Problems With My Company Truck

Topic 6941 | Page 1

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Christopher M.'s Comment
member avatar

Okay, I'm a brand new driver, just picked up my first truck and my first load. This is a question for veteran drivers out there.

Just got my company truck a 2013 right out of the gate but clearly the last driver who had it really couldn't drive it well, didn't maintain it well or had the same problems with our break down call center I now am. My engine is making REALLY LOUD NOISES. I called it in and they sent out a dummy who said it could be a pully, could be the ac. He has no idea. No fix to the problem. I also informed the company that there's a bent tandom rim and the tire keeps running low. The mud flaps on the tractor, left is torn right is missing. The trailer one rear marker lamp is out and one front marker lamp is broken and taped together while a 3rd is hanging off. At ideal I loss oil pressure, truck stops and the tack just drops. I checked the oil and its full. The tractor is also due for p m. Can't get to a terminal right now but the company will not allow me to take it any where to handle any of these problems. Need this job and don't want to quit, but also don't need DOT to pull me in for an inspection I know I will fail. Almost happened today in Texas lucky for me they flaged me threw, before they heard my engine noise as I drove out of there! Almost forgot one thing, right fuel tank was dented when I picked up the truck and after I filled it up today I noticed sepage from the fuel cap down the side of the tank! Should I maybe call our safety director since service will not help me out with all this?

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Tim S.'s Comment
member avatar

Okay, I'm a brand new driver, just picked up my first truck and my first load. This is a question for veteran drivers out there.

Just got my company truck a 2013 right out of the gate but clearly the last driver who had it really couldn't drive it well, didn't maintain it well or had the same problems with our break down call center I now am. My engine is making REALLY LOUD NOISES. I called it in and they sent out a dummy who said it could be a pully, could be the ac. He has no idea. No fix to the problem. I also informed the company that there's a bent tandom rim and the tire keeps running low. The mud flaps on the tractor, left is torn right is missing. The trailer one rear marker lamp is out and one front marker lamp is broken and taped together while a 3rd is hanging off. At ideal I loss oil pressure, truck stops and the tack just drops. I checked the oil and its full. The tractor is also due for p m. Can't get to a terminal right now but the company will not allow me to take it any where to handle any of these problems. Need this job and don't want to quit, but also don't need DOT to pull me in for an inspection I know I will fail. Almost happened today in Texas lucky for me they flaged me threw, before they heard my engine noise as I drove out of there! Almost forgot one thing, right fuel tank was dented when I picked up the truck and after I filled it up today I noticed sepage from the fuel cap down the side of the tank! Should I maybe call our safety director since service will not help me out with all this?

Did you not inspect the truck before you took it? I would have never left the terminal without a different truck or that the issues were fixed regardless of what they told me.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Christopher M.'s Comment
member avatar

Problem is I didn't get this truck at the terminal , I was sent out to recover it from a former driver that didn't return it. I took pictures of all the damage you can see and sent in a qual comm message about the other issues. I also called my driver manager and break down. So they haven't seen this truck probably in 6 months but I'm telling them about it and have asked if I can have it looked at but they just want me to keep on rolling!

Okay, I'm a brand new driver, just picked up my first truck and my first load. This is a question for veteran drivers out there.

Just got my company truck a 2013 right out of the gate but clearly the last driver who had it really couldn't drive it well, didn't maintain it well or had the same problems with our break down call center I now am. My engine is making REALLY LOUD NOISES. I called it in and they sent out a dummy who said it could be a pully, could be the ac. He has no idea. No fix to the problem. I also informed the company that there's a bent tandom rim and the tire keeps running low. The mud flaps on the tractor, left is torn right is missing. The trailer one rear marker lamp is out and one front marker lamp is broken and taped together while a 3rd is hanging off. At ideal I loss oil pressure, truck stops and the tack just drops. I checked the oil and its full. The tractor is also due for p m. Can't get to a terminal right now but the company will not allow me to take it any where to handle any of these problems. Need this job and don't want to quit, but also don't need DOT to pull me in for an inspection I know I will fail. Almost happened today in Texas lucky for me they flaged me threw, before they heard my engine noise as I drove out of there! Almost forgot one thing, right fuel tank was dented when I picked up the truck and after I filled it up today I noticed sepage from the fuel cap down the side of the tank! Should I maybe call our safety director since service will not help me out with all this?

double-quotes-end.png

Did you not inspect the truck before you took it? I would have never left the terminal without a different truck or that the issues were fixed regardless of what they told me.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Driver Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Bart's Comment
member avatar

PARK IT NOW!!!! There is no way you should be driving that thing. Call safety ASAP. If you can't get thru to safety call the night DM. But whatever you do don't take it on the road for your same and that of the motoring public.

If your company won't help you, you are better off without them. There are plenty of jobs for safe drivers out there. Do not get your driving career off to this kind of start.

Can I ask who you are driving for?

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Tim S.'s Comment
member avatar

If that was me I would pull over and tell them you aren't driving another mile until it gets serviced and legal. If you have a contract (and don't quote me on this because I am not a driver yet and I could be telling you something stupid) you could tell them if it's not fixed or they don't supply you with another truck that you will breach the contract and go drive for someone else. Keep a record of all your communications you have with them and if leaving for another company is what it takes for you to be a safe driver let them take you to court for breach of contract and use all the communications you've had with them regarding it just in case you need it for evidence to prove that you were doing what you are supposed to and not driving a non-legal and unsafe tractor.

AJ D.'s Comment
member avatar

I would be interested in the name of this company, also...

btw... park the truck and get another. It's just going to leave you stranded at some point and it always seems to happen on a cold, rainy night...

MRC's Comment
member avatar

What ever you do, Do Not Leave The Truck! if you leave the truck somewhere other than at a terminal or somewhere told to you By the company YOU will be labeled as abandoning the vehicle and won't be working for anyone. If you are told by the company to deliver it somewhere make sure you have someone (not the janitor) at the destination give you a signed receipt for the delivery of the truck, trailer any cargo and keys. And also the current condition of vehicle (keep hold of those pics and any proof of contact with co.) once you leave it someone could trash it more and you would have no proof it wasn't you. Cover your ass!!!!!!!! Sounds extreme but think of how many ways this can come back on you.....good-luck.gif

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Christopher M.'s Comment
member avatar

Thanks for all the advise, you know it would be a great truck for a new driver if they fix the problems with it. When its fixed I'll treat it as if I own it and baby it. But I agree it shouldn't be out on the road as is so I'm going to deliver this load and before I send my empty call I'm going to send a message to route me directly to the nearest terminal. Fix it or keep it. They know that I left my last company for the same reason and I will leave them just as fast. As far as the company name I do work for them for now and this could become an issue so I will not disclose their name at this time. But thanks drivers. You have been very helpful, now I know I'm not asking to much of this company.embarrassed.gif

What ever you do, Do Not Leave The Truck! if you leave the truck somewhere other than at a terminal or somewhere told to you By the company YOU will be labeled as abandoning the vehicle and won't be working for anyone. If you are told by the company to deliver it somewhere make sure you have someone (not the janitor) at the destination give you a signed receipt for the delivery of the truck, trailer any cargo and keys. And also the current condition of vehicle (keep hold of those pics and any proof of contact with co.) once you leave it someone could trash it more and you would have no proof it wasn't you. Cover your ass!!!!!!!! Sounds extreme but think of how many ways this can come back on you.....good-luck.gif

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Terry C.'s Comment
member avatar

I think I'd be pulling into the next open scale and parking the truck, go inside and ask a dot inspector if you voluntarily have the truck checked if you would get a ticket for the out of service problems the truck has. That way dot can put the truck out of service and force the company to deal with it. You don't want to be working for a company like that anyway.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

PanamaExpat's Comment
member avatar

I think I'd be pulling into the next open scale and parking the truck, go inside and ask a dot inspector if you voluntarily have the truck checked if you would get a ticket for the out of service problems the truck has. That way dot can put the truck out of service and force the company to deal with it. You don't want to be working for a company like that anyway.

Let's play devil's advocate. As a person that has had many employees over the years I am seeing a pattern it the OP's postings. He says he left his last company over the truck having safety issues. We're on with a new company and now this truck has safety issues. From an employer's viewpoint I am starting to see a whiner. As an employer if there is one thing I can't stand it is a whiner. I'll admit that if the truck were picked up as a recovery as the owner of the truck it should have been run through the shop for a checkout and repair of any problems found.

As for your truck having no oil pressure at idle... If it were a serious issue you would already have connecting rods sticking out through the side of engine block. A little icy patch on your windscreen... So what? It's freakin' winter time. If the company tell you to keep running... you are already on thin ice from my perspective. Keep running and tell them it needs to be shopped for maintenance and have the mechanics look at your issues while you are in terminal.

As an employer if you abandon my property I'll straight up see you never drive for anyone ever again. If you voluntarily pull into a DOT facility and have the truck tagged as out of service I hope you have money in your pocket in order to find your way home. Also plan on never working in the industry again.

Sadly reading many of these posts by greenhorn drivers I see a lot of you that need to realize... Living on the road ain't a bowl of cherries.... STOP WHINING. SUCK IT UP AND DO THE JOB YOU WERE HIRED FOR!

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
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