Do Any Of You Use An App To Help You Placard Your Cargo Correctly?

Topic 10714 | Page 1

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Anttjuan R.'s Comment
member avatar

I have a hazmat endorsement but never really carried a hazmat load because I don't really know how to placard correctly and I've heard stories where people get ticketed at weigh stations for having improper hazmat placards. I am thinking about downloading an app called "Hazmat Placard Wizard Mobile" where you simply punch in data from you bill of lading and it will tell you the correct placards to put on. But I'd also like to learn for myself just to double check. How did YOU learn and is there a website you recommend that makes it easy to understand? And have you ever used a hazmat app such as I described?

I also remember learning in orientation that the placards must be placed at least 3 feet away from any sign or logo but I always see trucks having them way less than 3 feet, and sometimes even right next to the logo. I want to know as much as I can about hazmat. And just to make sure, all truck drivers in the U.S. carry the same little orange hazmat book in their truck right? That way I know we're on the same page.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

Anttjuan R.'s Comment
member avatar

Correction: The app is actually called "Placard Wizard Mobile".

Daniel B.'s Comment
member avatar

I personally would never trust an app for something this important and crucial.

I've hauled tons of hazmat , and every time I watch them load my trailer and I pay attention to the freight and its hazards. Shippers will always provide you with the placards for your specific load, however, it's your job to triple check their work. If you were paying attention during loading and reading all the information on the individual pallets/products then you'll know if the placards the shipper gave you are correct.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Jetguy's Comment
member avatar

I personally would never trust an app for something this important and crucial.

I've hauled tons of hazmat , and every time I watch them load my trailer and I pay attention to the freight and its hazards. Shippers will always provide you with the placards for your specific load, however, it's your job to triple check their work. If you were paying attention during loading and reading all the information on the individual pallets/products then you'll know if the placards the shipper gave you are correct.

Thanks Daniel. Good advice- watching hazmat being loaded and reading the contents. That's one of the reasons I follow this forum daily- the good advice to get job done absolutely right.

How about watching loading of high value loads? To make sure everything is done correctly?

I would think sometimes the supplier would say "No you can not watch".

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Daniel B.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

I personally would never trust an app for something this important and crucial.

I've hauled tons of hazmat , and every time I watch them load my trailer and I pay attention to the freight and its hazards. Shippers will always provide you with the placards for your specific load, however, it's your job to triple check their work. If you were paying attention during loading and reading all the information on the individual pallets/products then you'll know if the placards the shipper gave you are correct.

double-quotes-end.png

Thanks Daniel. Good advice- watching hazmat being loaded and reading the contents. That's one of the reasons I follow this forum daily- the good advice to get job done absolutely right.

How about watching loading of high value loads? To make sure everything is done correctly?

I would think sometimes the supplier would say "No you can not watch".

Shippers that deal with High-Value Freight almost never allow you to watch them load it. Often times they don't even want you to know what the product(s) are that they're shipping, and they'll never tell you the exact worth of the load. They simply want you to do the driving and nothing else. Its always a great idea to ask if you can watch them load it and maybe you'll get lucky and they'll let you, but the chances are very slim. If you do get to watch them load the trailer you're looking for:

1: Any damages to the products and/or boxes.

2: Count the cases and pallets and ensure that the Bill of Lading matches your counts.

3: The trailer is loaded correctly and in a way that will prevent damages to the product.

4: Inspect the quality of the pallets. You don't want a product loaded on a pallet that is falling apart. It could lean during transit and cause major damage.

5: Verify the temperature of the freight (if applicable) and the Seal/Trailer # as well as the destination.

If there's any discrepancies call your Fleet Manager immediately before signing the Bill of Lading. Most companies require a minimum of 6 months before they'll even consider assigning you a High Value load so don't be under the impression that you'll be going through this during week 3.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Fleet Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Dave H.'s Comment
member avatar

Agreed. Get the placards at the shipper before you head out. you just need the check your load and BOL and make sure your placards match up, for the most part. Don't be afraid to use your books as a reference if you aren't sure about something, or if you aren't sure you are placarding correctly.

I would also ask for a spare set of placards if you are planning on going through significant weather. Just a good idea I figured I'd pass on. I have had placards get so wet that they literally found their way out of the placard holder on the trailer and flew off. Fortunately I found it before DOT did when I stopped for my 30.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Michael R.'s Comment
member avatar

Hello,

Since our software was being discussed we thought we would be able to add some value to the conversation.

Placard Wizard is currently in use by at least two of the top 5 carriers in the U.S. as well as many small to medium sized firms. The same algorithm that drives our enterprise software for company intranets and on the web is the same one used in our mobile apps and windows desktop app.

We've been developing and refining our software since 2002 and we hope it offers value to our customers no matter what platform they are using.

If you need help using the app please check out our website where you can receive links to youtube videos as well as contact our support.

http://placardwizardapp.com

Thank You!

Placard Wizard

DWI:

Driving While Intoxicated

PJ's Comment
member avatar

I haul alot of hazmat these days. Trailer placard holders are not always the tightest in the world. I have a clear piece of plexiglass cut to fit. Placard goes in and then the clear piece over it. It protects it from the weather very nicely. I take my book and paperclip the correct pages for what I have. Remember the bills have to be within your reach while behind the wheel. When you leave the truck they need to be on the driver seat or door pocket. If DOT pulls you in at a scale and tells you to bring your paperwork in make damn sure a copy of that bill is on your seat. Also take your book inside with you. If they see you know what your doing its usually no big thing at all.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

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