Blood Pressure

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Cory B.'s Comment
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I currently drive a straight truck, and have my DOT medical card. Have had it for 5 years. Every time I get my exam, they comment on my blood pressure being elevated, but i pass anyway. Are trucking companies more rigorous when it comes to this? I don't know what my numbers are, and not sure if it's something I should be worried about. I haven't seen a doctor or anything about it.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Ernie S. (AKA Old Salty D's Comment
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I currently drive a straight truck, and have my DOT medical card. Have had it for 5 years. Every time I get my exam, they comment on my blood pressure being elevated, but i pass anyway. Are trucking companies more rigorous when it comes to this? I don't know what my numbers are, and not sure if it's something I should be worried about. I haven't seen a doctor or anything about it.

If your BP is 140/90 (that is the max allowed), you will pass. However, I would go get it checked to be sure. Sure would be a bummer if you get sent home because it is border line or above when it can be controlled and not be an issue. If you do get put onto meds, you will only be able to get a 1 year DOT medical card if that happens (I know because that's what happens with me).

Ernie

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Hoofinit's Comment
member avatar

I currently drive a straight truck, and have my DOT medical card. Have had it for 5 years. Every time I get my exam, they comment on my blood pressure being elevated, but i pass anyway. Are trucking companies more rigorous when it comes to this? I don't know what my numbers are, and not sure if it's something I should be worried about. I haven't seen a doctor or anything about it.

Elevated blood is usually not something to worry about. There is something called "white coat" syndrome where your BP rises around doctors. I get that myself. You should have an idea of what your BP runs so not to worry. You can get a BP machine that goes on the wrist to monitor it yourself. BP Friday fluctuates throughout the day so it will vary. In the trucking business, really any stressful work, it's really important to know where you stand with your health. It could mean your life or the lives of those around you.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Stevo Reno's Comment
member avatar

Yeah I get the "White Coat" thing every time lol last job physical lady mentioned my BP I said "yeah sitting here dang near buck naked 45 minutes, waiting for YOU" of course its UP lol I got my moms lil machine thingy she used. I smoke and drink tons of coffee.......highest was like 141/92 pulse of 98........took it other day relaxed, breathing deeper (and finishing up a smoke) got anywhere from 114/73 pulse 88 to 142/70 pulse 84 (3 were on lowest end) A Year later, just finishing healing broken leg, relearning to walk, my BP can be anywhere on the charts.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

We have a lot of information in our trucker's wiki on blood pressure requirements for the DOT physical and hypertension regulations, medications, and tips for lowering your blood pressure.

Basically 140/90 is the limit. Anything above that and you will have to regulate it with DOT approved medications.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Hypertension:

Abnormally high blood pressure.

Cory B.'s Comment
member avatar

We have a lot of information in our trucker's wiki on blood pressure requirements for the DOT physical and hypertension regulations, medications, and tips for lowering your blood pressure.

Basically 140/90 is the limit. Anything above that and you will have to regulate it with DOT approved medications.

Thanks for the info everyone. I ran into a Wal-Mart today to check my pressure at their free machine.

My initial result was 140/95, but my next two were significantly lower.

I'm guessing because I had to walk from the parking lot and into the store resulted in the elevated initial result. And I usually walk fairly quickly, always have. But as I sat there and relaxed, it was a lot lower. 118/ I forget the second number.

Is this something I should worry about? Thanks again for the help.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Hypertension:

Abnormally high blood pressure.

Sclose757's Comment
member avatar
double-quotes-start.png

We have a lot of information in our trucker's wiki on blood pressure requirements for the DOT physical and hypertension regulations, medications, and tips for lowering your blood pressure.

Basically 140/90 is the limit. Anything above that and you will have to regulate it with DOT approved medications.

double-quotes-end.png

Thanks for the info everyone. I ran into a Wal-Mart today to check my pressure at their free machine.

My initial result was 140/95, but my next two were significantly lower.

I'm guessing because I had to walk from the parking lot and into the store resulted in the elevated initial result. And I usually walk fairly quickly, always have. But as I sat there and relaxed, it was a lot lower. 118/ I forget the second number.

Is this something I should worry about? Thanks again for the help.

Never trust those things!

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Hypertension:

Abnormally high blood pressure.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
Is this something I should worry about?

Well it depends. As long as you can get it down below 140/90 you're good to go. If you can't then you'll have to get some blood pressure medication to get your DOT physical card. It's quite common for people to test high during the physical because they're nervous and all that. They'll always let you relax and re-test to see if it will come down, the same way you did at the store.

I would at least look at the tips for getting your blood pressure down in the days leading up to the exam just to be safe.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Cory B.'s Comment
member avatar

I would at least look at the tips for getting your blood pressure down in the days leading up to the exam just to be safe.

Thanks Brett! I have read it, and will do my best! It's a good thing that I already eat a lot of fruits and vegetables on a daily basis. I'll have to try and find beet juice, never heard of it!

I am wondering if I will be able to continue eating fruits and vegetables on the road, however. I stopped into a TA and Flying J the other day, out of curiosity, and didn't really find anything in the way of healthy eating. I was disappointed.

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

Most drivers carry a small cooler/refrigerator with them and hit grocery stores and Walmarts to stock up on healthier, less expensive foods than you'll find in truck stops. That's the way to go.

Subway is pretty healthy and most fast food places have some sort of salads and such. Some of the truck stops will carry a little fruit in the stores. If you try hard enough you can usually scrape up some reasonable food from truck stops along the way. But grocery stores are the way to go whenever possible.

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