drug screen, and background check done. These and other qualifications must be met before someone in orientation is officially hired.

Pre Hires:

What Exactly Is A Pre-Hire Letter?

Pre-hire letters are acceptance letters from trucking companies to students, or even potential students, to verify placement. The trucking companies are saying in writing that the student, or potential student, appears to meet the company's minimum hiring requirements and is welcome to attend their orientation at the company’s expense once he or she graduates from truck driving school and has their CDL in hand.

We have an excellent article that will help you Understand The Pre-Hire Process.

A Pre-Hire Letter Is Not A Guarantee Of Employment

The people that receive a pre-hire letter are people who meet the company's minimum hiring requirements, but it is not an employment contract. It is an invitation to orientation, and the orientation itself is a prerequisite to employment.

During the orientation you will get a physical, drug screen, and background check done. These and other qualifications must be met before someone in orientation is officially hired.

Justin N.'s Comment
member avatar

Ha, i have stepped into the TruckersReport it looks like!

nomad girl's Comment
member avatar

I don't have my own family so otr life is definitely for me. I love living on the road. Never have to worry about taking home time because I don't really need it.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

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