That Darned Clock Lol

Topic 10382 | Page 1

Page 1 of 1
Logan M.'s Comment
member avatar

Does anyone else feel like managing the clock is more work than driving when new?

I've been doing pretty well since I went solo I've ran 3200 miles my first week 3000 this week and then my lack of clock management starting biting myself in the but.

My question is without taking a reset if I'm trying to fix my 70( meaning I ran too many 10- 11 hour days) and I have a few days where I only get 5 or 6 hours back, what is the best way to do so with the smallest impact on my miles. I am trying to run around 8.5 hours when I can afford to but i had to repower a load and burned what I had saved. So should I keep trying to level it out or is there a better way to go about it?

Thanks in advance you guys provide so much help I am truly grateful that each of you are here to help rookies like me out

Steve L.'s Comment
member avatar

See if your DM , Dispatcher or whatever your company calls them, can get you a load that you pick up, but doesn't have to be delivered until two days later and isn't a ton of miles. This allows you to complete your 34 while under a load. I've done this a couple of times.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Logan M.'s Comment
member avatar

See if your DM , Dispatcher or whatever your company calls them, can get you a load that you pick up, but doesn't have to be delivered until two days later and isn't a ton of miles. This allows you to complete your 34 while under a load. I've done this a couple of times.

I'm on a dedicated tn to mi run they are flexible appointments so I could do talk to them about pushing one out enough for me to do it.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Pick/Grin's Comment
member avatar

Dispatchers should be able to work around the little booboos. If you only get a few hours back, remind them so they don't stick you with something impossible.

I had a day where I'd only get three hours total of drive time in, called dispatch, and they switched my load for something more manageable. If you see a potential problem, send a message in as soon as possible. They err much like us, so plan on them not noticing your lack of hours.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Logan is watching the clock:

My question is without taking a reset if I'm trying to fix my 70( meaning I ran too many 10- 11 hour days) and I have a few days where I only get 5 or 6 hours back, what is the best way to do so with the smallest impact on my miles.

What you are describing is called "Running on your Recaps" or something. It's rare to drive those 8-1/2 hr. days all the time. Look on your Qualcomm: Hours of Service/Status tab for "Hrs to be gained" and "Hrs Gained in 2 Days". Those are your drive and duty hours you get back at midnight. (00h 00m means you're not on recaps, yet.) Also, on the 8-Days tab, there's a On-Duty column that shows those same duty hours - from the bottom up.

Neat trick: of you are planning to go past midnight, and you can legally drive at least to that magic moment, you automatically get the "next day's" recap hours. (But that's all you get for the next day! Don't use them frivilosly!)

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Logan M.'s Comment
member avatar

Basically I got myself stuck in the cycle I had myself on a semi day schedule seeing that I'm running a dedicated account and all they do is ask for my eta. Then lately I've been running off nothing but what I was getting back so for a few days I was running at midnight, only able to run until 6am then shut down until midnight again

Dave D. (Armyman)'s Comment
member avatar

If you want to continue your "recap" you need to try to run as few hours as possible, until you get to a day, where you ran something like 11 to 13 hours and try to run 8 or 9 hours on that day. You are basically trying to even your hours out. 70 divided by 8 equals... 70/8= 8.75.

That is something to remember when running OTR. You can't run 14 hours everyday.

Dave

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Lawrence H.'s Comment
member avatar

No because running so hard turns days into weeks, and weeks into years and so on. I was only supposed to be local and I always gotta ask someone what day of the week and what date it is.

Logan M.'s Comment
member avatar

Ok I gotcha I got 11 back last night I only ran 8 today so I'm saving those 3. Tomorrow will be a full day but it'll be the last 10-11 hour day on my clock I'll be all 8-9 after that, that's a big if but we'll see how it all works out

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Page 1 of 1

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More