Nervous Rookie Driver

Topic 7037 | Page 1

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CT Trucker 's Comment
member avatar

Good Evening Everyone,

My name is Chris I am new to the site, just wanted to share a little about myself and why I am so nervous. I have my class B license for almost 4 years and decided I need a change in my life so decided to go get my class A so I join a local driving school which all my instructors have been great and patent with me the whole time. The pre-trip,straight back and parallel parking I am very confident in, now alley dock has been my worse enemy lol but not giving up at all I do alot of studying and watching other students do the maneuver hoping eventually it just clicks. Also have to work on my double clutching.

I am about 3 weeks from graduation and already have a job with Schneider National pending passing my test,felt having a job lined up before finishing would be a great motivation but now as I get closer and closer I am more nervous then ever I want this bad and failing isn't a option for me ( very hard on my self if you can tell ) What I am the most nervous about is the OTR going to stops with messed up docks and wondering if i can put this truck in the hole not like I can go back to the hub at the end of the day and ask for a co-workers opinion, I know Schneider does extensive training but that is my biggest fear being new in the Tractor Trailer field.

I am here to network with other truckers and learn as much as possible from each and everyone of you, I value everyone's helps and cant wait to speak with my new pals in the trucker field. Thanks for listening

Chris

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Double Clutch:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

Double Clutching:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

David's Comment
member avatar

Good Evening Everyone,

My name is Chris I am new to the site, just wanted to share a little about myself and why I am so nervous. I have my class B license for almost 4 years and decided I need a change in my life so decided to go get my class A so I join a local driving school which all my instructors have been great and patent with me the whole time. The pre-trip,straight back and parallel parking I am very confident in, now alley dock has been my worse enemy lol but not giving up at all I do alot of studying and watching other students do the maneuver hoping eventually it just clicks. Also have to work on my double clutching.

I am about 3 weeks from graduation and already have a job with Schneider National pending passing my test,felt having a job lined up before finishing would be a great motivation but now as I get closer and closer I am more nervous then ever I want this bad and failing isn't a option for me ( very hard on my self if you can tell ) What I am the most nervous about is the OTR going to stops with messed up docks and wondering if i can put this truck in the hole not like I can go back to the hub at the end of the day and ask for a co-workers opinion, I know Schneider does extensive training but that is my biggest fear being new in the Tractor Trailer field.

I am here to network with other truckers and learn as much as possible from each and everyone of you, I value everyone's helps and cant wait to speak with my new pals in the trucker field. Thanks for listening

Chris

Chris, welcome to the site.

Every rookie driver and experienced driver feels the same as you are. Backing is an art, it takes a bit to get it down. 2years in and I still struggle with backing. The biggest thing is to always make sure your safe and not hit anything.

take a look at you tube and watch some videos there.

What part of the back up is making it tough for you? remember to always Get Out And Look (G.O.A.L)

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Double Clutch:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

Double Clutching:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

Rolling Thunder's Comment
member avatar

Hey Chris and welcome.

Like David said, every on of us have had those feelings and doubts. It will get easier as you go. The school gives you the basics, the real learning will come with Schneider. Don`t stress over any of the backing and shifting, or any other issue you may be having. Keep cool and always remember: Do not hit anything.

You will do fine.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
CT Trucker 's Comment
member avatar

Thanks guys for the support, just over thinking way to much I guess. I need to focus on getting this license few weeks oh school left.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

Yeah, the guys are right......everyone feels that way when they first get started in trucking. And we never sugarcoat it.....those first few months are going to be some of the toughest you'll ever face. But they'll also be some of the most exciting and rewarding.

The key is to remain calm at all times, focus on safety always, and simply don't hit anything. Sounds obvious, I know. But you'll see when you get out there that you'll be spending a lot of time backing up while others are watching and waiting. You'll be clogging up the parking lots, the streets, and everywhere in between trying to get backed in and people are gonna be waiting...impatiently. I'd say 90% of the problems rookies run into involve getting backed in somewhere. They get nervous, they get in a hurry, and back into something.

That kind of thing is common. Keep your cool, take it one moment at a time, and just focus on safety. Every tough situation is only temporary. Soon enough the tough situation will be behind you and it'll make for a great story to tell someday.

And don't forget to have fun with this too ya know! Learning to drive a big rig is one of the coolest things you can do. Enjoy yourself all you can. Having fun can really help a person keep their sanity.

smile.gif

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
CT Trucker 's Comment
member avatar

Thanks brett, your right I am just going to take my time, if it takes me 20 min to get the truck in the hole safe then so be it, your right rushing leads to accidents,better safe then sorry. I actually just bought a book today "The Tractor Trailer Book" by Jimmy Cox really good book so far if I can take something from this book it payed for its self i feel.

I am excited to start up my career with Schneider Nation I pick them cause of there training program, cant wait to join the rest of you fellas on the road and learning the ropes. Thanks again

Chris

Joe H.'s Comment
member avatar

Good Evening Everyone,

I am about 3 weeks from graduation and already have a job with Schneider National pending passing my test,felt having a job lined up before finishing would be a great motivation but now as I get closer and closer I am more nervous then ever I want this bad and failing isn't a option for me ( very hard on my self if you can tell ) What I am the most nervous about is the OTR going to stops with messed up docks and wondering if i can put this truck in the hole not like I can go back to the hub at the end of the day and ask for a co-workers opinion, I know Schneider does extensive training but that is my biggest fear being new in the Tractor Trailer field.

I am here to network with other truckers and learn as much as possible from each and everyone of you, I value everyone's helps and cant wait to speak with my new pals in the trucker field. Thanks for listening

Chris

I've been driving for just a few months and for me the testing out was the most stressful because you're only allowed a limited number of pull ups and G.O.A.L.s. But it gets easier once you're out and about. Don't be shy, either. Ask for help if you think you need it.

When I'm backing I try to remember these three things my range instructor drilled into my head.

1. Take your time

2. Don't let other people drive your truck (in other words, don't be influenced by other drivers waiting for you to get out of their way, inpatient 4-wheelers or those crazy yard dogs. This also applies for when your DM sends you to a shipper to pick up a load that doesn't exist or was picked up the day before by another driver)

3. It doesn't have to be pretty...just get it in there.

Good luck!

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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