I Did An Oops

Topic 21422 | Page 1

Page 1 of 2 Next Page Go To Page:
Sgt. Diddly's Comment
member avatar

Sooo I went over my 70 by one minute tonight. Some genius was confused by the way ez pass tolls work and clogged up the lane coming off Ohio I80 onto I75. Combines with the heavy snow, I didn’t make it to my designated rest area on time. I would have stopped at an exit ramp for my ten just so I didn’t go into HOS violation but with the weather, I wasn’t going to chance other drivers not seeing me or losing control.

Any one else have a minor issue like this? What happened?

Only been driving for six months and with my company for a month so I’m a bit nervous?

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
icecold24k's Comment
member avatar

Ohh yes this will happen from time to time. Things come up and the company is generally understand. You only violated by one minute so I don’t see you getting too much grief over it. It’s obviously not a flagrant violation. I am speaking from a bit of experience here. At my company you’re allowed so many violations before you get counseling. I know this because I am ashamed to admit but I received several log violations with many being aggregious to the point I was routed into the terminal for counseling. I am happy to admit though I haven’t had any in a few months. So don’t worry about one minute you will be just fine.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Patrick C.'s Comment
member avatar

I have violated my clock by a lot more than a minute on more than one occasion. I'm still employed. Don't sweat it. Crap happens.

Just give logs a call and let them know that you know and I'm sure they will wave their magic wand.

Pete B.'s Comment
member avatar

If you haven’t already, send in a message or phone call, to whomever you report to, acknowledging your violation. Let them know that you know that you screwed up; and own it. Don’t blame it on any other drivers or circumstances. Just promise to trip plan better and that you won’t do it again. And then don’t do it again. You shouldn’t run any of your clocks down to the last minute; you need to allow yourself time for unforeseen circumstances.

Pianoman's Comment
member avatar

One minute is no big deal. Don't make a habit of it, of course, but a one-time slip-up like that is nothing to sweat about at all.

Sgt. Diddly's Comment
member avatar

Thanks everyone. I was able to edit my pre/post trip down to one minute, and "break off duty" for two minutes, so when I approved it for the day, I was actually two minutes prior to violation lol. I really was nervous about it though. I know if I had some time in with the company it wouldn't be an issue, but being a new driver I thought it would look negatively on my time management and trip planning skills.

mikemotorbike's Comment
member avatar

Thanks everyone. I was able to edit my pre/post trip down to one minute, and "break off duty" for two minutes, so when I approved it for the day, I was actually two minutes prior to violation lol. I really was nervous about it though. I know if I had some time in with the company it wouldn't be an issue, but being a new driver I thought it would look negatively on my time management and trip planning skills.

Any experienced truckers care to offer newbies some guidance on possible repercussions from logbook redaction?

Logbook:

A written or electronic record of a driver's duty status which must be maintained at all times. The driver records the amount of time spent driving, on-duty not driving, in the sleeper berth, or off duty. The enforcement of the Hours Of Service Rules (HOS) are based upon the entries put in a driver's logbook.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

Steve L.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

Thanks everyone. I was able to edit my pre/post trip down to one minute, and "break off duty" for two minutes, so when I approved it for the day, I was actually two minutes prior to violation lol. I really was nervous about it though. I know if I had some time in with the company it wouldn't be an issue, but being a new driver I thought it would look negatively on my time management and trip planning skills.

double-quotes-end.png

Any experienced truckers care to offer newbies some guidance on possible repercussions from logbook redaction?

Umm...yes. I’ll take a one-time hit with my company (or anyone else) for a one-minute violation that can be explained instead of a falsified log entry.

Hopefully nothing comes of it. Of course, you can change it back if you haven’t already approved it.

Good luck!

Logbook:

A written or electronic record of a driver's duty status which must be maintained at all times. The driver records the amount of time spent driving, on-duty not driving, in the sleeper berth, or off duty. The enforcement of the Hours Of Service Rules (HOS) are based upon the entries put in a driver's logbook.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

icecold24k's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

Thanks everyone. I was able to edit my pre/post trip down to one minute, and "break off duty" for two minutes, so when I approved it for the day, I was actually two minutes prior to violation lol. I really was nervous about it though. I know if I had some time in with the company it wouldn't be an issue, but being a new driver I thought it would look negatively on my time management and trip planning skills.

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

Any experienced truckers care to offer newbies some guidance on possible repercussions from logbook redaction?

double-quotes-end.png

Umm...yes. I’ll take a one-time hit with my company (or anyone else) for a one-minute violation that can be explained instead of a falsified log entry.

Hopefully nothing comes of it. Of course, you can change it back if you haven’t already approved it.

Good luck!

Actually when I go over on drive time now by a few minutes on accident I call the log department and she does the exact same thing he just did. They move the few minutes of time over and borrow it from somewhere else to make it legal again.

Logbook:

A written or electronic record of a driver's duty status which must be maintained at all times. The driver records the amount of time spent driving, on-duty not driving, in the sleeper berth, or off duty. The enforcement of the Hours Of Service Rules (HOS) are based upon the entries put in a driver's logbook.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

Steve L.'s Comment
member avatar

You can make the time appear legal, but if a DOT Officer reviews your logs and asks you to prove you can do a pre-trip in one minute, good luck.

If the company wants to make changes, that’s on them. If I lie about my times, it’s on me. You make the decision you can live with and move on.

I still don’t think anyone would’ve been upset with one minute over when it could be explained AND it isn’t a regular habit.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Page 1 of 2 Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More