Hazard Lights At Railroad Crossings

Topic 6855 | Page 2

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Tman's Comment
member avatar

Here is the info from the PA CDL Manual

RaIlRoad CrossIng Before reaching the crossing, all commercial drivers should: • decelerate, brake smoothly and shift gears as necessary. • Look and listen for the presence of trains. • check traffic in all directions. do not stop, change gears, pass another vehicle or change lanes while any part of your vehicle is in the crossing. If you are driving a bus, a school bus or a vehicle displaying placards, you should be prepared to observe the following procedures at every railroad crossing (unless the crossing is exempt): • As the vehicle approaches a railroad crossing, activate the 4-way flashers. • Stop the vehicle within 50 feet but not less than 15 feet from the nearest rail. • Listen and look in both directions along the track for an approaching train and for signals indicating the approach of a train. If operating a bus, you may also be required to open the window and door prior to crossing the tracks. • Keep hands on the steering wheel as the vehicle crosses the tracks. • do not stop, change gears or change lanes while any part of your vehicle is proceeding across the tracks. • Four-way flashers should be deactivated after the vehicle crosses the tracks.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Bart's Comment
member avatar

Is blinker juice that expensive nowdays? I'll throw my hazards on if I'm coming up on slow traffic! Costs nothing and let's my tailgaters know what I'm doing. I know a driver who got a preventable in a rear ender for not flashing in heavy traffic. Throw the switch when it is appropriate never hurts to be safe.

B. Scott's Comment
member avatar
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Also if you have only a permit you should not be driving with a Hazmat you only get a Hazmat when you apply and send in fingerprints and and pass your final road test not to mention written test at the DMV its a Homeland Security Background check and that would be my evidence since I got a Hazmat cost about $160 I hope your not driving without one and your hauling Jet A fuel you get caught you can kiss your permit goodbye and get a hefty fine and probably lose your chance at getting your license for quite sometime dont mean to be so harsh but tell your company you might save them some money

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Thank you for the quick response. No, I'm not driving any HAZMAT vehicles personally yet, just a flatbed with air brakes. Like I said, I've heard people say that hazard lights need to be on, but I haven't been able to find anywhere that actually says I have to do it. Doesn't cost me anything to throw the switch, I was just wondering if it was actually required.

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In the training program offered by this site. It has all the details for hasmat loads. I would suggest studying it. It will only help give you the right info. Operate as if you are in the strictest state at all times. It will only help you be safer. Other drivers info may be wrong, its not always their intent to be wrong. Information just get twisted. One of my highschool teachers taught us this by telling the first person in the class the homework assignment. When it got to the end it was way off. He didn't warn the class on what he was doing. It started as a 500 word essay on a historical figure of your choice. It ended by being a 600 word essay with historical significants. As being the last one to hear this.....my simple thought was WTF!? Still remember that to this day as how information can get twisted without someones intention to twist it.

I have used the highroad twice- the first time I got my HAZMAT endorsement- as well as my permit, tanker, combo, and air brakes. The second time after they lapsed. It is not mentioned in the HAZMAT section, but it also warns "The hazardous material transportation information in this section reflects all revisions as of October 2009. This section contains partial information relative to the hazardous material requirements. The purpose of this section is to prepare an individual for the CDL hazardous material test. It should not be used for the hazardous material recurrent training. For detailed hazardous material transportation information, consult the regulations."

I agree with what you've said about viva voce which is why I came directly to the place where the pros are. I didn't know if it had been updated since 2009 or if it may have been something that was not covered in this partial review. I didn't read anything about it in my states manual either, it was a curiosity and I thought maybe someone on this site would have a definitive yes or no with proof as to weather this was required, a common practice, or if anyone had even heard of it at all. I suppose I'll look up the regulations, but I suspect, given the lack of proof, that throwing hazard lights sits somewhere between "common practice" and "never heard of it".

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DMV:

Department of Motor Vehicles, Bureau of Motor Vehicles

The state agency that handles everything related to your driver's licences, including testing, issuance, transfers, and revocation.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

B. Scott's Comment
member avatar

Here is the info from the PA CDL Manual

RaIlRoad CrossIng Before reaching the crossing, all commercial drivers should: • decelerate, brake smoothly and shift gears as necessary. • Look and listen for the presence of trains. • check traffic in all directions. do not stop, change gears, pass another vehicle or change lanes while any part of your vehicle is in the crossing. If you are driving a bus, a school bus or a vehicle displaying placards, you should be prepared to observe the following procedures at every railroad crossing (unless the crossing is exempt): • As the vehicle approaches a railroad crossing, activate the 4-way flashers. • Stop the vehicle within 50 feet but not less than 15 feet from the nearest rail. • Listen and look in both directions along the track for an approaching train and for signals indicating the approach of a train. If operating a bus, you may also be required to open the window and door prior to crossing the tracks. • Keep hands on the steering wheel as the vehicle crosses the tracks. • do not stop, change gears or change lanes while any part of your vehicle is proceeding across the tracks. • Four-way flashers should be deactivated after the vehicle crosses the tracks.

Awesome! Thank you Tman, This is the information I was looking for!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

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