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Phil C.'s Comment
member avatar

Not me but just something I found on facebook. Driver turned around in a tight spot and dragged a big boulder for a mile or so. The video link you might need to copy and paste. https://video-lax1-1.xx.fbcdn.net/hvideo-xft1/v/t42.1790-2/11387504_10205154761243547_1467574718_n.mp4?efg=eyJybHIiOjUxNiwicmxhIjo1MTJ9&rl=516&vabr=287&oh=79b35c59a5552395c3d1bb9514f09635&oe=55A0470C11427219_10205154765043642_296430777870111109530_10205154768403726_667508246095810373510_10205154773723859_467107989437010177253_10205154781364050_636403603409711425201_10205154812524829_88358068691721544940_10205154815884913_20951452636819

Phil

Chris the stick slinger's Comment
member avatar

Look how far forward those tandums are. Can you say tail whip?

Funny and sad.

.02

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Shantanic (Shannon F.)'s Comment
member avatar

Not the type of rock and roll I like.

JJ's Comment
member avatar

Not the type of rock and roll I like.

rofl-3.gif

The Persian Conversion's Comment
member avatar

I wonder if that officer cited him for an unsecured load...

Pat M.'s Comment
member avatar

Look how far forward those tandums are. Can you say tail whip?

Funny and sad.

.02

The tail of the trailer is not going to whip like you think with the tandems that far forward. What you have to be aware of is the side of the trailer that is away from the direction you are turning. The tail swing on that side can get you. I believe that this is what happened to this driver. The tandems were close to that rock and the tail just swung right over it because of the tight turn.

All of you posting are starting to sound like posters on other forums. This can happen to anyone.

The thing that I would criticise the driver about is not looking in his mirrors. How can you not see the marks on the road behind you, especially when cornering? More frequent checks in your mirrors will stop you before you get that far down the road.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

It's hard to hear/feel things that happen at the back end of your trailer. Remember the time your tandems climbed a curb, or worse, scraped a sign at the corner? You may have seen it in the mirror, but the shake & sound never made it to year ears & butt. (And yes, not watching in your mirror does'nt mean it didn't happen!)

As Pat described, the driver probably scooped the rock, and never knew it. And, as usual, it an be really funny, especially when it's not you!

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Chris the stick slinger's Comment
member avatar
double-quotes-start.png

Look how far forward those tandums are. Can you say tail whip?

Funny and sad.

.02

double-quotes-end.png

The tail of the trailer is not going to whip like you think with the tandems that far forward. What you have to be aware of is the side of the trailer that is away from the direction you are turning. The tail swing on that side can get you. I believe that this is what happened to this driver. The tandems were close to that rock and the tail just swung right over it because of the tight turn.

I do believe you explained tail whip to a tee. Which is all I said.

All of you posting are starting to sound like posters on other forums. This can happen to anyone.

What exactly are you trying to say here? I gave an observation is all. I know it can happen to anyone because it has already happened to me. Tandums all the way forward and all. Hence the funny/sad comment as that's what those pics made me feel. It was funny cause I had it happen to me and sad cause that driver has to go through it too.

If you take my post as anything other than opinions, observations, and a witty (in my opinion) joke here and there my apologies.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Chrisoriginally said,

Look how far forward those tandums are. Can you say tail whip?

Funny and sad.

.02

Then replied to Pat:

If you take my post as anything other than opinions, observations, and a witty (in my opinion) joke here and there my apologies.

Chris, chill. This isn't the Congressional Record! Yes, I bet it was funny to the people watching the rolling rock. And I bet the driver was able to laugh, after he got over his embarrassment.

But Pat has a point: rookie drivers (yeah, I'm still one!) need to understand how the trailer moves in different situations.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Gator's Comment
member avatar

There is a video from the dash cam of one of the cops....the driver was swerving back and forth trying to get that bolder out...and he dragged it a good long ways...

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