Can I Be Accepted Into Paid For School With My Work History

Topic 11490 | Page 1

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Jay B.'s Comment
member avatar

I have been thinking seriously about getting into trucking. Been doing a lot of research on this site and others (thanks to those who have contributed, great work) and the lifestyle seems to fit my personality and goals perfectly.

I would really like to attend a paid for training program like the ones offered by Prime and CRST. In my research on what it takes to get into one of these programs (and trucking in general) one thing that keeps coming up is that you have to have a solid work history. This is one thing that concerns me.

I'm about to be 30, a child of the recession without a college degree and I have scrapped my way through most of my adult life working odd jobs. I haven't been an official employee on the books anywhere since high school, except for a few months each at a few places. I have not filed taxes in the last seven years as I've never made enough money on the books. There is no verifiable record of most of my work history.

Last year I went through a serious medical issue and had to leave the city I had been in for 10 years to come live with my folks. I was physically and mentally shot and a lot of people thought my life was basically over. I was one of them.

Then one day I decided that wasn't going to happen and decided to get up and get a job, despite my folks' protests. Within a month I had landed a job in retail appliance sales mainly based on my persistence and a great interview. I thought the job would be great, and for a while it was.

Then I got fired over ridiculous retail politics in the store. I was disgusted by what happened (long story) and went back to working odd jobs to avoid corporate BS. Work started getting slow and due to family drama I decided to find a new "regular" job and move out of my folks place. I went back to work at a phone sales job in a different town that I had worked at for a short time in 2011. Well, I got fired from there too, this time because I got sick with a flu that was going around and my supervisor told me she would get the time off cleared and then didn't. Funny enough they called me to rehire me about a week later and I am actually thinking of going back just to have a job and be able to get out of my folks place again.

To be more specific: In the last two years I have worked two jobs on the books. The first I worked for about three months, from August to October of 2014. The second I worked for three-four months, July to October of 2015. I was fired from both. The second has offered to rehire me. I have never been on unemployment or collected government benefits. I am a hardworking guy who has managed to survive tough times by hustling constantly.

My questions are: is there any chance to get into one of the paid for training programs with this work history? Should I go back to the more recent job to show some stability? If so how long should I work there before trying to be accepted for a training program?

If you have any insight into what these companies want as far as work history, or any advice for me on how to proceed and build an acceptable work history, I will be very grateful. Trucking looks like a dream job for me and I really want to be able to build a future for myself and my girlfriend.

Thanks in advance

-J

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Jay, driving an OTR truck is not as easy as phone sales. You work long hours - even at any time of the day or night, are away from home weeks at a time, including weekends.

Yes, it's great to have a front row seat to See America, but it's not as cushy as selling appliances all day long.

Read Brett's Book and find out about a Truck Driver's Career.

If you think you're up for this, come on back!

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Jay B.'s Comment
member avatar

Thanks Errol. Actually I have already done a ton of research on trucking, reading many pages of threads on this forum and tons of articles here and on other sites. I have not had a chance to read Brett's book yet but I plan to over the weekend, and I have read tons of stories about the highs and lows of trucking. Everything I have read plus my love of driving long trips makes me sure I would love the lifestyle.

I know that the jobs I mentioned are cushy, don't take those as an indication of my personality though. The unverifiable work I've done, which is most of my life, was mostly in construction and demolition, often in some pretty rough conditions. Blazing heat, freezing cold, ankle deep in dog doo in the pouring rain, I've lived most of my life off rough work.

I'm more looking for answers related to my work history issues, but I appreciate the cautionary reply.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Doug 's Comment
member avatar

Jay,

No offense, but, you wont have much luck getting a job at Walmart or a fast food place with your lack of verifiable employment since high school and being terminated from 2 jobs that can verify your employment.

Im not saying you are a shady person because I dont know you. However, on paper, you will be looked at as exactly that. Remember, you will be asking someone to trust you with hundreds of thousands of dollars worth of goods and equipment. Based on what you have said, thats not very realistic to ask.

Jay B.'s Comment
member avatar

Doug, thanks for the honest and straightforward reply. No offense taken. I figured it was a long shot, which is why I asked the other questions.

It seems I will need to go back to my most recent job and start building a more stable verifiable work history.

Any idea on how long it might take me, working steadily in a verifiable job, to have a shot at being accepted for a company-sponsored training program?

Company-sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

∆_Danielsahn_∆'s Comment
member avatar

I read somewhere, that if you can verify your under the table years with documentation from a coworker, employer, parents, or customer, that they will sometimes take that into consideration. I wish I could remember.

I will look for it, and get back to you asap.

Good luck

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

Jay B.'s Comment
member avatar

Daniel, that would be awesome. My folks can definitely confirm all the years I spent working under the table. I appreciate you looking for the details on that and will do some more searching myself. Thanks!

Sweet Potato's Comment
member avatar

There are a few companies out there that will work with you, You will just have to do the paperwork. Get a few notorized letters from people who knew what you were doing other than sitting back with a few beers on the sofa.. I had the same issue coming from being a stay at home mom and they worked with me.. And there were more willing to accept me and I had to make my own decision as to where to go.. I will list a few.. Swift, Celadon, Jim Palmer Trucking, Prime, and a brand new one XPO Logistics (the old Conway) infact I spoke with them more than once and wanted to go there but location was a factor they just opened up a new school which provides food, lodging and transportation at their cost.. If you have any questions or need advice hit me up on here or email monicabauer@frontier.com Good Luck!

Doug, thanks for the honest and straightforward reply. No offense taken. I figured it was a long shot, which is why I asked the other questions.

It seems I will need to go back to my most recent job and start building a more stable verifiable work history.

Any idea on how long it might take me, working steadily in a verifiable job, to have a shot at being accepted for a company-sponsored training program?

Company-sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

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