For Those Heading To Prime For Training...

Topic 6467 | Page 1

Page 1 of 1
Michael W.'s Comment
member avatar

When you call their number, do not use your recruiter's extension. Use the main switchboard operator to physically transfer the call. The extension seems to depoit a caller right to voice mail, while I have never failed to get through using the operator. Just an FYI.

Doing that will cut hours of time/waiting and some frustration (and worry) from your life.

Other than that, Prime is pretty smooth to deal with. They were up front and honest about everything (I have ropevious experience from the 1990's, so I knew what would be true, omitted, or outright false. I knew which questions to ask,b ut only got to ask one; they answered all the rest on their own. They even added information about which I forgot to ask. It was quite easy to forget I was talking to a recruiter.

If the restof training is that way (mainly), this is gonna be fun!

Terry C.'s Comment
member avatar

Did they go into detail about home time for company drivers?? They'll tell you the policy is 1 day home for 7 days worked. But not that days you work over 21 or 28 don't carry over. IE if you stay out 25 days you get 3 days off earned. The extra 4 you had over the 21 don't carry over to the next trip. You lose them.

If anyone else had it different, I'd like to know.

Michael W.'s Comment
member avatar

Did they go into detail about home time for company drivers?? They'll tell you the policy is 1 day home for 7 days worked. But not that days you work over 21 or 28 don't carry over. IE if you stay out 25 days you get 3 days off earned. The extra 4 you had over the 21 don't carry over to the next trip. You lose them.

If anyone else had it different, I'd like to know.

I can only state what I know about their (intended) training. Expect to be out and away from "home" the ENTIRE time. You might be fortunate to have a trainer who either live in your general area OR decides he/she will sacrifice their own home time for yours. However, do not count on that. That breed is rare; very rare.

Prime it mainly OTR; expect that lifestyle (nomadic). Old School, really. 3 - 6 weeks out, even after going solo. It also depends on where you live! if you live in traditioanlyl heavy freight areas (ie, major urban areas) AND close enough to their terminals, you will probably get home more often than those who do not; even when you don't wanna. Expect, however to be gone 4 - 6 weeks at ashot most of the time, epecially during high-frieght times of the year. Training? You'll likely be gone the entire time, unless your trainer is a rare type to sacrifice their own home time OR lives close enough to allow you the same hometime.

I do not know about theri regional/local opportunities. All I have dis\covered thus far is: they have those, but it's very VERY rare. I do see, however, they do not have a lot of complaints against them, overall. Even former drivers seem to miss them, even if they are working elsewhere at the time.

I fyou want more hometime (week out, weekends in, or home nightly), then spend the year sucking it up at Prime, then switch to what you NEED to do. Right now, do what you HAVE to do.

Beyond that, I cannot advise or even posit a guess. Perhaps someone else more experienced with Prime's real world operations can chime in.

Mike

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Michael W.'s Comment
member avatar

Please forgive all my typoes. I somehow got rid of the spell check on this browser. I will take care of that right now. LOL

The Dude's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

Did they go into detail about home time for company drivers?? They'll tell you the policy is 1 day home for 7 days worked. But not that days you work over 21 or 28 don't carry over. IE if you stay out 25 days you get 3 days off earned. The extra 4 you had over the 21 don't carry over to the next trip. You lose them.

If anyone else had it different, I'd like to know.

double-quotes-end.png

I can only state what I know about their (intended) training. Expect to be out and away from "home" the ENTIRE time. You might be fortunate to have a trainer who either live in your general area OR decides he/she will sacrifice their own home time for yours. However, do not count on that. That breed is rare; very rare.

Prime it mainly OTR; expect that lifestyle (nomadic). Old School, really. 3 - 6 weeks out, even after going solo. It also depends on where you live! if you live in traditioanlyl heavy freight areas (ie, major urban areas) AND close enough to their terminals, you will probably get home more often than those who do not; even when you don't wanna. Expect, however to be gone 4 - 6 weeks at ashot most of the time, epecially during high-frieght times of the year. Training? You'll likely be gone the entire time, unless your trainer is a rare type to sacrifice their own home time OR lives close enough to allow you the same hometime.

I do not know about theri regional/local opportunities. All I have dis\covered thus far is: they have those, but it's very VERY rare. I do see, however, they do not have a lot of complaints against them, overall. Even former drivers seem to miss them, even if they are working elsewhere at the time.

I fyou want more hometime (week out, weekends in, or home nightly), then spend the year sucking it up at Prime, then switch to what you NEED to do. Right now, do what you HAVE to do.

Beyond that, I cannot advise or even posit a guess. Perhaps someone else more experienced with Prime's real world operations can chime in.

Mike

Just want to touch on a few specifics with this post.

It's my understanding that the mid-west and southeast regional divisions are easy to get into, whereas there is a Texas regional that has a short waiting list. These drivers get home more often.

I don't know if getting home before going solo is THAT rare. They seem to always try to get drivers home after their first couple weeks of TNT.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

TNT:

Trainer-N-Trainee

Prime Inc has their own CDL training program and it's divided into two phases - PSD and TNT.

The PSD (Prime Student Driver) phase is where you'll get your permit and then go on the road for 10,000 miles with a trainer. When you come back you'll get your CDL license and enter the TNT phase.

The TNT phase is the second phase of training where you'll go on the road with an experienced driver for 30,000 miles of team driving. You'll receive 14¢ per mile ($700 per week guaranteed) during this phase. Once you're finished with TNT training you will be assigned a truck to run solo.

Michael W.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

Did they go into detail about home time for company drivers?? They'll tell you the policy is 1 day home for 7 days worked. But not that days you work over 21 or 28 don't carry over. IE if you stay out 25 days you get 3 days off earned. The extra 4 you had over the 21 don't carry over to the next trip. You lose them.

If anyone else had it different, I'd like to know.

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

I can only state what I know about their (intended) training. Expect to be out and away from "home" the ENTIRE time. You might be fortunate to have a trainer who either live in your general area OR decides he/she will sacrifice their own home time for yours. However, do not count on that. That breed is rare; very rare.

Prime it mainly OTR; expect that lifestyle (nomadic). Old School, really. 3 - 6 weeks out, even after going solo. It also depends on where you live! if you live in traditioanlyl heavy freight areas (ie, major urban areas) AND close enough to their terminals, you will probably get home more often than those who do not; even when you don't wanna. Expect, however to be gone 4 - 6 weeks at ashot most of the time, epecially during high-frieght times of the year. Training? You'll likely be gone the entire time, unless your trainer is a rare type to sacrifice their own home time OR lives close enough to allow you the same hometime.

I do not know about theri regional/local opportunities. All I have dis\covered thus far is: they have those, but it's very VERY rare. I do see, however, they do not have a lot of complaints against them, overall. Even former drivers seem to miss them, even if they are working elsewhere at the time.

I fyou want more hometime (week out, weekends in, or home nightly), then spend the year sucking it up at Prime, then switch to what you NEED to do. Right now, do what you HAVE to do.

Beyond that, I cannot advise or even posit a guess. Perhaps someone else more experienced with Prime's real world operations can chime in.

Mike

double-quotes-end.png

Just want to touch on a few specifics with this post.

It's my understanding that the mid-west and southeast regional divisions are easy to get into, whereas there is a Texas regional that has a short waiting list. These drivers get home more often.

I don't know if getting home before going solo is THAT rare. They seem to always try to get drivers home after their first couple weeks of TNT.

Nice! Is that a choice, or do they force home time that soon?

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

TNT:

Trainer-N-Trainee

Prime Inc has their own CDL training program and it's divided into two phases - PSD and TNT.

The PSD (Prime Student Driver) phase is where you'll get your permit and then go on the road for 10,000 miles with a trainer. When you come back you'll get your CDL license and enter the TNT phase.

The TNT phase is the second phase of training where you'll go on the road with an experienced driver for 30,000 miles of team driving. You'll receive 14¢ per mile ($700 per week guaranteed) during this phase. Once you're finished with TNT training you will be assigned a truck to run solo.

PR aka Road Hog's Comment
member avatar

Did they go into detail about home time for company drivers?? They'll tell you the policy is 1 day home for 7 days worked. But not that days you work over 21 or 28 don't carry over. IE if you stay out 25 days you get 3 days off earned. The extra 4 you had over the 21 don't carry over to the next trip. You lose them.

If anyone else had it different, I'd like to know.

I drove for prime, and yes you accrue 1 day for each 7 out. Home time cannot be any longer than 4 days, though did me good once or twice when I need it and got extra. The do accrue, so you can use them whenever, Mine never expired.

As far as training, company policy is no home time until you go solo, and you will go with a load. My Dispatcher was pretty cool, and always got me into town a day or so early, allowing me extra free time. Also, any day you drive any portion of the load, counts as a drive day. So say my home time is scheduled mon-thurs, my dispatcher will try to get me a load delivering Sunday. Sometimes, morning, sometimes evening, but almost always a day early.

As far as getting by home, I wouldn't count on it. I live in Atlanta, Ga but as a rule my dispatcher kept me everywhere but the South East. Now, I've also talked to other driver's that said differently, so maybe it varies by dispatcher.

As far as actually taking home time? that really is entirely up to you, and yes, you can go home every 4 weeks, (minimum time out for Prime). But keep in mind your pay is directly related to your miles, as is your dispatcher's pay. The difference is you Dispatcher might have 45 drivers on his / her board. Now if you take home time every 4 weeks, you might 'slip down' the list of your dispatcher better drivers. I usually took home time every 6-8 weeks. Another thing to consider, is if you take 4 days off every month, thats the equivalent of taking 6-7 weeks off per year. That could make the difference of a 37K annually, or only 30K.

Finally, Prime does not have regional routes, though they did have me on somewhat of a schedule as far as places I went. Indy was popular, Maine, Massachusetts, Virginia, Nashville, Michigan, Dallas, Houston, Idaho - Potatoes, California LA and Santa Maria - produce., Utah, New Jersey .... well you get the idea. By the time you finish training and start solo, you will start going .... I remember this place..... And say hello to the Nestle bunny for me.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Page 1 of 1

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More