Jeep Wrangler

Topic 10514 | Page 2

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Cwc's Comment
member avatar

And to answer your question about driving in snow well... I live in south VA. and it kinda snows here but I'm from Indiana where it actually snows and wranglers do ok in it as long as you take it easy... really short wheel base so they will spin around on you if your not careful. I don't think I've ever really owned a practical vehicle.

Travis T.'s Comment
member avatar

Not sure what year youre looking at but make sure it's a 4.0L engine. Yes the gas consumption will be nothing to brag about but you can't destroy those engines. I have a 99 Grand with 166,000 and just made a cross country move from WV to Phoenix, AZ and it purred like a kitten. 300,000 is very average for these vehicles as long as it's been maintained.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Stevo Reno's Comment
member avatar

My buddy had an '02 PT Cruiser yeah laugh lol, w/ 5 speed. Normal brake jobs every so often,regular oil changes, 2 clutches,2 timing belts, (I hated doing those timing belts, on any PT) 1 radiator and few odds n ends, 365,000 miles til it gave up the ghost...Work car since he is a Canon Copier tech= tons miles then....He just got a 2nd PT 5 speed....Any vehicle make lasts, if you take care of it. Boss I had @ Pepsi had 400,000 on his S-10 Blazer....My '92 1500 silverado had 380,000 on the clock when I sold it to my brother....Then he tore it up!

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Phil O.'s Comment
member avatar

I've come across a 98 Wrangler with 95,000 miles on it for a pretty reasonable price.

My old jeep cherokee was a 1999 and had some trans problems at about 100,000 miles. Has anyone else come across that problem? I'd hate to make the purchase then have to put a bunch of money/work into it.

John L.'s Comment
member avatar

I know this isn't directly trucking related, but my pick up broke down recently and unfortunately it won't run anymore (Got 230,000 miles out of it though!). I've always wanted a jeep wrangler and was thinking about purchasing that's been pre-owned.

Does anyone have any tips/information/advice on them? Just curious.

Thanks!

I have sold them for a long time. They have one of the highest resale values out there and will last a long time. Hands down. If you want one then get it. I can promise you won't go wrong.

Rolling Thunder's Comment
member avatar

I have a 97 Wrangler 4.0 with a straight six motor and a 5 speed manual transmission that I bought in 2009. It now has over 170,000 miles on it. The only things I have had to replace are a starter, shocks, tires, front bearings, tie rod, u joints and brakes. That's it except for normal tune ups.

I love it and will not part with it for anything.

Paul J.'s Comment
member avatar

I've got a 92 YJ (the ******* Wrangler with the rectangular headlights(. I bought it when I was living in Alaska. Rarely ever had to put it in 4wd.

Wife has a 2005 Rubicon Wrangler that she insisted on keeping in 4wd whenever there was a trace of snow.

It's all in how you drive it. Drive it like it's only a 2wd, take it easy on it and it'll motor right along. My YJ has the 2.5 motor and 33" tired, tube bumpers front and rear, nerf bars on the side, heavy duty leaf springs. It also has an 8,000lb warn wench on the front and one of those long winches on the back bumper. That and all my ham radios, scanners, cb's and antennas and that's pretty much it.

The hoghway that goes East out of California into vegas that has a LONG truckers lane on it, I was in the truckers lane going from 4th to 3rd gear and getting blow off the road by the big trucks. It's got a 5 speed manual, 5th gear is only for making it feel like a roller coaster ride going down hill.

Check on a fuel tank mod. I took mine from a 15 gallon tank to just over 20 gallons. And with the **** poor mileage that thing gets, the extra 5 gallons really helps. Basically, you guy the hose where it goes down into the tank by about 6 inches. The extra length is to keep the gas from pouring out on steep inclines. With that 2.5, there aren't many steep inclines you can make it up.

I tow mine behind my RV when my company decides I need to work out of Vegas, Phoenix, or California for an extended time.

I think if the right deal were to come along, I'd sell or trade it off.. Without my radios of course..

If you go dropping a bigger motor in it, you'll need bigger axles and the works. That's when it gets expensive.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Phil O.'s Comment
member avatar

Thanks for the input guys!

Has anyone else with the late 90's early 2000's models had trans problems around 100,000 miles? I've heard it from one or two other people, just wondering if this is a common problem.

Rolling Thunder's Comment
member avatar

Thanks for the input guys!

Has anyone else with the late 90's early 2000's models had trans problems around 100,000 miles? I've heard it from one or two other people, just wondering if this is a common problem.

Nope

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