My Prime PSD Experience

Topic 10524 | Page 12

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Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

Rainy, thanks a lot for answering all my questions. Im filling out an application with Prime tomorrow. There is no time like the present. Ive been researching companies for months now and I feel like they are best suited for my needs. Im really excited and nervous to start. I know there is so much I need to learn and will be consistently learn of I decide to pursue this as a career. Im really mainly concerned about actually getting my CDL. What is really nervewrecking is the idea of them just sending me home if I dont pass my road test etc. Ive beed studying for the permit relentlessly using the High Road Training which has been great. Ive really got nothing to lose ar this point. I really want to do this. You and many of the other members here have been really inspiring and helped motivate me in making this decision. I know i can do this. Thanks again and stay safe!

First BREATHE lol and calm. If you do the High Road...I promise you will pass on your first try of the written test.

As for the road test...they don't send you home on the first try. You have 3 tries for each part. The pretrip, the backing and the road test. If you pass the pretrip and backing but fail the road test three times. Yeah you get sent home because state law says you can only test 3 times in one year. BUT if you go back to NJ and take the test and pass....Prime will hire you.

By the time you get to the exam, you will have driven 10k miles or so. People usually fail due to nerves, not being unprepared. The trainers and the examiners want you to pass. There's is tons of support.

My real name is Kirsten Rothlander so look me up if you need anything 856 283 8800

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
's Comment
member avatar

Thanks so much Rainy D. and the other forum members for sharing your experiences! Months/Years later, these diaries are still so helpful to those of us wanting 'inside information.'

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

Thanks so much Rainy D. and the other forum members for sharing your experiences! Months/Years later, these diaries are still so helpful to those of us wanting 'inside information.'

Hi Nicole...I see you have been checking out the Prime threads, so feel free to ask anything!!

Its been almost two years since I hopped on that bus...boy does time fly...and I have loved every day.

Do I get frustrated... Sure. Have a bad day,.of course. But Prime was definitely the right choice for me and I don't regret it.

I'm so close to becoming completely debt free plus having a decent start on my 401k. I love my FM and can run hard or go slower when I want. I get "10/4 thanks". My FM understand sometimes you need a little break from time to time No biggie

Put aside any reservations you may have about being a woman. That is a load of crap!

There are plenty of us here on the forum OTR...you can do it too if you want. So ask away

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
's Comment
member avatar
Hi Nicole...I see you have been checking out the Prime threads, so feel free to ask anything!!

Rainy, thanks so much for the encouragement and for sharing your personal feelings!

I'm strongly leaning toward Prime after reading so many thorough and great diaries and other posts here on truckingtruth.com. I'm looking at some timelines to begin. It will most likely be in November or February/March. As far as weather, would the smarter choice be the later dates (the end of winter) or should winter even be a factor in my decision?

Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

Great question...I came so that I would be in training in winter. There's two theories...you have a trainer but are nervous to learn everything so snow might make you more nervous and if you wait you could have six months solo before the next winter comes....meaning you would handle the rig better and feel more comfortable.

My theory was better for me to have someone next to me in winter. Glad I did...CO and WY still get blizzards in MAY!! My first couple weeks out I went through WY a couple times. Coming back I spent easter under two feet of snow there. In March lol

However, most trainers are lease ops and get to decide where they will drive. So ask the potential trainer if winter conditions are possible if you want the training in winter.

Turtle's Comment
member avatar

I too chose to train during winter, just for the extra safety net of having my trainer close by for guidance. I'm very glad I did. From how to drive the rig to how to chain up, I learned alot with him helping.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

This has always been an interesting question because I'm honestly not sure what the best way would be.

My first instinct would be to say it's better to learn how to drive in the spring or summer so you have six months of experience handling that rig in tight parking lots, getting it safely down mountains, backing into tight spots, developing better defensive driving techniques, managing your time, getting your shifting down, and navigating tough city traffic. Then, when it's time to get into the snow the only thing you really have to worry about is learning to judge the road conditions and handle slick roads. You're not worrying about 10,000 other things at once because you've already gotten those out of the way.

But two of you already said you were glad you learned in the winter.

The problem is that no one can try each method from scratch to determine which one is better.

Ya know, I think this is a good topic for one of our articles. I might start a new conversation just about this topic and get some opinions from everyone to use for the article.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

That's a cool idea Brett. My friend was raised down south and never saw snow. She was terrified to drive a rig in it so went to training in spring. After nine months of driving ng solo she hit her first snow storm.

She shut down then felt like a bum. I tried to explain that she did the right thing, but it's hard to comprehend at first. Now she trucks along in the winter.

's Comment
member avatar

Thanks for your responses! Since there's no absolute right answer, it's great to know the advantages of each time frame. thank-you-2.gif

Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

Thanks for your responses! Since there's no absolute right answer, it's great to know the advantages of each time frame. thank-you-2.gif

At first I was terrified about the winter driving, but I honestly drive it like my car...slow and with lots of distance

I've realized that drivers who are sensible and defensive in cars drive rigs safely. Those who are aggressive and speed demons have accidents.

I don't remember if I posted it on this thread, but my first solo run through WY was like three weeks after I got my truck. I drove a long distance in 6th & 7th gear. A truck came flying past me and jacknifed then went across the median and hit on coming traffic.

I still have a job and I bet he doesn't. I felt like crap cause it took most of my shift to drive like 180 miles. I kept apologizing to my FM. He told me I did great and parked safely.

Just take it slow with flashers. If you see ice, park it.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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