No Trainers..???? Need Help With This Please..

Topic 11491 | Page 1

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TreeTheTrucker's Comment
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Ok I'm done with orientation and my driver advocate says to me " we're sending you to Kernersville, North Carolina" my first thought was "huh???" She said we simply don't have trainers here, so we're sending you to kernersville to do local runs with a trainer there.(mind you I want over the road driving) So she tells me I'll do local runs there with him and at night the trainer parks the truck at bills truck stop and you'll sleep there in the truck(sleeper berth) every night for two weeks until we can find you an over the road trainer... Now my contract says I have to do 10,000miles before I go solo in my own truck. But doing local runs seems like it'll take me forever to get them 10,000 miles done. And a friend of mine just got off the truck with this guy and says he likes to do all the driving! In two weeks she only has 1,100 miles under her belt... I'm not digging this whole process at all. Now I understand I have to pay my dues in this industry but this sounds crazy. Has anyone ever heard of this or am I unreasonable in my thinking?

Over The Road:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Sleeper Berth:

The portion of the tractor behind the seats which acts as the "living space" for the driver. It generally contains a bed (or bunk beds), cabinets, lights, temperature control knobs, and 12 volt plugs for power.

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Double check about that two week assignment. Maybe if they find a trainer sooner then you will be OTR sooner than you think. But I do know they would rather have you driving with somebody instead of sitting around all day. Check on that two week thing - it may not be as bad as you think. Math question: Which is greater: miles driving locally or miles sitting in a hotel room?

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Second Chance's Comment
member avatar

Sounds like the trainer is trying to keep you as long as they can to make more money. I could be wrong.

TreeTheTrucker's Comment
member avatar

@errol I triple checked! They said they're sending me there because they can't find anyone to do over the road training. So with that said, what makes me think they'll have a OTR trainer in two weeks? And I wouldn't be sitting in a hotel room(I wish), I have to sleep in the sleeper berth at the truck stop.

@second chance I swear I thought that exact thing!!!

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Over The Road:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Sleeper Berth:

The portion of the tractor behind the seats which acts as the "living space" for the driver. It generally contains a bed (or bunk beds), cabinets, lights, temperature control knobs, and 12 volt plugs for power.

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Sounds like the trainer is trying to keep you as long as they can to make more money. I could be wrong.

Travelyon doesn't have a trainer. No trainer making money. Travelyon's not getting miles aka not paid. The company doesn't get anything out of this.

Doug 's Comment
member avatar

And I wouldn't be sitting in a hotel room(I wish), I have to sleep in the sleeper berth at the truck stop.

Where do you think you will be sleeping OTR ?

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Sleeper Berth:

The portion of the tractor behind the seats which acts as the "living space" for the driver. It generally contains a bed (or bunk beds), cabinets, lights, temperature control knobs, and 12 volt plugs for power.

TreeTheTrucker's Comment
member avatar

@doug

I can understand that but i wouldn't be sleeping there every night. With an OTR trainer, we'd be constantly moving(and making money in the process). I can't drive the truck, and there's nothing around me. But the question I proposed is has anyone heard of trainees being bused to another location under these circumstances. Or am I unreasonable in my thinking. I appreciate your response though.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

You (or, basically CDL students) get bused to where the company needs you to be. Yes your situation is unfortunate for now, but I do believe they want to get you doing something until they can get you a regular qualified trainer. So in the meantime there is a trainer in Kernersville, who can start training you until your regular full-time trainer is available.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
The Persian Conversion's Comment
member avatar

Honestly, I would advise you to just be patient and do what they ask. If you show even a hint of attitude at this stage, it will do nothing but hurt you. However, if you cheerfully go along with it (you don't actually have to be cheerful, just make them think you are), that can do nothing but help you.

You have to think about the big picture. You know they want you OTR eventually, it makes them more money than having you train with a local guy. So just have some faith that they are doing their best and not trying to intentionally screw you over. Just grin and bear it. Besides, 2 weeks is NOTHING man! It will be over before you know it. The only thing that matters at this stage is how you choose to react to this minor setback, because that will go a long way in determining how you'll react to the inevitable problems and setbacks when you're solo.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

TreeTheTrucker's Comment
member avatar

@the Persian conversion Solid!!! I haven't shown them a hint of displeasure but I haven't shown them I'm pleased about it either,lol. But I was going to go through with it anyway because I made this decision and chalked it up to "paying dues". So I completely dig what your saying, just wanted to know if this was new or has it been before(busing trainees to another state to do local runs before getting with an OTR trainer) but I'm up for the task, just thought it sounded odd.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

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