My State Forbids CDL Training Programs To Teach Use Of Jake Brake

Topic 10472 | Page 1

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Susan D. 's Comment
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The other day in class, we were discussing mountain driving/downhill grades. Ya know.. low gear, brake at your max speed til 5 mph below, etc, rinse and repeat.

Well I asked the instructor why the goal wouldn't be to use your service brakes as little as possible, by utilizing a low gear, and low/high jakes.

His response was "The state prohibits us from teaching anything about engine brakes, so therefore we will not be covering them, or their use." I was stunned.

Is this the "normal" for CDL training schools around the country?

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Dennis R. (Greatest Drive's Comment
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Believe it or not,every truck isnt equipped with a jake..its an option. My school taught nothing about engine braking.

Scott O.'s Comment
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I've been to two schools and they didn't teach us about them... Never really thought to ask but I'm sure cuz like said above not all trucks have them...

Susan D. 's Comment
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Lol.. I've never seen a truck without one. I was really surprised that the state actually prohibits them from covering them.

Robert B. (The Dragon) ye's Comment
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For many years, trucks didn't have them. Today, most don't have a true Jake Brake, it's an engine retarder and not nearly as powerful. Honestly, if you're taught to drive properly and let the truck do the work, you really don't need it.

Robert B. (The Dragon) ye's Comment
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They do sound purty when singing through big diameter pipes though.

Pick/Grin's Comment
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It wasn't covered in IN, so I didn't fully understand it when I actually got to use one. I didn't realize that rpm's need to be around 1250 to prevent potential damage, so in my first week I went through TN hitting 1600 but luckily I read the manual and was a little more perceptive afterwards haha

Dave D. (Armyman)'s Comment
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One truck I was in didn't have them. They discussed the Engine Brake at my school. They also discussed what happens when going down hill, in too high a gear.

Dave

Susan D. 's Comment
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What we were actually discussing was downhill grades, runaway ramps, and that the correct answers on the exams regarding runaway ramps is that they "are designed to minimize damage to a rig." Hahaha. Funny since they'll completely trash a truck.

Our class is a trip. We have sooo many people in our class I'd never want to ride with in a truck it ain't even funny. The few of us who are serious are already plotting how we're going to finesse avoiding being in a truck with the rest of the students. Only me and another guy just a bit older than me have driven one before.. he used to drive OTR and hasn't driven in about same time period as me and is required to take the course in order to get a job driving, despite that he drove for 10 years or so. We may not have much to worry about if they can't pass the tests to get their permit (Yes, its THAT bad).

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
We have sooo many people in our class I'd never want to ride with in a truck it ain't even funny. The few of us who are serious are already plotting how we're going to finesse avoiding being in a truck with the rest of the students

It's rather appalling how many people fail to take their training seriously. That's one of the reasons why Company-Sponsored Training Programs send so many people home. They don't listen, they don't learn much, they have terrible attitudes, and they don't take any of it seriously. They seem to think driving a truck is just about the same as driving a big car and it's nothing to get too worked up about.

Fortunately a lot of people begin to come around after embarrassing themselves in the beginning trying to shift or back up. It sinks in quickly how difficult it is.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Company-sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

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