Rider Program

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Brett Aquila's Comment
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It is hard to believe since alot of their freight is heavy, so I would think that they would stick with the 13 speed trannys and Cat motors

It's all about efficiency. Those transmissions are more expensive and you can be sure they're switching to Cummins to save money on both the cost of the motor and fuel efficiency.

Not to mention, they hire students right out of school so 9 and 10 speed transmissions are easier to drive than 13 speeds.

Back in the day the 13 speed with the Cat was a big deal. It probably helped recruit drivers. But nowadays nobody really cares too much, especially students because they're new to the industry. Cat engines used to be the most powerful, Pete's were the only cool trucks on the road, and everyone loved to brag about grabbing gears in a 13 speed. But in the end you have to make money. Bragging rights don't pay the bills.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
BuckeyeCowboy's Comment
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Yeah. Their website says that they have both. I've never driven a stick before so 9, 10, or 13 I say bring it on cause I am ready for it. I like Peterbilts a lot and the ones TMC have are beautiful but Melton also has the Kenwoth T660 which is my second favorite truck. So, as long as Im not tossed into a Volvo I will be good with what they give me. Jk about the Volvos.

BuckeyeCowboy's Comment
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More good news just keeps coming. Yesterday I got pre-hires from Warner and Boyd Brothers. Today from Roehl, and some more should be coming in the next few days. So, now I guess I need to figure out if I want to drive vans, refers, or skateboards. LOL. So, many choices and yet so many great companies.

Pre-hire:

What Exactly Is A Pre-Hire Letter?

Pre-hire letters are acceptance letters from trucking companies to students, or even potential students, to verify placement. The trucking companies are saying in writing that the student, or potential student, appears to meet the company's minimum hiring requirements and is welcome to attend their orientation at the company’s expense once he or she graduates from truck driving school and has their CDL in hand.

We have an excellent article that will help you Understand The Pre-Hire Process.

A Pre-Hire Letter Is Not A Guarantee Of Employment

The people that receive a pre-hire letter are people who meet the company's minimum hiring requirements, but it is not an employment contract. It is an invitation to orientation, and the orientation itself is a prerequisite to employment.

During the orientation you will get a physical, drug screen, and background check done. These and other qualifications must be met before someone in orientation is officially hired.

Pre-hires:

What Exactly Is A Pre-Hire Letter?

Pre-hire letters are acceptance letters from trucking companies to students, or even potential students, to verify placement. The trucking companies are saying in writing that the student, or potential student, appears to meet the company's minimum hiring requirements and is welcome to attend their orientation at the company’s expense once he or she graduates from truck driving school and has their CDL in hand.

We have an excellent article that will help you Understand The Pre-Hire Process.

A Pre-Hire Letter Is Not A Guarantee Of Employment

The people that receive a pre-hire letter are people who meet the company's minimum hiring requirements, but it is not an employment contract. It is an invitation to orientation, and the orientation itself is a prerequisite to employment.

During the orientation you will get a physical, drug screen, and background check done. These and other qualifications must be met before someone in orientation is officially hired.

Brett Aquila's Comment
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That's awesome!

If you haven't read through em yet, we have a series of articles on how to choose a company to work for, including an 8-part series that I wrote which covers the differences between dry van , reefer , flatbed, tanker, small companies, big companies, etc. You can find em here:

How To Choose A Trucking Company

You'll have to scroll down a bit to get to the series I wrote, but all of the articles in that section will give you a good understanding of the different choices you have.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

BuckeyeCowboy's Comment
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I will check them out. Thanks Brett. I did want to ask, I am kinda at an impass in comparing companies. Each companies website is different and some dont have a lot of info on what they offer, yet others do. I used your section: Companies that hire recently grads, and that only had a few of the companies I am looking at. Do you have any other reccomendations where I can go? I am not necessairly looking for people's opinions on companies yet, just the facts of what they off. Thanks.

Daniel B.'s Comment
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I don't get it... When I graduated I took my wife with me after my first month solo. No problem. Just signed the paperwork and I was good to go.

BuckeyeCowboy's Comment
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Daniel, thanks for the information, I am wanting to take her before the 30 days though. Example, get out of training, most companies will send you homebound to get stuff for your truck and see the family. I want to bring her on with me then. So, I think with most companies there is just the liability factor, they want to make sure you can drive first.

weezy's Comment
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Cat stopping making motors for other companies. They are in the research and development area for designing a dump truck line and there is talk of them coming out with their own semi tractor. Just what I heard around the camp fire. That is why the Pete's at TMC are rolling cummins engines.

Brett Aquila's Comment
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I am kinda at an impass in comparing companies. Each companies website is different and some don't have a lot of info on what they offer, yet others do. I used your section: Companies that hire recently grads, and that only had a few of the companies I am looking at. Do you have any other recommendations where I can go?

Well if they're not listed in our Trucking Companies section or our Company-Sponsored Training section then the two best options are to look at their website or start calling the companies and speaking with the recruiters.

What's nice about speaking with the recruiters is that you'll hear the best selling points of each company. Obviously it's the recruiter's job to sell you on their company. So right away they'll be able to tell you not only the ordinary things like mileage pay, raises, benefits, equipment, divisions, etc but they'll also give you the best reasons to come work for them.

Often times a trucking company will have little features that don't get talked about much or that most people wouldn't even think of. For instance, Crete Carriers will give you the option of up to three loads to choose from when you're empty (at least they used to). That is almost unheard of and it's a really amazing perk.

Another example is Roehl Transport. They have some really amazing home time options I don't think I've seen anywhere else:

7-On/7-Off Fleet

Exclusively from Roehl , our 7-On/7-Off Fleet drivers drive seven days and then they are home for seven days at a time. If you choose a 7-On/7-Off Fleet, you’ll have 26 weeks a year off. You must be fully rested prior to dispatch. Space in the 7-On/7-Off Fleets may be limited in some areas of the country.

7/4-7/3 Fleet

Getting more miles is a key feature of our 7/4-7/3 Fleets. When you join a 7/4-7/3 Fleet, you’ll drive seven days, then be home four days, then you’ll drive seven days followed by three days of home time. That’s an average of 120 days off and mileage goals between 95,000 and 105,000 per year. You must be fully rested prior to dispatch, and space in the 7/4–7/3 Fleets may be limited in some areas of the country.

14/7 Fleet

Roehl's 14/7 Fleets are unique options that combine the mileage goals of a 7/4-7/3 Fleet (between 95,000 and 105,000 per year) with the extended home time of a 7/7 Fleet. You’ll drive fourteen days and then be home seven days. Space in our 14/7 Fleets is available in limited areas, and you must be fully rested prior to dispatch.

I'm not trying to sell you on those companies. But it shows that different companies have some unique selling points and the recruiters are the ones that will spell them out for you right away.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Company-sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

guyjax(Guy Hodges)'s Comment
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It helps they have beautiful black and chrome petterbilts with a cat.

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I do not know how true this is, but a TMC driver came to my school on Saturday morning and told me that TMC is going to start going with 9 speed trannys and cummings motors Petes. It is hard to believe since alot of their freight is heavy, so I would think that they would stick with the 13 speed trannys and Cat motors.

Caterpillar no longer makes Class 8 over the road engines for big trucks. Could not pass emissions. TMC can haul over sized and wide loads but that does not make them over weight. Generally speaking most flatbed companies stay under the 80,000 lbs limit for the interstate so a 9 speed transmission will not be a problem. Companies do it everyday. Cummings, Detroit, or Paccar, or Volvo....does not matter. 500 horsepower is still 500 horsepower no matter the engine.

Want to know the difference between Caterpillar and all the other engines on the market? The name. You are paying for a name brand product that made a name for itself year ago.

Over The Road:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

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