CDL Training (Roehl Specifically)

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Brian's Comment
member avatar

Hello all!

I have a few questions about CDL training on what I should be prepared for? I've been reading these forums for quite awhile, probably two months since I've decided to get my CDL.

I'm a 25 year old married man, and my wife wants me to pursue the dream I've always wanted. I'm educated, I do have my bachelor's but nothing in my field pays what I want and that resorted myself working in manufacturing. I'm fine financially if I stayed this route, but I'm not fine doing something I'll hate every day.

So my questions I'm curious about is if anyone has taken the Roehl Training Course? If so what have you thought about it? I live in Wisconsin, so it's closer to my hometown, but I'll have to stay in Marshfield for training as I'm too far away. What is lodging like through the company training? When would the best time to apply be? I need to have enough money saved up to pay for the school, and also in the bank for bills as I'll be quitting my job when I get accepted to school.

I'm currently studying more and more every day. I'll be taking my FedMed Exam in a few days, so I'll have that ready for when I take my permit exam. I'll also be taking my HAZMAT as well because I feel it would be best to have that before training, it allows me to have that for one year before I get my CDL to be fully endorsed. I'm currently working full-time and studying in the evening.

Now, I'm looking for company paid training as I can not afford to quit my job and pay $4k out of pocket to attend a private school for three weeks. That would not be doable, I like how Roehl will pay if you get hired.

I've been using this site to help me, and it's been wonderful!

Is there anything I should know about the exams for Wisconsin? Any and all help would be greatly appreciated as my new journey will be starting soon.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Scott L.'s Comment
member avatar

I went through Roehl's school. If you agree to drive 120,000 miles for them, (approx 1 yr), they'll cover the costs of school. Only thing you'll have to come up with is lodging ($400), and license fees. Meals. I'd apply right away because it takes a few weeks to go through the application process and get registered in school. I'd highly recommend them. Their training is fantastic. Make sure you go through Brett's High Road Training Program. I did and was very prepared going to the school. Makes a huge difference.

Brian's Comment
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How Long Was The Training Period Before You Got IntoYour OwnTruck? Were You Able To Take The TRuck Home?

Sorry My Phone IS Typing Strangely.

Joe B.'s Comment
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How Long Was The Training Period Before You Got IntoYour OwnTruck? Were You Able To Take The TRuck Home?

Sorry My Phone IS Typing Strangely.

I am going to RDTC with Roehl also. There are 3 phases to the training.

#1 Class and Driving for 3 weeks $2,800 which you can pay or they will after 120,000 miles @ 1 year driving #2 Drive with your trainer for up to 13 days and you are paid $90 a day while doing this. #3 You will then get your own truck which you will drive OTR full time out 11-14 days home 3 and you will be paid @.32-36CPM for about 6 weeks and you will have a full time manager at all times available to you for questions etc.

After you complete all 3 phases you will then go to the fleet you picked from the beginning. Reefer , Flatbed, Curtain side, Flatbed or Dry Van at the same rate from phase 3. You then get a .02 raise at 90 days and 6 months etc.

BEST OF LUCK TO YOU!

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Brian's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

How Long Was The Training Period Before You Got IntoYour OwnTruck? Were You Able To Take The TRuck Home?

Sorry My Phone IS Typing Strangely.

double-quotes-end.png

I am going to RDTC with Roehl also. There are 3 phases to the training.

#1 Class and Driving for 3 weeks $2,800 which you can pay or they will after 120,000 miles @ 1 year driving #2 Drive with your trainer for up to 13 days and you are paid $90 a day while doing this. #3 You will then get your own truck which you will drive OTR full time out 11-14 days home 3 and you will be paid @.32-36CPM for about 6 weeks and you will have a full time manager at all times available to you for questions etc.

After you complete all 3 phases you will then go to the fleet you picked from the beginning. Reefer , Flatbed, Curtain side, Flatbed or Dry Van at the same rate from phase 3. You then get a .02 raise at 90 days and 6 months etc.

BEST OF LUCK TO YOU!

Thank you for all your information. I wish the best to you on your journey. I'm preparing for more information that anyone will have.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Stacy R.'s Comment
member avatar

Is there anything I should know about the exams for Wisconsin? Any and all help would be greatly appreciated as my new journey will be starting soon.

You will take your written CDL permit test in your state. Roehl will give you an open book written test and then Roehl will give your a CDL style road test and they will give you your CDL in WI. Then you need to transfer it to your home state when you go home before you head out on your own.

Here is info about your 3 weeks at RDTC

WEEK 1 (Monday–Saturday) Every journey begins with a first step. Yours will begin the first day when you get behind the wheel with an RDTC certified experienced instructor right beside you. During your first week, you will learn how to safely operate a truck and trailer in a controlled, range environment and on public roadways. We have a Range course to get you started and plenty of rural roads to help you develop your skills before we move the training into a more traffic populated environment. You'll learn how to complete a full pre-trip inspection to ensure your truck and trailer are in working order, safe to operate, and meets the federal requirements of all equipment traveling the roadway. Homework and training assignments will focus on motor carrier regulations, safety and some of the basic mechanical systems of a diesel truck and trailer. We'll work towards training you and getting you prepared to test for your CDL. Our goal is to train you to be a safe, competent, professional over-the-road driver in Roehl's fleet.

WEEK 2 (Monday–Saturday) You'll be surprised by how much you've already learned after just one week in RDTC's training environment. In the second week, your driving skills and knowledge will quickly advance. You'll refine driving skills and learn how to manage your vehicle in close-quarter areas giving you the self-confidence to handle your truck and trailer around other motorists you share the roads with. Given more instruction and practice driving, you'll work on forward motion skills and further develop your shifting by learning accelerated shifting techniques. Using the Range, we'll introduce you to a variety of backing and turning maneuvers. During this week, the roads you will drive on are within the city limits and more challenging. In this environment you need to know what's happening at all times. You will need to bring all of your learning together - shifting, turning, backing and visually scanning your driving environment paying close attention to the motorists sharing the roads with you. It's not just about you, when you're a professional driver you have to consider the actions of others and anticipate what they might do. RDTC cares about everyone's safety and well being, we need you to as well.

WEEK 3 (Monday–Friday) By the third week, you'll know your way around a truck, know how to identify common mechanical repairs, shift like a pro and understand how to safely handle your vehicle under various road and traffic conditions. But, there's more to being a professional driver than that. So, during this week, we will put more concerted focus on the other responsibilities of an over-the-road driver. Federal, state, local regulations - if you are driving you are responsible for knowing and meeting all of them. We train you by spending time learning the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations and the national network of highways. You'll learn about the Hours of Service Regulations, how to effectively and legally trip plan, review permitting and required documents. You'll learn The Roehl Way of Protective Driving along with the policies and procedures that lead to driver success with Roehl. Classroom lessons and homework will have you planning trips and completing various regulatory assignments. And, there's still behind the wheel time so you can refine your driving skills and validate that you are ready to take the next step in your career as a safe, prepared and confident professional driver.

Pre-trip Inspection:

A pre-trip inspection is a thorough inspection of the truck completed before driving for the first time each day.

Federal and state laws require that drivers inspect their vehicles. Federal and state inspectors also may inspect your vehicles. If they judge a vehicle to be unsafe, they will put it “out of service” until it is repaired.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

The only questions I see that haven't been answered are regarding the best time to apply and how much money to save up.

The best time to apply is anywhere between now and maybe mid-October. We're entering the busiest time of the year for trucking - back to school all the way through Christmas. After Christmas things slow down considerably for a few months. So getting in on the busy season is a great time to get started.

As far as money to save up, you will want a minimum of $500, preferably closer to $1000 to cover the costs of food and miscellaneous items that come up during training. And that's not counting any expenses the school requires like lodging.

Otherwise, you seem to have everything in order. Keep working through the High Road CDL Training Program and save up a few bucks. Apply to any Company-Sponsored Training Programs you're interested in and get a dialogue going with the recruiters. That's about all you can do right now.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Company-sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

Steve B.'s Comment
member avatar

At roehl they are there to take the best and discard the rest. the training is mental as well and being able to drive and maneuver the truck. If you make it into their school it doesn't guarantee you a job a roehl. I've heard of people ended up with at other companies after doing the RDTC school. Also at the end of each day you're not done - there will be homework. Be prepared to work hard - but in the long run it is worth it.

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