When You Go Out With Your Trainer (sleeping Situation)

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Newbie78inpa J.'s Comment
member avatar

How does the sleeping situation work when you go out with your 4+ weeks OTR with a trainer?

The trucks have bunk beds but i read nobody is allowed to sleep in the top bunk when the truck is in motion. Then i read one person sleeps while the other person drives? How will i learn that way if i'm sleeping when he is driving and vice versa? And then that means we would be using the same bottom bunk?

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Tyler Durden's Comment
member avatar

How does the sleeping situation work when you go out with your 4+ weeks OTR with a trainer?

The trucks have bunk beds but i read nobody is allowed to sleep in the top bunk when the truck is in motion. Then i read one person sleeps while the other person drives? How will i learn that way if i'm sleeping when he is driving and vice versa? And then that means we would be using the same bottom bunk?

From my understanding the company I am going with is we both sleep at the same time. Separate beds of course 😉

I know each company is different so it is best to discuss it with them on there policy.

Just another reason I chose the one I did. Prefer the fact that when I am driving I know my trainer is right there awake helping me if need be

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Newbie78inpa J.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

How does the sleeping situation work when you go out with your 4+ weeks OTR with a trainer?

The trucks have bunk beds but i read nobody is allowed to sleep in the top bunk when the truck is in motion. Then i read one person sleeps while the other person drives? How will i learn that way if i'm sleeping when he is driving and vice versa? And then that means we would be using the same bottom bunk?

double-quotes-end.png

From my understanding the company I am going with is we both sleep at the same time. Separate beds of course 😉

I know each company is different so it is best to discuss it with them on there policy.

Just another reason I chose the one I did. Prefer the fact that when I am driving I know my trainer is right there awake helping me if need be

Yeah that and i don't want to sleep in a bed used by another dude! That's why i'm confused since you aren't allowed to use the top bunk while anyone is driving. So that means you would use the bottom bunk that he slept in before you? no way. If that's the case i will sleep in the passenger seat.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
C. S.'s Comment
member avatar

Many companies have policies forbidding the use of the top bunk while the vehicle is moving. You are more likely to be seriously injured or killed in the top bunk in an accident.

During the first part of your training your trainer will be in the passenger seat to help you whenever you're driving. The amount of time this lasts will vary by company. Then you will begin team driving. Some companies have the trainer in the passenger seat during the entire training period.

And yes, you will most likely share the bottom bunk. You'll switch bedding each shift. A sleeping bag is the easiest way to accomplish this.

Tyler Durden's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

How does the sleeping situation work when you go out with your 4+ weeks OTR with a trainer?

The trucks have bunk beds but i read nobody is allowed to sleep in the top bunk when the truck is in motion. Then i read one person sleeps while the other person drives? How will i learn that way if i'm sleeping when he is driving and vice versa? And then that means we would be using the same bottom bunk?

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

From my understanding the company I am going with is we both sleep at the same time. Separate beds of course 😉

I know each company is different so it is best to discuss it with them on there policy.

Just another reason I chose the one I did. Prefer the fact that when I am driving I know my trainer is right there awake helping me if need be

double-quotes-end.png

Yeah that and i don't want to sleep in a bed used by another dude! That's why i'm confused since you aren't allowed to use the top bunk while anyone is driving. So that means you would use the bottom bunk that he slept in before you? no way. If that's the case i will sleep in the passenger seat.

No..... For me that means when I am done driving the wheels stop and we both sleep. I in top bunk him or her in their bed. My trainer will be driving the first day and that's it. The rest is all me and he or her stays in the passenger seat.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Old School's Comment
member avatar

Sleeping in the passenger seat will get you a logs violation ticket.

The way I teach people to do this is to bring a sleeping bag with you. When it's your time to sleep you simply lay your sleeping bag on top of the other person's bedding and toss their pillow up onto your bunk (or the passenger seat), and then lay on top of your sleeping bag with a loose sheet over the top of you and your own pillow under your head. This way you're not on their sheets and you're using your own pillow.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Bud A.'s Comment
member avatar

How does the sleeping situation work when you go out with your 4+ weeks OTR with a trainer?

The trucks have bunk beds but i read nobody is allowed to sleep in the top bunk when the truck is in motion. Then i read one person sleeps while the other person drives? How will i learn that way if i'm sleeping when he is driving and vice versa? And then that means we would be using the same bottom bunk?

It depends on how that company's training goes. If you are training those 4+ weeks to get your CDL (i.e., you are driving on a permit), your trainer will be awake and in the jump seat with you the whole time. The truck will stop and you will both take a 10-hour break. If you have your CDL and are driving team, your trainer will sleep in the bottom bunk while you drive. You will sleep in the bottom bunk while he drives, but most likely he will have you put a sleeping bag over his bedding while you're sleeping there so you don't have to share cooties.

As far as learning anything, if you have your CDL, you are qualified to drive a truck. Does that mean you know how to go down a steep mountain grade with a heavy load? Probably not. Your trainer will know it's coming up, and should tell you to wake him up before you get there so he can talk you through it. If your trainer does what he should, he will get up when you arrive at shippers and receivers and teach you how to handle that part of the job. Likewise, if you're in the bunk when he's driving and gets to a shipper or receiver, you will get up and learn all about it. And if you're driving and your trainer is in the bunk and you need help (for instance, it starts snowing), your trainer should be willing to wake up and help you at a moment's notice, regardless of how long he's been in the bunk.

This is exactly why trainers and trainees are usually tired and cranky.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

C. S.'s Comment
member avatar
Yeah that and i don't want to sleep in a bed used by another dude!

If you've ever stayed in a hotel you have already done this. Use your own bedding and it is no less hygienic than a hotel bed.

If that's the case i will sleep in the passenger seat.

A dangerous habit to get into, and illegal besides. You're only allowed two hours off duty (before or after an eight hour sleeper period) in the passenger seat when the truck is moving, then you must log on duty. Do not allow yourself to to sleep in the passenger seat. If you can fall asleep there, you can fall asleep in the driver's seat.

Kieran L.'s Comment
member avatar

C.S. is right. Once you have your CDL , you'll almost certainly be running as a team with your trainer. You're just going to have to get over your fear of cooties and hot-swap the bottom bunk (with your own bedding of course). There are many situations that require sleeping in places others sleep as well, not only hotels but anytime you're staying at a friend's house, or if you're in any branch of the military chances are good that you'll sleep somewhere that someone else has slept many times. Its not a big deal as long as you've got your own pillow. Its just a soft spot to catch some Z's before your next shift after all.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Infidel's Comment
member avatar

I did teams with my trainer from day 1. And I was told we would not be teaming. So if you don't want too, make sure they are very clear about it. It was gross but my case was extreme. I have to go with a trainer again and I won't hire on with a company that does teams as part of training. Just my personal preference.

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