I Did An Oops

Topic 21422 | Page 2

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icecold24k's Comment
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I guess I just read his post wrong. I thought he said he was able to take a minute off the pre and post trip to not violate his clock by one minute. If he did however edit it down to only logging one minute for this then yes I agree that is not such a good thing.

Eric L.'s Comment
member avatar

Were you still driving when you ran out of the 14?

Old School's Comment
member avatar
Were you still driving when you ran out of the 14?

Eric, there is a lot of misunderstanding about the fourteen hour clock. The only way you'd get a violation on the fourteen hour clock is to be driving. Many people get confused by that rule and think a professional truck driver is not allowed to work more than fourteen hours in a day.

That fourteen hour clock is really just a "window of opportunity" in which you need to get all your driving done. If you plan on driving for ten hours during your work day then you've got fourteen hours from the time you first put yourself "on duty" to get all that driving done. You might decide to take a leisurely two hour lunch that day, but during that time your fourteen hour clock doesn't stop. Maybe you spend another hour and a half trying to rework a pallet of canned goods in your dry van that crashed to the floor. Your fourteen hour clock is still running.

You have to plan your day so you get your driving goals accomplished before that fourteen hour clock runs out. If you needed to keep working on that badly stacked pallet after your fourteen hour clock runs out it's not a violation, just a long day, but perfectly legal.

Check out this link:

Learn The Logbook Rules (HOS)

We've got some great resources to help your with these confusing rules.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Logbook:

A written or electronic record of a driver's duty status which must be maintained at all times. The driver records the amount of time spent driving, on-duty not driving, in the sleeper berth, or off duty. The enforcement of the Hours Of Service Rules (HOS) are based upon the entries put in a driver's logbook.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Sgt. Diddly's Comment
member avatar

It wasn’t the 14. It was the 70. Probably not smart but I panicked and made a bad decision on the change. Lessons learned.

Were you still driving when you ran out of the 14?

Sgt. Diddly's Comment
member avatar

Wasn’t trying to make excuses at all. Just wanted to give a picture of what happened. But I see how it came off that way.

Now I’ve created a new, much more serious issue that I didn’t even think of when I edited. Guess when you find yourself in a hole, it’s best to just put down the shovel.

If you haven’t already, send in a message or phone call, to whomever you report to, acknowledging your violation. Let them know that you know that you screwed up; and own it. Don’t blame it on any other drivers or circumstances. Just promise to trip plan better and that you won’t do it again. And then don’t do it again. You shouldn’t run any of your clocks down to the last minute; you need to allow yourself time for unforeseen circumstances.

Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

Every time you edit the logs, it now states "edited" on the printed portion that logs and DOT can see. To remove on duty time to allow more drive time is a falsification of records violation.

would be better to explain the one minute violatiion during snow than why you lied on your logs.

as far as my company goes, you get 1 point for violation. If you get 20 violations in six months, you get counseling, at 21 your FM gets reprimanded. The points are removed o a six month rolling basis. So points in January will be off by July. This has nothing to do with any DOT tickets that are possible if you get inspected

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Sgt. Diddly's Comment
member avatar

Thanks. I don’t know why I didn’t think about it. Something in my head just went “ oh, I can fix this”. And I did it without even considering the legitimacy. Talk about a boneheaded move. 😒

Every time you edit the logs, it now states "edited" on the printed portion that logs and DOT can see. To remove on duty time to allow more drive time is a falsification of records violation.

would be better to explain the one minute violatiion during snow than why you lied on your logs.

as far as my company goes, you get 1 point for violation. If you get 20 violations in six months, you get counseling, at 21 your FM gets reprimanded. The points are removed o a six month rolling basis. So points in January will be off by July. This has nothing to do with any DOT tickets that are possible if you get inspected

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
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