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Looking to go with Roehl or TMC - Couple of questions about the hiring process.

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Mathiasinthe573's Comment
member avatar

Crunch time and decisions to make.

I got my CLP on Wednesday - I already had a USDOT Med Card and I used the High Road materials to study. So - check that off the list.

TMC passed on me based on the driving record for now.

Maverick - Approved and on the waitlist for orientation. I initially chose Regional Flatbed, but because their focus is Temp Controlled - I offered to go that route if it gets me to orientation sooner and my foot in the door. Nothing says I can't switch fleets later on down the road. Maverick definitely pays the best for rookie drivers. The orientation being one big interview still makes me nervous to leave a job for no guarantee. But high risk, high reward. Should know by the 16th if I get to go orientation at the end of January.

Roehl - Interview went well and was invited to start the hiring process. They offered me Midwest Regional right away. Though I'm concerned if they'll honor that or still have me running further and longer, but just at a lower CPM. Submitted my medical questionnaire and received a call back to schedule physical and drug test. The nearest facility is 60 miles and is out of the forms. So - there will be a delay in getting it scheduled.

Witte Bros - Interview went well and was invited to their training. They're waiving their $500 admin fee for January, but I think I'm pushing it out to February to give myself time to see where things go with Maverick, but they're a viable option. They're a regional compan that runs a lot of LTL. So there's a lot of stops and unloading. The rate is a little lower than most at .26 CPM at 0-3 mos, .28 at 3-6 mos, and .31 at 6. But they also have progressive stop pay that adds up. $12.50/1st stop, $22.50/2nd stop, $32.50/3rd stop and each stop after. Recruiter (grain of salt required) says the average rookie makes the equivalent of .45 - .49 CPM and they're averaging 23-2700 miles. Trucks are 15-17 Petes and Freightliners with Fridge and Microwave provided - which would keep some expense down.

Down to these three. Now I have to decide, commit, and don't look back.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

BMI:

Body mass index (BMI)

BMI is a formula that uses weight and height to estimate body fat. For most people, BMI provides a reasonable estimate of body fat. The BMI's biggest weakness is that it doesn't consider individual factors such as bone or muscle mass. BMI may:

  • Underestimate body fat for older adults or other people with low muscle mass
  • Overestimate body fat for people who are very muscular and physically fit

It's quite common, especially for men, to fall into the "overweight" category if you happen to be stronger than average. If you're pretty strong but in good shape then pay no attention.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

CLP:

Commercial Learner's Permit

Before getting their CDL, commercial drivers will receive their commercial learner's permit (CLP) upon passing the written portion of the CDL exam. They will not have to retake the written exam to get their CDL.

Dan E.'s Comment
member avatar

I keep seeing a theme of TMC passing on people. What's up with that?

Crunch time and decisions to make.

I got my CLP on Wednesday - I already had a USDOT Med Card and I used the High Road materials to study. So - check that off the list.

TMC passed on me based on the driving record for now.

Maverick - Approved and on the waitlist for orientation. I initially chose Regional Flatbed, but because their focus is Temp Controlled - I offered to go that route if it gets me to orientation sooner and my foot in the door. Nothing says I can't switch fleets later on down the road. Maverick definitely pays the best for rookie drivers. The orientation being one big interview still makes me nervous to leave a job for no guarantee. But high risk, high reward. Should know by the 16th if I get to go orientation at the end of January.

Roehl - Interview went well and was invited to start the hiring process. They offered me Midwest Regional right away. Though I'm concerned if they'll honor that or still have me running further and longer, but just at a lower CPM. Submitted my medical questionnaire and received a call back to schedule physical and drug test. The nearest facility is 60 miles and is out of the forms. So - there will be a delay in getting it scheduled.

Witte Bros - Interview went well and was invited to their training. They're waiving their $500 admin fee for January, but I think I'm pushing it out to February to give myself time to see where things go with Maverick, but they're a viable option. They're a regional compan that runs a lot of LTL. So there's a lot of stops and unloading. The rate is a little lower than most at .26 CPM at 0-3 mos, .28 at 3-6 mos, and .31 at 6. But they also have progressive stop pay that adds up. $12.50/1st stop, $22.50/2nd stop, $32.50/3rd stop and each stop after. Recruiter (grain of salt required) says the average rookie makes the equivalent of .45 - .49 CPM and they're averaging 23-2700 miles. Trucks are 15-17 Petes and Freightliners with Fridge and Microwave provided - which would keep some expense down.

Down to these three. Now I have to decide, commit, and don't look back.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

BMI:

Body mass index (BMI)

BMI is a formula that uses weight and height to estimate body fat. For most people, BMI provides a reasonable estimate of body fat. The BMI's biggest weakness is that it doesn't consider individual factors such as bone or muscle mass. BMI may:

  • Underestimate body fat for older adults or other people with low muscle mass
  • Overestimate body fat for people who are very muscular and physically fit

It's quite common, especially for men, to fall into the "overweight" category if you happen to be stronger than average. If you're pretty strong but in good shape then pay no attention.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

CLP:

Commercial Learner's Permit

Before getting their CDL, commercial drivers will receive their commercial learner's permit (CLP) upon passing the written portion of the CDL exam. They will not have to retake the written exam to get their CDL.

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Mathias says:

... and don't look back.

That's the best idea posted here in quite a while.

No second guessing yourself, no "buyer's remorse". You've checked all the grasses, you don't expect any other will be much greener than in your current yard.

Look forward where you're going and pick your destination now, instead of wondering what might have been.

dancing-banana.gifdancing-banana.gifdancing-banana.gifdancing-banana.gifdancing-banana.gif

Mathiasinthe573's Comment
member avatar

From everyone I've talked to and everything I've read it boils down to the fact that they're a paid CDL Program, with great training, great pay, great equipment, good hometime, and are committed to safety and professionalism. So - they've got a business to run and if they've got tons of applicants and they're looking for maximum return on investment, they can be selective.

I've got no hard feelings. I know my driving record isn't perfect and I'm committed to continuing to keep it clean and being a safe, responsible driver.

Down the road, if I need a change and I've got my CDL, experience, and established a pattern of safety - I can always try again.

If I didn't need training or had loads of experience, maybe they would have taken me because there's less money out of their pocket to lose. Who knows. Can't dwell or be bitter for things I did to get me there. I respect their decision.

I keep seeing a theme of TMC passing on people. What's up with that?

double-quotes-start.png

Crunch time and decisions to make.

I got my CLP on Wednesday - I already had a USDOT Med Card and I used the High Road materials to study. So - check that off the list.

TMC passed on me based on the driving record for now.

Maverick - Approved and on the waitlist for orientation. I initially chose Regional Flatbed, but because their focus is Temp Controlled - I offered to go that route if it gets me to orientation sooner and my foot in the door. Nothing says I can't switch fleets later on down the road. Maverick definitely pays the best for rookie drivers. The orientation being one big interview still makes me nervous to leave a job for no guarantee. But high risk, high reward. Should know by the 16th if I get to go orientation at the end of January.

Roehl - Interview went well and was invited to start the hiring process. They offered me Midwest Regional right away. Though I'm concerned if they'll honor that or still have me running further and longer, but just at a lower CPM. Submitted my medical questionnaire and received a call back to schedule physical and drug test. The nearest facility is 60 miles and is out of the forms. So - there will be a delay in getting it scheduled.

Witte Bros - Interview went well and was invited to their training. They're waiving their $500 admin fee for January, but I think I'm pushing it out to February to give myself time to see where things go with Maverick, but they're a viable option. They're a regional compan that runs a lot of LTL. So there's a lot of stops and unloading. The rate is a little lower than most at .26 CPM at 0-3 mos, .28 at 3-6 mos, and .31 at 6. But they also have progressive stop pay that adds up. $12.50/1st stop, $22.50/2nd stop, $32.50/3rd stop and each stop after. Recruiter (grain of salt required) says the average rookie makes the equivalent of .45 - .49 CPM and they're averaging 23-2700 miles. Trucks are 15-17 Petes and Freightliners with Fridge and Microwave provided - which would keep some expense down.

Down to these three. Now I have to decide, commit, and don't look back.

double-quotes-end.png

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

BMI:

Body mass index (BMI)

BMI is a formula that uses weight and height to estimate body fat. For most people, BMI provides a reasonable estimate of body fat. The BMI's biggest weakness is that it doesn't consider individual factors such as bone or muscle mass. BMI may:

  • Underestimate body fat for older adults or other people with low muscle mass
  • Overestimate body fat for people who are very muscular and physically fit

It's quite common, especially for men, to fall into the "overweight" category if you happen to be stronger than average. If you're pretty strong but in good shape then pay no attention.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

CLP:

Commercial Learner's Permit

Before getting their CDL, commercial drivers will receive their commercial learner's permit (CLP) upon passing the written portion of the CDL exam. They will not have to retake the written exam to get their CDL.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
I keep seeing a theme of TMC passing on people. What's up with that?

All of the Company-Sponsored Training Programs have different criteria people have to meet. Some companies will have more lenient requirements than others.

You have to keep in mind that these companies are making a huge financial commitment to the students they're bringing in and they're going to be taking a huge risk putting them behind the wheel as brand new drivers. So they try to narrow down their selections as best they can to the people they think have the best chance of making it through and going on to become safe, productive drivers.

Some companies will bring in almost anyone with a warm body and a reasonable background and decide once everyone arrives who they're going to keep and who they'll send home. Other companies try to be more selective up front and only bring in the drivers they think have a better chance at success.

Company-sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

Lissa's Comment
member avatar

Larval Roehl flatbedder here (just under 1 month driving. Was very pleased with Roehl's CDL school in Marshfield. The flatbed training...Not so much, but you get a lot more of that out with your trainer. I've found other flatbed drivers hugely helpful, regardless of company. TMC drivers are a classy bunch, always helpful.

Had a longer wait for a trainer then to get in to school. Expected that, as a female flatbedder.

Roehl has a lot of Midwest flatbed stuff going on. I'm National, but probably spend 70% of my time in the Midwest. Can't speak to hometime yet.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Mathiasinthe573's Comment
member avatar

Update:

It will be at least another month until Maverick could get me into their driving school, so I am planning to start training with Witte Bros on Monday. It's the longest program out of all the ones I considered at 8-12 weeks (4-6 weeks on site in Troy, MO learning the basic skill set, then 4-6 weeks with a trainer OTR). The loose timeframe was unnerving at first, but after talking to a couple of drivers I like that it's not a one size fits all format and it's geared towards the individual. I'm not going to be stuck if I adapt quickly or rushed if it takes me a few tries. The drivers I've talked to, new and old, seem to love the company and the equipment. Plus - they're very close to home at 90 miles (soon to be 45 when the wife & kid move to St. Louis in a couple months).

So - a few more days until my journey begins.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

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