Is Trucking The Right Move For Me !

Topic 11184 | Page 1

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Twisted sister 's Comment
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Well I've been out of school since sept .. My first trainer experience was scary, maybe it was me, I'm starting to second guess myself maybe I'm not good enough to be a trucker. I do know I put a lot of blood swear and tears in this career move. And after my last ordeal I'm very nervous about going back out.. I'm not a complainer I don't like to talk crap about the co..because you guys taught that it's what I get out of it, I'm almost considering g going back I left on really good terms , just a little freaked out about the trainer.. I want to be good at my driving career because there's a lot more to it ..I have a learning g disability and that makes it a little rough I'm a hands on girl .. So to speak ... I don't want to be a job hopper but I would like a company who's training is very thorough ..maybe I'm expecting too much Any ideas and please try not to bash me to hard .

I not expecting a suite, it's rough out there and I admire the things truckers go through I'm tough as nails ..mentally, physically and emotionally.. Please help me Any words of wisdom..

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Deb R.'s Comment
member avatar
I put alot of blood swear and tears in this career move

Not sure if the "swear" instead of "sweat" was done on purpose, but sure makes sense!

As to your question, I'd say, don't be too quick to throw in the towel! Unfortunately, you had a crappy trainer, that's not your fault.

I have found this to be a challenging profession, with many "what the hell am I doing here?" moments. Many of the people and situations that totally freaked me out in the beginning, I now see differently. Stick with it.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Well I've been out of school since sept .. My first trainer experience was scary, maybe it was me, I'm starting g to second guessy self maybe I'm not good enough to be a trucker. I do know I put alot of blood swear and tears in this career move. And after my last ordeal I'm very nervous about going back out.. I'm not a complainer I don't like to talk crap about the co..because you guys taught that it's what I get out of it, I'm al.ost considering g going back I left on really good terms , just a little freaked out about the trainer.. I want to be good at my driving career because there's alot more to it ..I have a learning g disability and that makes it a little rough I'm a hands on girl .. So to speak ... I don't want to be a job hopper but I would like a co who's Trai ING is very thorough ..maybe I'm expecting to much Any ideas and please try not to bash me to hard .

I not expecting a suite, it's rough out there and I admire the things truckers go through I'm tough as nails ..mentally physical and emotionaly.. Please help me And words of wisdom..

You had a bad training experience, it happens all the time. Chalk it up as a learning experience you survived to tell about. There are good and bad trainers in every company. Fortunately I believe the good ones out number the bad. If at all possible complete the remainder of your training (Western Express?) as soon as you can. Everyday that passes since the last time you were driving, is a potential setback. It's highly unlikely you will get that trainer again. Otherwise, if you hire on with another carrier they may require you to take a refresher course and start fresh with a new trainer extending your training time and limiting your earning potential.

You managed to get this far in spite of your trainer, something positive as a take away. Take charge and keep moving forward.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Twisted sister 's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

Well I've been out of school since sept .. My first trainer experience was scary, maybe it was me, I'm starting g to second guessy self maybe I'm not good enough to be a trucker. I do know I put alot of blood swear and tears in this career move. And after my last ordeal I'm very nervous about going back out.. I'm not a complainer I don't like to talk crap about the co..because you guys taught that it's what I get out of it, I'm al.ost considering g going back I left on really good terms , just a little freaked out about the trainer.. I want to be good at my driving career because there's alot more to it ..I have a learning g disability and that makes it a little rough I'm a hands on girl .. So to speak ... I don't want to be a job hopper but I would like a co who's Trai ING is very thorough ..maybe I'm expecting to much Any ideas and please try not to bash me to hard .

I not expecting a suite, it's rough out there and I admire the things truckers go through I'm tough as nails ..mentally physical and emotionaly.. Please help me And words of wisdom..

double-quotes-end.png

You had a bad training experience, it happens all the time. Chalk it up as a learning experience you survived to tell about. There are good and bad trainers in every company. Fortunately I believe the good ones out number the bad. If at all possible complete the remainder of your training (Western Express?) as soon as you can. Everyday that passes since the last time you were driving, is a potential setback. It's highly unlikely you will get that trainer again. Otherwise, if you hire on with another carrier they may require you to take a refresher course and start fresh with a new trainer extending your training time and limiting your earning potential.

You managed to get this far in spite of your trainer, something positive as a take away. Take charge and keep moving forward.

Thank you for all your input, your right I've come this far why give up now called my recruiter, since I still don't have a dm.

Let you know my outcome

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Old School's Comment
member avatar

Hey Christine, here's the hard truth about training: What it amounts to is exposure. That is what the training is. They throw you in a truck with an experienced driver who can kind of hold your hand for a few days, and then it is usually full bore - let's get this load moving! It's kind of funny how this training stuff works. If you look at the folks who have a shorter training period - I'm thinking of Schneider, and Roehl off the top of my head - their programs are more actual training intensive, whereas most companies who put you with a trainer for four or five weeks are basically trying to expose you to what you will be doing so that you can get comfortable enough with it so that they can turn you loose in a truck of your own.

Here's the deal: None of us were really ready to be thrown out there into this job when the company decided it was time to hand us a set of keys. I was scared to death, but I was so glad to be away from the crazy trainer they put me with, I took my shot at it. Your time with a trainer is kind of like learning to ride a bicycle with training wheels - you need them there just to keep you from killing yourself. Once those training wheels are off you are still going to scrape your knees a few times, and it's going to be real uncomfortable for a while still. This is why you'll see us always encouraging folks to stick with their first truck driving job for a full year - that's what it takes to just start getting proficient at this job.

I don't know what you are planning on doing, but if you decide to move on to another company then don't waste your time, get right on it and strike while the iron is hot. You will only hurt your chances by sitting around licking your wounds. You can do this - I've got every confidence in you - but you've got to get right back on the horse that threw you and show them how tough you are.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Forest W.'s Comment
member avatar

I'm in the same spot as you. Only I let it go to far now my cdl is expired and I'm trying to pass my exam. Don't let it get this far.

I'm just going to say me personally, I'm extremely disappointed in myself. Hard even to look in the mirror. I had a chance for a career and I kind of messedit up. I had a trainer who was disturbed mentally and had bad anger problems. I understand how hard it is to fire a ****ty trainer. I almost felt a bond to mine. Like a son to a abusive father would I guess. And it was hard to tell him to drop me off at the terminal. But you have to do what's best for you if you want to be happy.

Id say go for it. Worst thing that could happen is you get another bad trainer, just remember its only a month or two. If deep down you still want to drive,then do it. If you don't enjoy it, then find something else. But you sound passionate about trucks and a kind person and we need more truckers like that.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

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