Mcelroy Vs Maverick Pay

Topic 9379 | Page 1

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Tyler M.'s Comment
member avatar

I am pre hired with mcelroy but talked to a recruiter at maverick willing to send me to orientation. Who has the best pay? I want to do flatbed. I'm 21 and just got my cdl. Not worried about the work that comes along with flatbed. Just need some advice. Thanks

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Pre Hire:

What Exactly Is A Pre-Hire Letter?

Pre-hire letters are acceptance letters from trucking companies to students, or even potential students, to verify placement. The trucking companies are saying in writing that the student, or potential student, appears to meet the company's minimum hiring requirements and is welcome to attend their orientation at the company’s expense once he or she graduates from truck driving school and has their CDL in hand.

We have an excellent article that will help you Understand The Pre-Hire Process.

A Pre-Hire Letter Is Not A Guarantee Of Employment

The people that receive a pre-hire letter are people who meet the company's minimum hiring requirements, but it is not an employment contract. It is an invitation to orientation, and the orientation itself is a prerequisite to employment.

During the orientation you will get a physical, drug screen, and background check done. These and other qualifications must be met before someone in orientation is officially hired.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Tyler, you are brand new at this, and I understand where you are coming from wanting to make sure you are going to be getting lots of miles and making the best pay you can, but you are probably a little nervous about those things because of what you've read online or heard other students talking about.

Here's the deal on how it works in the real world of driving trucks. Any and all of the fairly large carriers, and I would include both McElroy, and Maverick in that group, hove got tons of freight, which means they can give you all the miles that you can handle. The key to your success lies in your approach to the job. I emboldened that last statement because I'm hoping you will see the importance in it. I drove the first sixteen months of my career for Western Express, a company that has had nothing but slanderous lies and ridiculous accusations railed against it on the internet. I loved it over there, made some really good money, and received accolades and rewards for being a "top performer." I would probably still be over there, had I not received a very generous offer from Knight Transportation to participate in a new dedicated flat-bed program they were getting into. You simply cannot measure your success in "cents per mile" or average miles weekly. I never wanted to know how many miles do the other guys average. Here is what I looked for in my job: I wanted to make sure that I was one of the guys who was up at the top keeping those averages as high as they could be. Because let me warn you there are a lot of slackers in this business who do nothing but complain that they are not getting their share of the miles.

Here's an example my dispatcher shared with me last week. He told me he had a couple of drivers who were complaining about not getting enough miles. He asked me if I wouldn't mind running a few trips into some different areas than I am usually assigned, while he let them try running some of the loads that I usually handle up into the North East areas like Connecticut, New Jersey, and New York. I told him it made no difference to me, I might enjoy a change in scenery and I knew I could still get just as many miles because I'm gonna hustle on each load and get it in there early enough so that I can move on to the next load. Just a few days later he dispatches me to Connecticut, so I inquire "what happened to running me in some other parts of the country?" Well, he said "those two guys were more specifically complaining that they heard some rumors that you were doing 3,200+ miles a week, and they thought they were getting cheated, but when I tried to send them to New Jersey, and New York, they started saying Oh No, we're not going up there." You see, they were exactly right about the kind of miles I run, but when the reality of how I do that stuff was presented to them they didn't want any part of it!

Tyler, find a company that you seem to think will fit with your personality and go with it. Realize that for at least a year you are going to be in a huge learning curve - seriously it will take almost that long to get to where you will have enough understanding about the job so that you can out perform the other drivers. Performance - your performance, is what it is all about. The folks who prove themselves and make stuff happen out here on the road are the ones who get the most miles and make the best money. You will never be satisfied if you are continually looking for the best paying company, or the company that you think treats their drivers the best. The best drivers are treated the best - that's a simple truth that most people never understand. Jump in there and do your best, and you will soon discover that what I'm telling you is the "Trucking Truth."

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Tyler M.'s Comment
member avatar

Thanks sir. I think I'm going with mcelroy. I know that you won't know how a job is til you get in it. This is my first year. Im definetly looking forward to it. Thanks for the advice. Greatly appreciate it sir

Eggman's Comment
member avatar

Tyler, you are brand new at this, and I understand where you are coming from wanting to make sure you are going to be getting lots of miles and making the best pay you can, but you are probably a little nervous about those things because of what you've read online or heard other students talking about.

Here's the deal on how it works in the real world of driving trucks. Any and all of the fairly large carriers, and I would include both McElroy, and Maverick in that group, hove got tons of freight, which means they can give you all the miles that you can handle. The key to your success lies in your approach to the job. I emboldened that last statement because I'm hoping you will see the importance in it. I drove the first sixteen months of my career for Western Express, a company that has had nothing but slanderous lies and ridiculous accusations railed against it on the internet. I loved it over there, made some really good money, and received accolades and rewards for being a "top performer." I would probably still be over there, had I not received a very generous offer from Knight Transportation to participate in a new dedicated flat-bed program they were getting into. You simply cannot measure your success in "cents per mile" or average miles weekly. I never wanted to know how many miles do the other guys average. Here is what I looked for in my job: I wanted to make sure that I was one of the guys who was up at the top keeping those averages as high as they could be. Because let me warn you there are a lot of slackers in this business who do nothing but complain that they are not getting their share of the miles.

Here's an example my dispatcher shared with me last week. He told me he had a couple of drivers who were complaining about not getting enough miles. He asked me if I wouldn't mind running a few trips into some different areas than I am usually assigned, while he let them try running some of the loads that I usually handle up into the North East areas like Connecticut, New Jersey, and New York. I told him it made no difference to me, I might enjoy a change in scenery and I knew I could still get just as many miles because I'm gonna hustle on each load and get it in there early enough so that I can move on to the next load. Just a few days later he dispatches me to Connecticut, so I inquire "what happened to running me in some other parts of the country?" Well, he said "those two guys were more specifically complaining that they heard some rumors that you were doing 3,200+ miles a week, and they thought they were getting cheated, but when I tried to send them to New Jersey, and New York, they started saying Oh No, we're not going up there." You see, they were exactly right about the kind of miles I run, but when the reality of how I do that stuff was presented to them they didn't want any part of it!

Tyler, find a company that you seem to think will fit with your personality and go with it. Realize that for at least a year you are going to be in a huge learning curve - seriously it will take almost that long to get to where you will have enough understanding about the job so that you can out perform the other drivers. Performance - your performance, is what it is all about. The folks who prove themselves and make stuff happen out here on the road are the ones who get the most miles and make the best money. You will never be satisfied if you are continually looking for the best paying company, or the company that you think treats their drivers the best. The best drivers are treated the best - that's a simple truth that most people never understand. Jump in there and do your best, and you will soon discover that what I'm telling you is the "Trucking Truth."

This comment tho! Even tho I’m not the OP- I will be taking this comment to heart and carry it with me.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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