Does anyone here run Walmart dedicated out of Moberly Missouri?

Topic 20939 | Page 1

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Chris M's Comment
member avatar

Well after I deliver my current load tonight I'll be heading over to Moberly to "help out" for a few days. I've never ran Walmart dedicated and I know there are topics on here discussing them that I'll read while I'm being unloaded in a little while.

I was just curious if there is anyone on here that runs out of that particular DC. All I know is that I'll be pulling reefer loads, 300-500 miles per day round trip, and 2-4 stops per load.

I'm looking forward to seeing how it goes because I know I've read and heard from other drivers that it's a pretty high pace. I'm definitely up for a challenge so I guess I'll find out what I'm made of lol.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Chris I just saw this and have just enough time to briefly respond. It doesn't matter what Wally Grocery DC you are running store loads out of, they all follow the same basic process. I have run out of four different DCs, and have found the only difference is geography and the varying accents of the DMs and planners. With that said, I can help you with this...at least I'll try.

Gladhand, Tractorman, Miss Miyoshi, Kat, Pianoman, and TerminalRat (aka JJ) have all run Walmart at one time or another. I've been doing it exclusively for 5 years now. Search on their names and Walmart and you'll see the progression of the learning curve, etc.

Here is everything I have written on the subject: Walmart Dedicated. Most of the photos in my profile are of Walmart equipment...take a look and you'll see the interior of the reefer; bulkheads, controls, blowers, so you know what to expect.

First rule of thumb, the paperwork. You will receive your paperwork (with a set of seals corresponding with the number of stops), when you are dispatched containing the following; trip plan (has all of your stops and instructions), scale sheet (signature required), seal card (signature required), load map and individual store invoices. Request that someone who knows what they are doing, either a DM , planner or an experienced hand, walk you through the paperwork and review the load map; in particular when running a reefer load. The seal card, gets you out of the DC (guard shack) and back in and must be presented when leaving and turned-in when returning. I highly recommend NOT striking out on your own before getting help with this paperwork. USE the directions on the trip-plan explicitly!!! I in many cases it’s the only route ensuring safe passage to the docks. Do not rely on the QC (NaviGo) it will always route you to the front of the store. Please trust me on this, the trip plan (first page) is your route Bible! Many stores have two dock areas; one for Grocery “GRC” (you) and General Merchandise “GM” (not you). The trip plan directions will direct you how-to get to the correct dock, and in some cases which door to use.

Since you are running reefer; Wally reefers are designed for running consolidated store loads in (up to) 3 different temperature zones. The zones are separated by movable bulkheads that must be raised and secured overhead in order to access beyond zone 3 (the tail) and re-secured at each stop up until the last one. Usually zone 1 & 3 are above zero (like dairy or fresh produce), and zone 2 is sub-zero usually set at -20’f (like ice cream, frozen veggies). Keep in mind, you are overseeing the unloading process at every store. I have only dropped a reefer box at a store once. Store pallets are all mixed together (the load map will spell this out, why I called it out in pervious paragraph) and identified with at least one 5x7 inventory tag with the store number printed on it and two pull-tabs; one of which you need to remove and adhere to the back of the load map. That said, many times pallets designated for different stores will be intermixed in a specific zone; all frozen is usually in zone 2. This may require removal of several pallets to access the pallet you are delivering at a specific stop. Anything taken off not designated for the store stop you are currently at, must go back on and in the correct zone. Most of the Walmart grocery unloaders know this and if you inform this is your first time, they are likely to help you out. Just pay attention and make sure that everything designated for a particular store comes off, again constantly checking the load map. There is a set of controls on the inside of the reefer; rear drivers side. You many times will be asked to shut down a zone, especially zone 2 while they are unloading. The controls are not difficult to understand. You'll have to shut down when empty. The first time you run a backhaul, you will likely need to reset the temps in all 3 zones to a constant number. Ask for help on this the first time if you are not sure. You need to re-seal after each store delivery, in sequential order and leave the correct invoice behind that matches the store being delivered to. Be careful after the first couple of stops, zone two gets mighty slippery.

So yes, the biggest difference between OTR and Walmart, you are constantly interacting with store personnel and are involved with and supervising the unloading process, but not doing the work. Second, your goal every trip is to make it back to the DC before you lose hours. You'll notice your 14 hour clock will encroach and eventually be less-than your drive clock .Expect 30-45 minutes per store. Third, scale every load when leaving the DC because there can be a huge weight variance between the nose and he tail, you never know. The scale should be on the right as you are approaching the guard shack. You will also be expected to top-off your reefer fuel before leaving the DC. Make sure they show you where to do this and the process. Usualy there is an attendant at the fueling pad, ask for help if you are not sure. I am hoping they indoctrinate you with a dry load to get you familiar with the process before throwing you into the pond head-first …but sounds like that’s not the case. Let me know if you have questions (sure I left something out), I may not be able to respond until later tonight. Good luck.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Bulkhead:

A strong wall-like structure placed at the front of a flatbed trailer (or on the rear of the tractor) used to protect the driver against shifting cargo during a front-end collision. May also refer to any separator within a dry or liquid trailer (also called a baffle for liquid trailers) used to partition the load.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Chris, I did exactly what you're getting into, at the Moberly DC. I drove for them for two weeks, then went home. I loved the operation. The "terminal" in the truck service building is the HQ. Complete with a small driver lounge, and two showers.

The DC is right behind a Walmart and a small shopping center. You can put-put over there for shopping, restaurants and even a regular laundromat.

You won't get training on the reefer operation. They'll tell you to call if there's a problem. Also, and G-Town has mentioned this before, your route will use up your 14 hours of you slack any.

Finally, Dairy Deli Frozen loads get a priority. Call the store when you arrive, tell them you have DDF and back in to the Grocery dock. You'll need to check off the pallets as the store staff unloads them.

Enjoy!

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Chris M's Comment
member avatar

I really appreciate the replies guys. Very detailed breakdown G-town and that answered alot of my questions. The biggest things I didn't know about were the operation at the DC as far as paperwork and dispatching, and the operation at the stores concerning unloading.

I'm not afraid to ask questions so I'll definitely be getting clarity from them when I get there about anything I can think of. I would like to ask you guys a couple more questions.

1) With dispatching, am I sent load information on the qc and then have to accept the load, as I would a regular OTR load, and then get paperwork and seals from security, or do I check-in with the Swift staff on-site in the morning to get all of the load information?

2) Going along with the above, I'm assuming that this is a straight up 24 hour operation, so am I rolling as soon as my 10 hr break is complete, and into the stores ASAP, or are the drops at each store on appointment times?

3) Am I dispatched with fueling locations as a normal OTR load, or do they have a fuel island on-site for the Swift trucks?

I've delivered to a few Walmart DC's that were Swift dedicated, but never really checked the operation out lol. I've always just gotten in and out as quick as possible. Thanks for the help guys!

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

Gladhand's Comment
member avatar

1) they send all the info on the Qualcomm and you have to accept it. You will go into the office and they will give you the paperwork and seals.

2) Usually you will end up being in the sleeper for 12 hrs or so. I was at Los Lunas. The drops at the stores are in a window. Not sure if it's the same at all the others but at the operation I was at dry must by delivered by 2000, dairy and frozen by midnight, and meat/produce by 0600. Basically you want to drop as fast as possible and get back to the dc.

3) Always fill the reefer on site, but you will be sent to different fueling locations just like otr.

Make sure someone shows you how to operate the bulkheads. I had to learn the hard way haha. It's all about hustling, the more you can run the better. Burn up your clock do a 34 and do it all over again. Good luck!

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Bulkhead:

A strong wall-like structure placed at the front of a flatbed trailer (or on the rear of the tractor) used to protect the driver against shifting cargo during a front-end collision. May also refer to any separator within a dry or liquid trailer (also called a baffle for liquid trailers) used to partition the load.

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Chris M's Comment
member avatar

Make sure someone shows you how to operate the bulkheads. I had to learn the hard way haha. It's all about hustling, the more you can run the better. Burn up your clock do a 34 and do it all over again. Good luck!

Thanks for the info! Thankfully I like to run that way anyway lol. I'm usually running out of my 70 and having to take a 34, rather than try to run on recaps.

The bulkheads is definitely something I'll get someone to show me about. I pulled reefer for 9 months when I first started so I'm comfortable with monitoring temps and keeping an eye on the reefer unit itself but never pulled anything with multi temp zones. I don't expect to be doing this for long but it'll be nice to get a little change of pace and see how it works

Bulkhead:

A strong wall-like structure placed at the front of a flatbed trailer (or on the rear of the tractor) used to protect the driver against shifting cargo during a front-end collision. May also refer to any separator within a dry or liquid trailer (also called a baffle for liquid trailers) used to partition the load.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Hey Chris...

They are a 24x7 operation. Every WM load has a dockout time. The planner will try to match that time to the best available PTA. Setting an accurate PTA is really important. You may sit for a bit or you may run as soon as your 10 is up. They will preplan and it will usually hit your QC a couple of hours ahead of your PTA. I rarely accept loads unless it's the second one or it's something special. Ask the DM how they handle preplans.

You retrieve paperwork and seals from your DM at the Swift office in a single packet. The loads are pre-sealed at the D.C., the seals are for resealing after each delivery, there is one extra. The trailer is always locked, loaded and also empty. Remember these trailers are all roll up. Keep em sealed. Although there are appointment times at the stores, the window is huge and almost never an issue.

Fueling varies for us, sometimes we use the fuel at the DC, the local Swift terminal or a Loves or TA. It's usually included in the dispatch on the QC.

Don't start your clock until after you have your paperwork. Preserve that 14! When retrieving your trailer keep your speed under 15 and you'll stay off the driveline. If you have trouble finding your trailer, flag a spotter, they know where they all are, just give them the number you are looking for. Loads are in a drop area adjacent the dock doors. Dispatched loads are almost never on a door. If by chance your trailer is on a door, even if green lighted don't move it. Call the office, let them know and flag a spotter.

Use Google Maps to view your stores. It will help you "see" the dock area and reduce surprises ahead of time. Like Errol said, reefer loads have priority. Although I do ring the bell, if no one answers in 30 seconds, call the store. All the numbers are listed for the stores on the trip sheet.

If I think of anything else I'll post later.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Chris, Goto my profile and view my photos. There are several clear photos of the bulkheads and pulley system. If you are reasonably mechanically inclined, you'll figure it out.

Bulkhead:

A strong wall-like structure placed at the front of a flatbed trailer (or on the rear of the tractor) used to protect the driver against shifting cargo during a front-end collision. May also refer to any separator within a dry or liquid trailer (also called a baffle for liquid trailers) used to partition the load.

Chris M's Comment
member avatar

Chris, Goto my profile and view my photos. There are several clear photos of the bulkheads and pulley system. If you are reasonably mechanically inclined, you'll figure it out.

I just did that and they don't look terribly complicated. I'm parked at the DC now so I guess mid morning tomorrow I'll be getting started lol. Hopefully one of these other drivers will be around to show me how the temp panel inside the trailer works.

I think with the things you guys have said I should be able to manage. It seems like everything works more similarly to OTR than I might have thought for whatever reason. I'm a guy that tries to minimize stops and stay out of the truck stops. It's pretty routine for me to stop for fuel and a 30 minute break and nothing else on full drive days. So as long as I don't slow anyone down while they're unloading me hopefully everything will go smoothly!

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Bulkhead:

A strong wall-like structure placed at the front of a flatbed trailer (or on the rear of the tractor) used to protect the driver against shifting cargo during a front-end collision. May also refer to any separator within a dry or liquid trailer (also called a baffle for liquid trailers) used to partition the load.

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Chris, the Moberly operation you'll probably be in works in two shifts. Mine went something like this: around 1pm the dispatch gets on the QC - 2-3 stops. Go to an area near the entry gate and pick up your pre-loaded trailer, and off you go.

Do your deliveries, fuel where directed (2 years ago, this part's a bit fuzzy, but you don't fuel at the DC.), drop the trailer in the right place at the DC, bobtail back to the office area and shut down. The pace isn't all that bad.

Bobtail:

"Bobtailing" means you are driving a tractor without a trailer attached.

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