Western Express

Topic 11970 | Page 1

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C T.'s Comment
member avatar

Hey guys, gotta question for ya. I start school in January and have been looking into a lot of companies to apply to for pre hire. I've seen a large amount of Western ads being posted. Wondering if they are a decent place to start? I've heard the usual bashing about them as a starter company, however I believe Old School did well there? I know reviews online aren't worth much but I'd like some honest opinions.

Pre Hire:

What Exactly Is A Pre-Hire Letter?

Pre-hire letters are acceptance letters from trucking companies to students, or even potential students, to verify placement. The trucking companies are saying in writing that the student, or potential student, appears to meet the company's minimum hiring requirements and is welcome to attend their orientation at the company’s expense once he or she graduates from truck driving school and has their CDL in hand.

We have an excellent article that will help you Understand The Pre-Hire Process.

A Pre-Hire Letter Is Not A Guarantee Of Employment

The people that receive a pre-hire letter are people who meet the company's minimum hiring requirements, but it is not an employment contract. It is an invitation to orientation, and the orientation itself is a prerequisite to employment.

During the orientation you will get a physical, drug screen, and background check done. These and other qualifications must be met before someone in orientation is officially hired.

Old School's Comment
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C T, The thing about choosing that first company is that you want to choose a company that has some of the things you are looking for in your job. Let's just say that you have a need to be home every two weeks for some reason. I actually had someone send me an e-mail the other day with this very scenario, and they were wanting to start at Western Express. I advised them against Western because they are going to want you to stay out on the road longer than that. It's not that they are cruel and don't want people to have home time, it is just that their over the road program and freight logistics model just works better if you stay on the road for at least four weeks at a time. Once you start breaking it up with more frequent home time your pay check will suffer because they have to work you back into their system.

I did very well at Western Express, and I am glad to be able to share with people the truth that you can be successful at some of these companies that are berated and slandered on the internet. Western Express has been working hard to improve their image and increase their driver retention, but as far as I know you still need to be a runner who doesn't mind staying out on the road for weeks at a time to be successful.

Over The Road:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

C T.'s Comment
member avatar

Thank you old school for the reply. If I were a single guy I'd stay on the road for years but everything's different now. I'm also interested in roehl as they seem to have decent home time. I understand I won't make as much coming home on weekends or more but I really want to pay my dues and get my year or two experience. Westerns ads are looking more and more convincing however.

Tim F.'s Comment
member avatar

CT...just finished up my first year with Roehl. I get home for my reset once a week. I am on a dedicated account. But Roehl offers several options for their fleet. I've done very very well my first year driving. I would not assume because your home weekly, you make less money. Depending on where you live, one of these options could be a perfect fit for you. Good luck!

C T.'s Comment
member avatar

Hi Tim. I spoke with a recruiter from roehl and she said I would have to do otr for a bit before moving to another fleet. Did you have to do otr and if so how long? I was initially interested in their 7/3 option as long as I can at least match my income as a line cook I'd be happy for a little while. By the way, not sure if all northern folks have that accent she had but it was awesome.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Tim F.'s Comment
member avatar

Hi Tim. I spoke with a recruiter from roehl and she said I would have to do otr for a bit before moving to another fleet. Did you have to do otr and if so how long? I was initially interested in their 7/3 option as long as I can at least match my income as a line cook I'd be happy for a little while. By the way, not sure if all northern folks have that accent she had but it was awesome.

CT....when I signed up for the CDL school I requested the Dedicated fleet. My recruiter, Kim Calhoun, checked with management and said it was available. So I went to their school...out with a trainer and then into my own truck on the dedicated account. Could it be the "out for a bit" might be with a trainer for a couple weeks? I know there were three people from my class going to the same dedicated account as I was, so it really wasn't something special done for me. i m not sure about the accent thing...I do know it's fun for me to travel down south and hear the southern accent....so maybe there's something there...lol...I will say that the people At Roehl are top notch straight shooters....I don't think the Roehl family would have it any other way. Good luck...hope you choose the Power of Red!!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Tim F.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

Hi Tim. I spoke with a recruiter from roehl and she said I would have to do otr for a bit before moving to another fleet. Did you have to do otr and if so how long? I was initially interested in their 7/3 option as long as I can at least match my income as a line cook I'd be happy for a little while. By the way, not sure if all northern folks have that accent she had but it was awesome.

double-quotes-end.png

CT....when I signed up for the CDL school I requested the Dedicated fleet. My recruiter, Kim Calhoun, checked with management and said it was available. So I went to their school...out with a trainer and then into my own truck on the dedicated account. Could it be the "out for a bit" might be with a trainer for a couple weeks? I know there were three people from my class going to the same dedicated account as I was, so it really wasn't something special done for me. i m not sure about the accent thing...I do know it's fun for me to travel down south and hear the southern accent....so maybe there's something there...lol...I will say that the people At Roehl are top notch straight shooters....I don't think the Roehl family would have it any other way. Good luck...hope you choose the Power of Red!!

CT....I don't know what a typical line cook makes so I can't comment. I will only say this. I am very very happy with what I made with Roehl during 2015.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

C T.'s Comment
member avatar

Thanks for the replies guys. As I line cook I pull about 30k. Not much but for alleasy work its not bad. I would like to match that at minimum shouldn't have a problem even with slip seating. Anyway you could give me a ball park of your earnings first year? I don't like to get into people's business but I am curious. Also where are you located? I am in Georgia and was told they have freight coming this way.

Tim F.'s Comment
member avatar

Thanks for the replies guys. As I line cook I pull about 30k. Not much but for alleasy work its not bad. I would like to match that at minimum shouldn't have a problem even with slip seating. Anyway you could give me a ball park of your earnings first year? I don't like to get into people's business but I am curious. Also where are you located? I am in Georgia and was told they have freight coming this way.

CT still not comfortable talking about it. i will say this...I don't think 40-45k is an unrealistic expectation. it did take me a little while to figure out how to run my hours efficiently. So that I could be as productive as possible for Roehl as well as my wallet. Because I know there is always a reset at the end of the week, I run as hard as I can AND as hard as theY send me. I live just south of Albany NY but run out of Winchester Va. Roehl has a terminal located on the outskirts of Atlanta (Conley)so I hope the have freight going to Georgia. I know I have been to Georgia quite a few times. I hope that salary expectation works...I won't quote my specific only out of respect for other drivers. Thanks

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

ATXJEHU's Comment
member avatar

Thanks for the replies guys. As I line cook I pull about 30k. Not much but for alleasy work its not bad. I would like to match that at minimum shouldn't have a problem even with slip seating. Anyway you could give me a ball park of your earnings first year? I don't like to get into people's business but I am curious. Also where are you located? I am in Georgia and was told they have freight coming this way.

I had my CDLA in hand prior to going with Roehl as a rookie driver and stayed there 15 months. You should have no problem exceeding $30K with them in your first year working full-time (their 7 on 7 off hometime is really a part-time job). Also, their Regional gigs tend to be lower mileage runs. If you get a dedicated route , you will know what to expect. However, in my experience, the OTR runs will earn you the most. One OTR driver who started with them when I did racked up 140,000 miles his first year with Roehl grossing well over $50K. So, much depends upon you and the choices you make. Roehl seems to have the freight and they treated me well (yes, there were plenty of frustrating times, but that will be true wherever you are as a driver). Their systems are proven and I never had a problem with payroll, etc. Good luck to ya!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Dedicated Route:

A driver or carrier who transports cargo between regular, prescribed routes. Normally it means a driver will be dedicated to working for one particular customer like Walmart or Home Depot and they will only haul freight for that customer. You'll often hear drivers say something like, "I'm on the Walmart dedicated account."

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

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