Trying To Obtain Information For Husband

Topic 11995 | Page 1

Page 1 of 2 Next Page Go To Page:
Tina F.'s Comment
member avatar

Hello! My husband got his CDL A over a year ago and has been working OTR , I am trying to help him find something local but wanted more information on load pay vs. for hire pay vs. pay per miles in the Midwest region. It would be much appreciated if anyone could provide me with some realistic dollar amounts, he wants to make a move sooner thank later. Thanks!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Jetguy's Comment
member avatar

Pay? In my research, with Schneider, on their website, I found:

"Up to $58,000 per year. Regional truck drivers earn up to $0.41 per mile* starting pay, have a predictable work schedule and get home weekly in this CDL driving job."

You can input your zip code and find what jobs Schneider has in your area. The following is St Louis Mo area:

http://schneiderjobs.com/search-driving-opportunities/details/1200000054

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Turbo Dan's Comment
member avatar

You could search Craigs List, Transportation, Your location, to see what Local Jobs are being offered daily in your area. They will spell out their requirements, Pay ect.

Dan B.'s Comment
member avatar

Hello! My husband got his CDL A over a year ago and has been working OTR , I am trying to help him find something local but wanted more information on load pay vs. for hire pay vs. pay per miles in the Midwest region. It would be much appreciated if anyone could provide me with some realistic dollar amounts, he wants to make a move sooner thank later. Thanks!

Tina, I'm still wading through a lot of the 'pay' info myself to find factual information, but I did want to pass something on;

Schneider has a terminal close to me and in searching through their website for jobs, I noticed they have a lot of places where you can go talk to a recruiter. I'm not sure if they are honest or just tell you that you can "make up to" whatever, but I'm going to give it a shot.

http://schneiderjobs.com/company-drivers/recruiting-events

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

∆_Danielsahn_∆'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

Hello! My husband got his CDL A over a year ago and has been working OTR , I am trying to help him find something local but wanted more information on load pay vs. for hire pay vs. pay per miles in the Midwest region. It would be much appreciated if anyone could provide me with some realistic dollar amounts, he wants to make a move sooner thank later. Thanks!

double-quotes-end.png

Tina, I'm still wading through a lot of the 'pay' info myself to find factual information, but I did want to pass something on;

Schneider has a terminal close to me and in searching through their website for jobs, I noticed they have a lot of places where you can go talk to a recruiter. I'm not sure if they are honest or just tell you that you can "make up to" whatever, but I'm going to give it a shot.

http://schneiderjobs.com/company-drivers/recruiting-events

Why do people always think that a recruiter is trying to pull a fast one on a person? Schneider is very reputable. If it is in writing, especially on their specific job descriptions, you can take out to the bank.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

Dan B.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

Hello! My husband got his CDL A over a year ago and has been working OTR , I am trying to help him find something local but wanted more information on load pay vs. for hire pay vs. pay per miles in the Midwest region. It would be much appreciated if anyone could provide me with some realistic dollar amounts, he wants to make a move sooner thank later. Thanks!

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

Tina, I'm still wading through a lot of the 'pay' info myself to find factual information, but I did want to pass something on;

Schneider has a terminal close to me and in searching through their website for jobs, I noticed they have a lot of places where you can go talk to a recruiter. I'm not sure if they are honest or just tell you that you can "make up to" whatever, but I'm going to give it a shot.

http://schneiderjobs.com/company-drivers/recruiting-events

double-quotes-end.png

Why do people always think that a recruiter is trying to pull a fast one on a person? Schneider is very reputable. If it is in writing, especially on their specific job descriptions, you can take out to the bank.

Because I see so much deception and dishonesty coming from the industry. I think the exceptionally high turnover rate indicates something is seriously wrong in the industry.

I’ve done a fair amount of research into jobs in my area and Schneider rates pretty highly IMHO, but their ads are still deceptive. As an example, they have a local dedicated driver job listed at ‘up to $65,000 a year’. I found 2 other drivers that worked for Schneider at that facility and in that capacity and their pay was $40k to $45 a year running hard. One also said he had issue between the home time the recruiter told him he would have, and what he eventually got.

I am still considering driving as a career but I have taken one step back from it. I see possibilities in it both from a financial and schedule perspective, but I’m not going to wade through too much BS to get there.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

∆_Danielsahn_∆'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

Hello! My husband got his CDL A over a year ago and has been working OTR , I am trying to help him find something local but wanted more information on load pay vs. for hire pay vs. pay per miles in the Midwest region. It would be much appreciated if anyone could provide me with some realistic dollar amounts, he wants to make a move sooner thank later. Thanks!

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

Tina, I'm still wading through a lot of the 'pay' info myself to find factual information, but I did want to pass something on;

Schneider has a terminal close to me and in searching through their website for jobs, I noticed they have a lot of places where you can go talk to a recruiter. I'm not sure if they are honest or just tell you that you can "make up to" whatever, but I'm going to give it a shot.

http://schneiderjobs.com/company-drivers/recruiting-events

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

Why do people always think that a recruiter is trying to pull a fast one on a person? Schneider is very reputable. If it is in writing, especially on their specific job descriptions, you can take out to the bank.

double-quotes-end.png

Because I see so much deception and dishonesty coming from the industry. I think the exceptionally high turnover rate indicates something is seriously wrong in the industry.

I’ve done a fair amount of research into jobs in my area and Schneider rates pretty highly IMHO, but their ads are still deceptive. As an example, they have a local dedicated driver job listed at ‘up to $65,000 a year’. I found 2 other drivers that worked for Schneider at that facility and in that capacity and their pay was $40k to $45 a year running hard. One also said he had issue between the home time the recruiter told him he would have, and what he eventually got.

I am still considering driving as a career but I have taken one step back from it. I see possibilities in it both from a financial and schedule perspective, but I’m not going to wade through too much BS to get there.

Nothing deceptive about that at all. Most of the Schneider drivers I have spoken with, love out, and a few even exceeded the "up to $xx,xxx per year. Hometime can be bumpy sometimes, that is s just the nature of the industry. Remember, there are always 2 sides to a story. Also, if you are already jaded before you even start, every little insignificant thing will nock you off your square. Keep an open mind, hang around this site for a while, and you will see what takes to make it in this industry.

Stay safe.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

Jetguy's Comment
member avatar

It's hard to not get jaded. Always something happens. But if one does the best he can, with a good attitude, then things will work out.

D_sahn- You get an A for the following response:

D_sahn wrote: Nothing deceptive about that at all. Most of the Schneider drivers I have spoken with, love out, and a few even exceeded the "up to $xx,xxx per year. Hometime can be bumpy sometimes, that is s just the nature of the industry. Remember, there are always 2 sides to a story. Also, if you are already jaded before you even start, every little insignificant thing will nock you off your square. Keep an open mind, hang around this site for a while, and you will see what takes to make it in this industry.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

David's Comment
member avatar

What is your husband wanting to do? does he want to be home nightly with his family, or does he want to stay out for a few days and come back for a few days?

I would highly recomemend he get his Hazmat if he doesnt already have it.. Hazmat will open a lot of doors and make it easier to land something with nightly home time... There are quite a few LTL/P&D (Less Than Truckload/Pickup & Delivery) companies out there, such as Fed-Ex, UPS, Old Dominion, Saia, Conway... All of which require Hazmat.

Being an OTR driver, it'll be hard to get the hazmat, as he'll need to set up a time to A) go get finger printed and pay the $90 fee, B) Goto DMV and take the Hazmat test.. He'll also need to use any downtime to study the hazmat portion of the CDL manual or work on theHigh Road Training Program here.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

P&D:

Pickup & Delivery

Local drivers that stay around their area, usually within 100 mile radius of a terminal, picking up and delivering loads.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers for instance will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

P & D:

Pickup & Delivery

Local drivers that stay around their area, usually within 100 mile radius of a terminal, picking up and delivering loads.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers for instance will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DMV:

Department of Motor Vehicles, Bureau of Motor Vehicles

The state agency that handles everything related to your driver's licences, including testing, issuance, transfers, and revocation.

Phil C.'s Comment
member avatar

You can make around 40k a year as a local belly dump driver or dump truck driver in most areas, check with your local gravel or road construction or excavating companies to find out, that's at about $18/hour plus some overtime, which is pretty typical for the construction industry. You can make more the longer youre with a company but expect to start between 16 and 18 an hour.

Page 1 of 2 Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More