Finishing School On Thursday

Topic 9448 | Page 1

Page 1 of 2 Next Page Go To Page:
Stone Cold Cone Killer's Comment
member avatar

As I understand it, wrapping up school = I will be sent to Atlanta to begin an orientation. I am concerned. I have still never spoken with anyone from the company up to this point and I am not exactly thrilled by the prospect of being forced to team drive with another student for my first year on the road. Did choosing to attend school lock me into a debt of thousands of dollars?

Is a year of safe driving a bare minimum before I can consider looking for a company that would allow me to drive solo?

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Jessica A-M's Comment
member avatar

Choosing to attend school gave you the foundation you needed to build on for success as a trucker and you would have had the debt whether you went to a private school or to a company sponsored school. As far as teaming for a year, that's company specific. I'm not sure what company you will be starting with but, many of them only require teaming during training and that's generally less than a year.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

It sounds like maybe you went with CRST?

Is a year of safe driving a bare minimum before I can consider looking for a company that would allow me to drive solo?

No, quite honestly it is not. You could go to school where you're at, work there for a few months or whatever, and land a job elsewhere. But I highly recommend staying with the company and working off the contract if at all possible. Here's why....

Say you go to school for the company, work there two months, and quit for another job. For starters, you'll have to pay back the tuition at a much higher rate than you would have if you had worked it off. So any raise you might be getting to jump ship will probably be lost in tuition. So you've gained nothing in that regard.

But the worst case scenario that worries me is one that's altogether too common I'm afraid. Say you get to your new company and three weeks later you get in a little fender bender. Many companies will fire a driver who has an incident in their first few months. If that were to happen, imagine what your job resume now looks like. You have less than three months of OTR experience which in itself is almost of no value. But you also left your first company right away without fulfilling the contract you signed and then promptly got in a wreck and got fired from your second job.

Now you're hoping that a strong, reputable company with good pay and great equipment will take a chance on you? The heck with that! Leaving your first job right away tells them you'll probably jump ship the first chance you get even if you don't wreck their truck right away like you did with the second company.

No thanks!

I think jumping around and trying to gain some sort of advantage early on in your career is a mistake. I think you're taking a lot of risk and in the end you're probably not going to do yourself any good.

Now let me say this for the sake of full disclosure. We do have people in this forum that did in fact jump ship once or twice right away and put themselves into a better job with better pay and home time. It has worked out well for them. So it's not that it can't be done, but it's certainly taking quite a risk early on in your career. Those jobs would have been available anyway to those drivers had they stayed where they were at and finished out that first year.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

Stone Cold Cone Killer's Comment
member avatar

You are correct about the company I picked being Csrt. I am currently training and really wish this guy wanted miles as badly as I do. I lay here having just finished my 11 hours @ 12.5¢ per mile and have to wonder what all the hype was about. I like driving and take safety seriously, always have. I guess I am just too motivated because I am new to the game. The game plan is to keep my mouth shut and pretend I am satisfied with this situation until I have enough experience to leverage more miles and/or more cpm. I don't have a place other than the truck and have lived the nomad lifestyle too long to be hindered by it.

In conclusion, assuming I complete my contract in good standing, is there any path I should gear for? I am in this for the long haul and originally had my sights on becoming an O/O. After reading several threads here.....I get the feeling that's a huge gamble.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Scott O.'s Comment
member avatar

Crst pays split miles not split pay.. you should be making .25cpm... as for teaming with a new student you don't have to. you can find someone with experience but that is harder... I'm going to need a co driver in two weeks... hit me up if you need a co driver still... I've been with Crst for 5 months Now...

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Stone Cold Cone Killer's Comment
member avatar

Crst pays split miles not split pay.. you should be making .25cpm... as for teaming with a new student you don't have to. you can find someone with experience but that is harder... I'm going to need a co driver in two weeks... hit me up if you need a co driver still... I've been with Crst for 5 months Now...

Crst splitting pay is the same as splitting miles. I ran a load, 611 miles and total earning for that day was $76.37. I am 7 weeks in and am on day 13 sitting at the terminal waiting on a load. 28 days of training = 17 days with miles and 11 without. I am sure it will get better.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
I am 7 weeks in and am on day 13 sitting at the terminal waiting on a load. 28 days of training = 17 days with miles and 11 without. I am sure it will get better.

What??? Why in the world have you gone 11 days without a load out of 28? There isn't a trucking company in America that can survive on those numbers so I know that's not the case with most of their trucks. What can you tell us about what's going on that can give us more insight into this? Because nobody should be sitting that much. If you've been broken down a couple times for a few days each time I can understand. That happens. But it can't just be a matter of slow freight.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Stone Cold Cone Killer's Comment
member avatar

Training: Day 1-3, sat in trainer's truck waiting for a load. Day 4, get load from Florida to Texas. Day 6-8, wait for load. Day 9, get load from Tx to Az and another " city run " ( 32 miles ). Day 10 - 12, wait for load. ( Overhear trainer express concern about lack of miles with what I assume is the load manager. Day 13, get load to Tx. Days 14/15, wait for load.

Day 16, get load to NJ. Arrive at shipper , must wait 2 days for shipping to be open. Approx day 19, get load to CA, and instructions to stop while in CA for pm service. Arrive 4 hours early for pm service to find 6am appt was a farce. 2 days later, pm service is complete but no sleep at terminal. Have to run load to Ut.

Timing gets blurry for me here. Next load goes to Tx. Learn the road from Ut to Tx that runs through Co is scary.... Arrive in Tx and wait 2 days for load to Ks. Deadhead to Me for load, relay to terminal in Okc & wait 5 days...training complete. Assigned new truck and solol load, arrive at shipper to learn load was taken hours early by different shipper.

Now the learning curve.... Instructed to drive 30+ miles to drop empty, then wait 8 more days for next load. The empty move resets layover pay...where the story goes from here, I don't know yet. Total miles thus far, approx 5,750. Must be more frugal, money is getting low. Message on Qualcomm says freight is currently slow.

Deadhead:

To drive with an empty trailer. After delivering your load you will deadhead to a shipper to pick up your next load.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.
Stone Cold Cone Killer's Comment
member avatar

Timing gets blurry for me here. Next load goes to Tx. Learn the road from Ut to Tx that runs through Co is scary.... Arrive in Tx and wait 2 days for load to Ks. Deadhead to Ne for load, relay to terminal in Okc and wait 5 days...training complete. Assigned new truck and solol load, arrive at shipper to learn load was taken hours early by different shipper.

Now the learning curve.... Instructed to drive 30+ miles to drop empty, then wait 8 more days for next load. The empty move resets layover pay...where the story goes from here, I don't know yet. Total miles thus far, approx 5,750. Must be more frugal, money is getting low.

Deadhead:

To drive with an empty trailer. After delivering your load you will deadhead to a shipper to pick up your next load.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Stephanie D.'s Comment
member avatar

Is it common for rookie drivers to go out to team drive with other rookies? Is that generally company specific? That seems kind of backwards to me. I understand it's a learning experience but how are you supposed to learn from someone as green as you?

Page 1 of 2 Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

This topic has the following tags:

CRST Van Expedited Choosing A Trucking Company Company Sponsored CDL Training Company Trainers Team Driving
Click on any of the buttons above to view topics with that tag, or you can view a list of all forum tags here.

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More