Landing A Job In Trucking Coming Off Disability

Topic 7035 | Page 1

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AntoineF's Comment
member avatar

Hi I'm on Disability with a Ticket to Work from Social Security to return to work (the ticket to work program allows you stay on disability until you can obtain permanent work) I have worked ticket to work jobs for the past 10 years on and off they were temporary jobs with temp job agencies. However in Sept of 2014 I got a part time job at Enterprise Car Rentals at Columbus Ga. I have obtained a CDL MEDICAL Certificate on the 23 of Dec 2014 and my CDL Permit and intend to take the HazMat , Doubles and Tankers test on the 30 of Jan 2015 also get the fingerprinting and Passport Card on 12 Feb 2015 also. Just waiting to let the recruiter at Swift know when I'll be ready to leave? She said that was all she needed is that true? or do I have to still go threw the history check after I get to school? I have worked as a non CDL truck driver of a 45 ft bob tail lift-gate truck for Ferguson Plumbing in Sanford, NC and Defense Reutilization & Marketing Office Defense Reutilization & Marketing Office at Fort Bragg as heavy equipment operator also through a Temp Agency. Does once being Disabled prevent you from being hire-able with Swift or other Trucking Companies? I'm just not sure of the exact dates? Have a copy of motor vehicle report which shows I held a Class A CDL in NC in 1995?

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

MRC's Comment
member avatar

Hey Antoine, Wow sorry no one has responded to you on this subject or just to say hi!! The ticket to work should have all of your work on file in case there are any questions by whomever (swift?) Having them on your resume will document that you have been working towards employment. The fact that they (THE GOV. ) say that you are ok to join this profession plus the fact that you have a med card means that you are employable. You should have no problems, just make sure you have no voids in your work history that aren't explained. Hope this helps, Good Luck

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

Yeah, if you can pass the physical and the government says you can go back to work then it sounds like you're eligible for work in the industry, but it may not be easy to find. The concerns companies will have is obvious....you've hardly worked in years. The problem is that trucking is one of the most difficult jobs out there. The days are super long and life on the road is gruelling, especially when you're new. Without a proven track record of holding down full time jobs in recent years a lot of companies are going to be very reluctant to hire you. Many have specific policies stating they will not hire someone who has been unemployed for a certain amount of time over the past year. So they're definitely concerned about that sort of thing.

But it sounds like you're ready to get on with Swift's Company-Sponsored Training Program and that would be awesome. If they'll accept you into the program knowing your history and everything you've told them checks out then you're in!

But that's only the beginning.

That entire training process will be more like a tryout to make the team. They're going to watch you closely, as they do every student, to see if they think you're going to go on to become a safe, productive driver for the company. So everyone has to earn their spot. Work hard, learn all you can, and have a great attitude.

Probably 80% of the drivers that start on day one won't wind up being with the company long at all. Heck, half of the students probably won't make it to the end of the training. Some will fail the physical, some the drug test, and others will be deemed "Not likely to pan out" you could say and be sent home without a job. So if you want to make it through, go in there expecting one heck of a tough challenge and show em what you can do.

Company-sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

AntoineF's Comment
member avatar

Hey Antoine, Wow sorry no one has responded to you on this subject or just to say hi!! The ticket to work should have all of your work on file in case there are any questions by whomever (swift?) Having them on your resume will document that you have been working towards employment. The fact that they (THE GOV. ) say that you are ok to join this profession plus the fact that you have a med card means that you are employable. You should have no problems, just make sure you have no voids in your work history that aren't explained. Hope this helps, Good Luck

Thank You very Much I am very encouraged by your post and your great encouragements I thank you for myself and my family for your kindness and wish for you all the blessing that GOD has! Again Thank You

AntoineF's Comment
member avatar

Hey Antoine, Wow sorry no one has responded to you on this subject or just to say hi!! The ticket to work should have all of your work on file in case there are any questions by whomever (swift?) Having them on your resume will document that you have been working towards employment. The fact that they (THE GOV. ) say that you are ok to join this profession plus the fact that you have a med card means that you are employable. You should have no problems, just make sure you have no voids in your work history that aren't explained. Hope this helps, Good Luck

Thank You very Much I am very encouraged by your post and your great encouragements I thank you for myself and my family for your kindness and wish for you all the blessing that GOD has! Again Thank You

AntoineF's Comment
member avatar

Yeah, if you can pass the physical and the government says you can go back to work then it sounds like you're eligible for work in the industry, but it may not be easy to find. The concerns companies will have is obvious....you've hardly worked in years. The problem is that trucking is one of the most difficult jobs out there. The days are super long and life on the road is gruelling, especially when you're new. Without a proven track record of holding down full time jobs in recent years a lot of companies are going to be very reluctant to hire you. Many have specific policies stating they will not hire someone who has been unemployed for a certain amount of time over the past year. So they're definitely concerned about that sort of thing.

But it sounds like you're ready to get on with Swift's Company-Sponsored Training Program and that would be awesome. If they'll accept you into the program knowing your history and everything you've told them checks out then you're in!

But that's only the beginning.

That entire training process will be more like a tryout to make the team. They're going to watch you closely, as they do every student, to see if they think you're going to go on to become a safe, productive driver for the company. So everyone has to earn their spot. Work hard, learn all you can, and have a great attitude.

Probably 80% of the drivers that start on day one won't wind up being with the company long at all. Heck, half of the students probably won't make it to the end of the training. Some will fail the physical, some the drug test, and others will be deemed "Not likely to pan out" you could say and be sent home without a job. So if you want to make it through, go in there expecting one heck of a tough challenge and show em what you can do.

Thank You very much!!!!! I intend to take your advice to heart and to give 110% to the effort of being the best student possible and to listen,question and retain as much of the information as possible!!@ Working for so many Temp Agency has giving me skills operating rubber tire front end loaders, Loading heavy equipment on dovetail,goose-neck trailers and other lowboy type of trailers along with securement of loads of all types of construction and military equipment,delivering bathroom tubs and shower stalls,along with chemicals and and in the 80 and 90's driving a 13 speed road-ranger from Fayetteville,NC to Winnipeg,Canada twice a week(for 26 cents a mile back then) seems that hasn't changed? in my 55 years on earth i have driven flatbeds,vans hauling all the above along with Gas pipe,steel you name it. I believe I am physically fit and mentally capable to meet and conqueror the challenges that are ahead, just need a chance to succeed. My main concern is to operate safely not harming any person or destroying any property or the environment!!!!!! With your and others good will and the blessing of GOD I hope to make my family and all of you proud of me and to contribute to society and be a example to my grand children on the ability of a person who is willing to work hard,be honest and never give up to succeed !!!! Thank you and may GOD bless and keep you.

Company-sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

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