Considering Trucking, Live In Indiana Want To Start Career In Another State

Topic 12595 | Page 1

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Mark C.'s Comment
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Hello and thank you in advance for any help able to provide. Got out of army in 2011. Was over in Philippines for couple years. Residency is still Indiana. But, nothing is holding me down to being here. Would rather be down south or in state of Washington, where I was stationed. So, is it possible to hire on with a company that offers free training with agreement to work for that company for a certain amount of time, in a state other than where I have current residency? I tried to research online. But somehow, I must not be wording the question correctly. Because, I find everything but what I am looking for.

Errol V.'s Comment
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Hello and thank you in advance for any help able to provide. Got out of army in 2011. Was over in Philippines for couple years. Residency is still Indiana. But, nothing is holding me down to being here. Would rather be down south or in state of Washington, where I was stationed. So, is it possible to hire on with a company that offers free training with agreement to work for that company for a certain amount of time, in a state other than where I have current residency? I tried to research online. But somehow, I must not be wording the question correctly. Because, I find everything but what I am looking for.

Welcome to Trucking Truth, Mark! I'll say you came to the right place! There's tons of stuff here that will get you into the job you want.

The only issue you will have about a state is the thing about your driver license - it needs to be the state of residence, which you can, uhhh, change?. National Trucking Companies will want you to have a "home terminal". Some companies hire from particular areas, and that is only because that's where their freight goes. (Living in Florida and driving for "Rocky Mountain Cartage" may be a problem.)

That was the link for Companies. You can also get help on How To Choose A Company. There's important information here: Understanding Pre-Hires .

You asked about Company-Sponsored Training . That's the way I went, with Swift. Check out our list of Truck Driving Schools and How To Choose A School.

Get started with the world famous, second to none, cheap at half the price High Road Training Program to ace your CDL written tests.

A few more things: If you want, check out the Truck Driver's Career Guide and the Trucking Truth Best Seller, Brett's Book.

Reading through the forums, you'll find people who basically lived in their truck the whole time. A great thing for that is you can set your "home time" (time off) almost wherever you want, and get a closer look at the US of A.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Pre-hire:

What Exactly Is A Pre-Hire Letter?

Pre-hire letters are acceptance letters from trucking companies to students, or even potential students, to verify placement. The trucking companies are saying in writing that the student, or potential student, appears to meet the company's minimum hiring requirements and is welcome to attend their orientation at the company’s expense once he or she graduates from truck driving school and has their CDL in hand.

We have an excellent article that will help you Understand The Pre-Hire Process.

A Pre-Hire Letter Is Not A Guarantee Of Employment

The people that receive a pre-hire letter are people who meet the company's minimum hiring requirements, but it is not an employment contract. It is an invitation to orientation, and the orientation itself is a prerequisite to employment.

During the orientation you will get a physical, drug screen, and background check done. These and other qualifications must be met before someone in orientation is officially hired.

Pre-hires:

What Exactly Is A Pre-Hire Letter?

Pre-hire letters are acceptance letters from trucking companies to students, or even potential students, to verify placement. The trucking companies are saying in writing that the student, or potential student, appears to meet the company's minimum hiring requirements and is welcome to attend their orientation at the company’s expense once he or she graduates from truck driving school and has their CDL in hand.

We have an excellent article that will help you Understand The Pre-Hire Process.

A Pre-Hire Letter Is Not A Guarantee Of Employment

The people that receive a pre-hire letter are people who meet the company's minimum hiring requirements, but it is not an employment contract. It is an invitation to orientation, and the orientation itself is a prerequisite to employment.

During the orientation you will get a physical, drug screen, and background check done. These and other qualifications must be met before someone in orientation is officially hired.

Company-sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Old School's Comment
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Mark, I've never worked for a company in my state of residency. In fact they have been thousands of miles away. The way you get to go home is just put in a request for some home time, and they will find you a load that goes to your state, and hopefully near your home. You will then take the truck home, park it at your house or a nearby truck stop or Wal-mart - anything like that will work.

When looking at a trucking company's web site take a look at the area on their site that shows the hiring area. If the state you live in or want to live in is in their hiring area then that means they will hire you from that state, even if their headquarters is many states away. When you go to orientation with the company they will pay your way to get there - usually a bus fare.

Mark C.'s Comment
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So, thank you. You provided a lot of helpful information. And, I don't want to appear redundant. But, let me make sure I understand correctly. Though I have an Indiana licence, I can change that by just having an application accepted by a trucking company in the area I desire to be in. Having them relocate me, not my stuff, because that can all be sold. Upon going to that state, then I get a new state licence. They will not exclude me from hire just because I do not already live in that state... I do not need to move to that state 1st to change state residency prior to being available for hire in a different state... I am able to do either way. But, a company willing to bring me from Indiana to a different area, for training and employment, would be much easier route to take... I know in looking into all this, there is a lot more I want to consider, regarding what company to work for, the training involved, etc. And, I appreciate all the advice you have already given, and any more I can get from experienced truckers, like yourselves.

Mark C.'s Comment
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Starting off, living in my truck would be ideal. I have a small Rat Terrier. I will have to find a company hopefully willing to accept. I know during training will need to find family/friend to take care of. But, then will have flown to me. And, he will be my companion for living in a truck.

Mark C.'s Comment
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Also, returning to Indiana for a year or 2 is not a big concern. I was in the army at Ft Lewis for 4 years. I came back to Indiana maybe once or twice a year. I am ok with that. So, now I will consider which area of the US I really prefer, and look up trucking companies in that area. I would like to get going in about a month from now.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

Mark C.'s Comment
member avatar

So, thank you. You provided a lot of helpful information. And, I don't want to appear redundant. But, let me make sure I understand correctly. Though I have an Indiana licence, I can change that by just having an application accepted by a trucking company in the area I desire to be in. Having them relocate me, not my stuff, because that can all be sold. Upon going to that state, then I get a new state licence. They will not exclude me from hire just because I do not already live in that state... I do not need to move to that state 1st to change state residency prior to being available for hire in a different state... I am able to do either way. But, a company willing to bring me from Indiana to a different area, for training and employment, would be much easier route to take... I know in looking into all this, there is a lot more I want to consider, regarding what company to work for, the training involved, etc. And, I appreciate all the advice you have already given, and any more I can get from experienced truckers, like yourselves.

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Mark, in your last comment you said twice something like "the company will move me". Keep this in mind: no company will provide a nickel for you to move from one place to another, if residence address is important to them.

You need to provide a residence address to your company before they will hire you, if residence location is important to them. They won't accept a promised relocation on your part.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

Rick S.'s Comment
member avatar

You need to provide a residence address to your company before they will hire you, if residence location is important to them. They won't accept a promised relocation on your part.

To tag onto to this...

Your state of licensure at the time of application - is considered your "residence" for hiring purposes. Where you "plan on being in the future", is immaterial at the time of application. BUT - you might want to consider where you want to be IN THE FUTURE, with regards to whether the company you're planning on working for HIRES IN THAT AREA.

For example: I live in Fort Lauderdale - and next-to-NO-ONE hires out of this area (Werner, CRST, Armellini - being amongst the few). From an address north of I-4 (or better yet, north of the Florida Turnpike) ANYONE HIRES.

But - the address ON YOUR LICENSE has to be in the hiring area.

This brings some interesting rubs to folks that plan on being out "full time" (as in, not maintaining a residence).

In order to obtain a license in a NEW STATE - you need to be able to PROVE AN ADDRESS.

In my case - I have a few friends in Ga. (Atlanta area) that I could "use as an address" (by having bank account statements and other bills mailed there). But, unlike Florida - Georgia has a lot more INCOME TAX IMPLICATIONS than Florida (which has none currently). I loathe to consider paying an additional 15-20% of my income in taxes - to a place I actually DO NOT RESIDE.

So there are a number of issues to consider, as far as licensure state - before you start applying.

Rick

Mark C.'s Comment
member avatar

Okay, so once again, I thank you all for helping me through this. I really mean it. And once again, sorry it is taking me awhile to catch on. But, I think I got it. If I want to work in a different state, move to that state, get a driver's license in that state, then apply for trucking jobs in that area.... I cannot (cannot is a most unusual conjunction of words) get a job in a state other than Indiana, because I am limited by the licence I currently have.... Well that is doable too. I can survive for a short while while I do relocation on my own... So, I will now consider where it is I want to be, locate there, and go from there... If I am still confused, please let me know.

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