I Feel Like I Am Getting Gipped

Topic 8561 | Page 1

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Tom P.'s Comment
member avatar

Well I have been driving for about 4 months or so and I have been running new jersey new York east pa MD n Delaware. I figured I would of seen a few states but I haven't. I am making good money well gross after swift takes theirs n the tax man I am getting garbage but anyway. I feel like I am learning more then most about driving but not seeing any of the sights I live 60 miles from the DC I run out of pottsville pa so all these places I been to before in my car tons of times. How long should I keep doing this because its like a normal job at this point.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

Tom, are you in a regional division that gets you home on weekends by chance? Or a dedicated account of some sort? Also, what kind of miles are you getting each week?

Rarely would a company keep you in such a small area unless you were in a specific division of some sort that called for it.

If you really want to see the entire country you'll want to get on with a refrigerated company. Most of them will send you out west for sure.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Tom P.'s Comment
member avatar

Tom, are you in a regional division that gets you home on weekends by chance? Or a dedicated account of some sort? Also, what kind of miles are you getting each week?

Rarely would a company keep you in such a small area unless you were in a specific division of some sort that called for it.

If you really want to see the entire country you'll want to get on with a refrigerated company. Most of them will send you out west for sure.

I'm on swifts Walmart account dedicated. I run like 2000 a week but they are tough miles. Its good pay 44 a mile stop pay load pay whole nine yards but I really feel like I should be seeing more of the country

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Snappy's Comment
member avatar
double-quotes-start.png

Tom, are you in a regional division that gets you home on weekends by chance? Or a dedicated account of some sort? Also, what kind of miles are you getting each week?

Rarely would a company keep you in such a small area unless you were in a specific division of some sort that called for it.

If you really want to see the entire country you'll want to get on with a refrigerated company. Most of them will send you out west for sure.

double-quotes-end.png

I'm on swifts Walmart account dedicated. I run like 2000 a week but they are tough miles. Its good pay 44 a mile stop pay load pay whole nine yards but I really feel like I should be seeing more of the country

Yep, this is why. I was offered a dedicated position at my first company and turned it down for the same reasons you mentioned -- I want to see both oceans, all 48, and Canada. :) Dedicated is great for consistent miles, pay, and hometime. But I got into this for a little bit of adventure. Sounds like you did too.

Have you tried talking to your DM about OTR opportunities? Usually the dedicated slots fill up fastest, if you make it clear that you want OTR and they do that, you should have no problem getting it.

Just be sure you know what you're asking for -- I haven't seen my house since early April. I have no plans to return until early June. This is by choice, but you'll be out at least three weeks at a time with most companies. The pay is a little less consistent, as well. Just something to think about...

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Tom P.'s Comment
member avatar
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Tom, are you in a regional division that gets you home on weekends by chance? Or a dedicated account of some sort? Also, what kind of miles are you getting each week?

Rarely would a company keep you in such a small area unless you were in a specific division of some sort that called for it.

If you really want to see the entire country you'll want to get on with a refrigerated company. Most of them will send you out west for sure.

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

I'm on swifts Walmart account dedicated. I run like 2000 a week but they are tough miles. Its good pay 44 a mile stop pay load pay whole nine yards but I really feel like I should be seeing more of the country

double-quotes-end.png

Yep, this is why. I was offered a dedicated position at my first company and turned it down for the same reasons you mentioned -- I want to see both oceans, all 48, and Canada. :) Dedicated is great for consistent miles, pay, and hometime. But I got into this for a little bit of adventure. Sounds like you did too.

Have you tried talking to your DM about OTR opportunities? Usually the dedicated slots fill up fastest, if you make it clear that you want OTR and they do that, you should have no problem getting it.

Just be sure you know what you're asking for -- I haven't seen my house since early April. I have no plans to return until early June. This is by choice, but you'll be out at least three weeks at a time with most companies. The pay is a little less consistent, as well. Just something to think about...

I have been asking for trips just like a week or so let me go see stuff but they say no. Like I don't wanna be otr full time I know the money sucks at least with swift I would like to get out some

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
RedGator's Comment
member avatar

Tom I know with your company you will not see .44cpm otr. My advice stick out the rest of your 1st year them you can move off that account, go OTR , see the country and still make money. Ill tell ya nobody wants to run that NE Region thats why thet have told ya no. Im also impressed that is the hardest region to run in and your doing it as a rookie!

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Attila's Comment
member avatar

Tom, ask your DM specifically if you are in regional or the lower 48. They accidentally placed me in regional without any notification and I was stuck doing CA, OR, NV runs. Asked them what was going on and someone messed up in safety by placing me there. Once you go lower 48 you will be all over the place. They will expect you to run around 3 weeks at a time before going home FYI.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Attila's Comment
member avatar

Ah, you're dedicated, they prolly wont budge on that :-( ,,who knows though.

Steve L.'s Comment
member avatar

Tom it sounds like you want some OTR , but not necessarily permanent. I agree with what the others said, but you may also want to set yourself a goal; say, complete your first year and then ask for OTR with your company and give that a year (don't tell them you only intend to do it for a year). Most companies aren't likely to bounce you from one to the other for short terms. Then after a year or so of OTR (if you find yourself wanting to go back to regional) put in for it.

Whatever you decide, hang in there and keep doing a good job. That goes a long way to helping you get what you want and not just what the company wants.

Good luck.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

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