What Defects Are Ok To Ignore?

Topic 12624 | Page 1

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Andy F.'s Comment
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What defects do you ignore? If you have one brake lining cracked is it ok to drive? I am looking to save my company money.

RebelliousVamp 's Comment
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Brake lining? As in brake drum lining? Should be no less than 1/4 inch thick. Or are you asking about the brake lines? Should have no chaffing...nevermind a crack. I wouldn't mess around with that.

Justin (Jakebrake)'s Comment
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Minor fuel leaks and oil drips I'll usually bring to my companies attention but will will still drive air lines and such I'll see if I can't fix it my self usually but if I can't it goes to the shop and breaks I don't mess around with those are must get fixed. Lights and such are a thing I will try to fix my self as well. But if I can't then it will go in basically I try fixing it if it's something I can do but don't take the risk of getting trouble over saving the company money it's your career in the end not theirs.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
C. S.'s Comment
member avatar

Be a cynic if you like. It's not about saving the company money. The truth is you will not make any money out here if you are going to refuse a trailer for any defects, or not drive and demand to be towed if the truck is having any issues. You will sit and sit, and when everything's been fixed the next load you get the trailer will have something else wrong with it, and the cycle will start again. Eventually your DM will get tired of it, and even when you've decided that you want to run and start making some money, your miles will suffer because you will be on THE LIST.

Ignorable defects are too innumerable to list, but here are a few as an example: ABS light on trailer malfunctioning, rust that doesn't affect roadworthiness of trailer, reflective tape peeling off, trailer skirt damaged, no way to secure landing gear handle (I use bungee cords), sandpads bent/cracked, tandem release worn/rusted/bent, etc. ad infinitum. Of course, there are many things that can be fixed by the driver before setting out. But some can't, and aren't worth bothering with. You'll learn as you encounter them.

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Andy F.'s Comment
member avatar

Brake lining? As in brake drum lining? Should be no less than 1/4 inch thick. Or are you asking about the brake lines? Should have no chaffing...nevermind a crack. I wouldn't mess around with that.

I was being sarcastic, I am just trying to point out to the super truckers that Illegal is Illegal, no matter how they rationalize it, if something is not legal to drive its your fault if you kill someone. Im curious what kind of defects these guys drive with.

Daniel's Comment
member avatar

Be a cynic if you like. It's not about saving the company money. The truth is you will not make any money out here if you are going to refuse a trailer for any defects, or not drive and demand to be towed if the truck is having any issues. You will sit and sit, and when everything's been fixed the next load you get the trailer will have something else wrong with it, and the cycle will start again. Eventually your DM will get tired of it, and even when you've decided that you want to run and start making some money, your miles will suffer because you will be on THE LIST.

Ignorable defects are too innumerable to list, but here are a few as an example: ABS light on trailer malfunctioning, rust that doesn't affect roadworthiness of trailer, reflective tape peeling off, trailer skirt damaged, no way to secure landing gear handle (I use bungee cords), sandpads bent/cracked, tandem release worn/rusted/bent, etc. ad infinitum. Of course, there are many things that can be fixed by the driver before setting out. But some can't, and aren't worth bothering with. You'll learn as you encounter them.

I second this. Pretty obvious.

ABS light on this trailer likes to flicker (loose pigtail). I used some cardboard in the last one as a wedge to cure it.

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Old School's Comment
member avatar
I am just trying to point out to the super truckers that Illegal is Illegal,

Andy, that is all fine and good, but you might have better success on a site where "super truckers" hang out. We don't have em in here.

Daniel's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

I am just trying to point out to the super truckers that Illegal is Illegal,

double-quotes-end.png

Andy, that is all fine and good, but you might have better success on a site where "super truckers" hang out. We don't have em in here.

My friend calls me that because I drive in snow through South Dakota. Lol

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
I was being sarcastic, I am just trying to point out to the super truckers that Illegal is Illegal, no matter how they rationalize it, if something is not legal to drive its your fault if you kill someone. Im curious what kind of defects these guys drive with.

We don't need your sarcasm. Listen dude, I asked you earlier today to chill out, stop being negative, and stop attacking people for their views. You don't seem to be able to have a discussion without attacking and criticizing everyone and you don't have the experience in this industry to be passing judgment on every entity you come across.

As I said earlier, if you would like to share your experiences we'd be happy to hear them. If you'd like to pass judgment, be sarcastic, be negative, and attack everyone please go elsewhere.

Daniel B.'s Comment
member avatar

There always has to be one coo-coo-head on the forum it seems.

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