Hazard Lights At Railroad Crossings

Topic 6855 | Page 1

Page 1 of 2 Next Page Go To Page:
B. Scott's Comment
member avatar

Where I work has a lot of differing opinions about what is and is not correct and being very new to this (only have my permit), I've been trying to weed through some of the opinion and get to the facts.

Which leads me to this question: Are HAZMAT tankers (JET-A specifically) required to use their hazard lights when they come to a stop at a railroad? I had one driver tell me that if you don't you can have your license pulled for 6 months and while I've been trying to google it nothing has come up.

Any of the pros on here have the real answer with evidence to back it up? Thank you in advance :)

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

Christopher J.'s Comment
member avatar

Where I work has a lot of differing opinions about what is and is not correct and being very new to this (only have my permit), I've been trying to weed through some of the opinion and get to the facts.

Which leads me to this question: Are HAZMAT tankers (JET-A specifically) required to use their hazard lights when they come to a stop at a railroad? I had one driver tell me that if you don't you can have your license pulled for 6 months and while I've been trying to google it nothing has come up.

Any of the pros on here have the real answer with evidence to back it up? Thank you in advance :)

absolutely Jet A Fuel for planes ah yeah and you stop about 50 ft before the tracks roll down windows turn off all noise makers and listen for train make sure you also have your 4 way flashers on when coast is clear keeping your windows down all noise makers off gradually proceed to go over tracks do not shift over tracks get up to the speed limit and then you can go about your business fines are different in alot of states and if DOT catches you yeah you probably will get your license yanked

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Christopher J.'s Comment
member avatar

Also if you have only a permit you should not be driving with a Hazmat you only get a Hazmat when you apply and send in fingerprints and and pass your final road test not to mention written test at the DMV its a Homeland Security Background check and that would be my evidence since I got a Hazmat cost about $160 I hope your not driving without one and your hauling Jet A fuel you get caught you can kiss your permit goodbye and get a hefty fine and probably lose your chance at getting your license for quite sometime dont mean to be so harsh but tell your company you might save them some money

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DMV:

Department of Motor Vehicles, Bureau of Motor Vehicles

The state agency that handles everything related to your driver's licences, including testing, issuance, transfers, and revocation.

David's Comment
member avatar

I believe any hazmat load, you stop at R/R crossing, toss 4 ways on listen for any sound of train, and then proceed on.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

B. Scott's Comment
member avatar

Also if you have only a permit you should not be driving with a Hazmat you only get a Hazmat when you apply and send in fingerprints and and pass your final road test not to mention written test at the DMV its a Homeland Security Background check and that would be my evidence since I got a Hazmat cost about $160 I hope your not driving without one and your hauling Jet A fuel you get caught you can kiss your permit goodbye and get a hefty fine and probably lose your chance at getting your license for quite sometime dont mean to be so harsh but tell your company you might save them some money

Thank you for the quick response. No, I'm not driving any HAZMAT vehicles personally yet, just a flatbed with air brakes. Like I said, I've heard people say that hazard lights need to be on, but I haven't been able to find anywhere that actually says I have to do it. Doesn't cost me anything to throw the switch, I was just wondering if it was actually required.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DMV:

Department of Motor Vehicles, Bureau of Motor Vehicles

The state agency that handles everything related to your driver's licences, including testing, issuance, transfers, and revocation.

B. Scott's Comment
member avatar

I believe any hazmat load, you stop at R/R crossing, toss 4 ways on listen for any sound of train, and then proceed on.

Thank you for the quick reply David

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

Rick S.'s Comment
member avatar

Hazard lights are to warn traffic behind you, that you are coming to a stop (thereby CREATING a hazard yourself). HM loads and Passenger (bus) both seem to be required to do this.

Wisconsin, Texas and other states I've taken a cursory look at - call for a 60 day suspension for railroad grade violations. Wisconsin mentions something of the order of 3 YEARS if you're carrying HM in a CMV.

Interestingly enough - the "hazard lights requirement", is NOT actually spelled out in FMCSA 392.10, which is the regulation regarding railroad crossings.

So -I honestly couldn't say if the hazard lights are truly a LEGAL REQUIREMENT - none of the states I've look at actually had it IN THE STATUTE (and it isn't spelled out specifically in 392.10.

On the other hand, every bus and placarded vehicle I've seen at a RR X-ing DOES IT (hazards), it was taught to do it at the county CDL school I attended - so I would treat it as GOSPEL ANYWAY (whether or not you can be cited for it).

Here's an interesting booklet from Operation Lifesaver on Highway-Rail Grade Crossing Training for Professional Truck Drivers, that covers CMV Railroad Crossings - which also doesn't mention hazard lights.

Help this helps, though my research and the lack of statutes/regs specifically mentioning hazard lights lead me to believe it's not part of any regulation/law - but I'd advise using them anyway in the case of placarded HM loads and Passenger Buses.

Regards,

Rick

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

CSA:

Compliance, Safety, Accountability (CSA)

The CSA is a Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) initiative to improve large truck and bus safety and ultimately reduce crashes, injuries, and fatalities that are related to commercial motor vehicle

FMCSA:

Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration

The FMCSA was established within the Department of Transportation on January 1, 2000. Their primary mission is to prevent commercial motor vehicle-related fatalities and injuries.

What Does The FMCSA Do?

  • Commercial Drivers' Licenses
  • Data and Analysis
  • Regulatory Compliance and Enforcement
  • Research and Technology
  • Safety Assistance
  • Support and Information Sharing

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

CMV:

Commercial Motor Vehicle

A CMV is a vehicle that is used as part of a business, is involved in interstate commerce, and may fit any of these descriptions:

  • Weighs 10,001 pounds or more
  • Has a gross vehicle weight rating or gross combination weight rating of 10,001 pounds or more
  • Is designed or used to transport 16 or more passengers (including the driver) not for compensation
  • Is designed or used to transport 9 or more passengers (including the driver) for compensation
  • Is transporting hazardous materials in a quantity requiring placards

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
B. Scott's Comment
member avatar

Hazard lights are to warn traffic behind you, that you are coming to a stop (thereby CREATING a hazard yourself). HM loads and Passenger (bus) both seem to be required to do this.

Wisconsin, Texas and other states I've taken a cursory look at - call for a 60 day suspension for railroad grade violations. Wisconsin mentions something of the order of 3 YEARS if you're carrying HM in a CMV.

Interestingly enough - the "hazard lights requirement", is NOT actually spelled out in FMCSA 392.10, which is the regulation regarding railroad crossings.

So -I honestly couldn't say if the hazard lights are truly a LEGAL REQUIREMENT - none of the states I've look at actually had it IN THE STATUTE (and it isn't spelled out specifically in 392.10.

On the other hand, every bus and placarded vehicle I've seen at a RR X-ing DOES IT (hazards), it was taught to do it at the county CDL school I attended - so I would treat it as GOSPEL ANYWAY (whether or not you can be cited for it).

Here's an interesting booklet from Operation Lifesaver on Highway-Rail Grade Crossing Training for Professional Truck Drivers, that covers CMV Railroad Crossings - which also doesn't mention hazard lights.

Help this helps, though my research and the lack of statutes/regs specifically mentioning hazard lights lead me to believe it's not part of any regulation/law - but I'd advise using them anyway in the case of placarded HM loads and Passenger Buses.

Regards,

Rick

Thank you Rick, that was very insightful

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

CSA:

Compliance, Safety, Accountability (CSA)

The CSA is a Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) initiative to improve large truck and bus safety and ultimately reduce crashes, injuries, and fatalities that are related to commercial motor vehicle

FMCSA:

Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration

The FMCSA was established within the Department of Transportation on January 1, 2000. Their primary mission is to prevent commercial motor vehicle-related fatalities and injuries.

What Does The FMCSA Do?

  • Commercial Drivers' Licenses
  • Data and Analysis
  • Regulatory Compliance and Enforcement
  • Research and Technology
  • Safety Assistance
  • Support and Information Sharing

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

CMV:

Commercial Motor Vehicle

A CMV is a vehicle that is used as part of a business, is involved in interstate commerce, and may fit any of these descriptions:

  • Weighs 10,001 pounds or more
  • Has a gross vehicle weight rating or gross combination weight rating of 10,001 pounds or more
  • Is designed or used to transport 16 or more passengers (including the driver) not for compensation
  • Is designed or used to transport 9 or more passengers (including the driver) for compensation
  • Is transporting hazardous materials in a quantity requiring placards

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

I just finished (yesterday) my class with Swift & got my CDL - no hazmat or other endorsement just now. The Swift road instructor told us to do the full routine (4-way, windows, no shifting) at RR crossings all the time. On my Mississippi DMV test I needed to cross the tracks two times, so I did the procedure two times with the DMV inspector on board. At least he did not question what I was doing.

If nothing else, you could file this as "Best Practice".

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DMV:

Department of Motor Vehicles, Bureau of Motor Vehicles

The state agency that handles everything related to your driver's licences, including testing, issuance, transfers, and revocation.

Sandman's Comment
member avatar
double-quotes-start.png

Also if you have only a permit you should not be driving with a Hazmat you only get a Hazmat when you apply and send in fingerprints and and pass your final road test not to mention written test at the DMV its a Homeland Security Background check and that would be my evidence since I got a Hazmat cost about $160 I hope your not driving without one and your hauling Jet A fuel you get caught you can kiss your permit goodbye and get a hefty fine and probably lose your chance at getting your license for quite sometime dont mean to be so harsh but tell your company you might save them some money

double-quotes-end.png

Thank you for the quick response. No, I'm not driving any HAZMAT vehicles personally yet, just a flatbed with air brakes. Like I said, I've heard people say that hazard lights need to be on, but I haven't been able to find anywhere that actually says I have to do it. Doesn't cost me anything to throw the switch, I was just wondering if it was actually required.

In the training program offered by this site. It has all the details for hasmat loads. I would suggest studying it. It will only help give you the right info. Operate as if you are in the strictest state at all times. It will only help you be safer. Other drivers info may be wrong, its not always their intent to be wrong. Information just get twisted. One of my highschool teachers taught us this by telling the first person in the class the homework assignment. When it got to the end it was way off. He didn't warn the class on what he was doing. It started as a 500 word essay on a historical figure of your choice. It ended by being a 600 word essay with historical significants. As being the last one to hear this.....my simple thought was WTF!? Still remember that to this day as how information can get twisted without someones intention to twist it.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DMV:

Department of Motor Vehicles, Bureau of Motor Vehicles

The state agency that handles everything related to your driver's licences, including testing, issuance, transfers, and revocation.

Page 1 of 2 Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

This topic has the following tags:

Getting Your CDL HAZMAT Understanding The Laws
Click on any of the buttons above to view topics with that tag, or you can view a list of all forum tags here.

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More