Best Offer?

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Bucket's Comment
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I've ask several general questions and received great info. After sending out numerous applications I got this offer. Thank you for your interest in joining the team. At this time we are hiring for regional in your zip. We have no local or dedicated runs available, however if something comes available while you are with us you have the opportunity to move into one of those positions. With over 2,600 tractors and over 8,000 trailers. Dry van carrier, about 90% no touch freight, 60% drop and hook. Paid on dispatched miles, no waiting for paperwork to be processed. 1. Students 7,500 miles minimum with finisher - $0.26 per mile then upgrade to company truck and earn $0.31. 2. 60,000 miles - $.33 per mile 3. 90,000 miles - $.35 per mile 4. 120,000 miles - $.38 per mile 5. .03 cpm for Hazmat Loads Weekly average miles regional Drivers: 1800-2200 Tuition reimbursement up to $4,000 over 12 months Free Rider Program for anyone over 12 years old. Pet Program 1 dog or cat per person in the truck, $500 non-refundable pet fee. Paid Vacation after 1 year, 6 Paid Holidays $60 a day, Guaranteed Christmas Day home Free XM Radio, GPS, Power Inverters, E-Logs, PrePass for Tolls, 65mph Governed, 24 Hour Road Service, Well Maintained, Newer Model Equipment,ยท Dispatched Home in Your Truck.

How does that sound for a rookie? Guess I could get more if I was willing to do otr.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

Dedicated Run:

A driver or carrier who transports cargo between regular, prescribed routes. Normally it means a driver will be dedicated to working for one particular customer like Walmart or Home Depot and they will only haul freight for that customer. You'll often hear drivers say something like, "I'm on the Walmart dedicated account."

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Drop And Hook:

Drop and hook means the driver will drop one trailer and hook to another one.

In order to speed up the pickup and delivery process a driver may be instructed to drop their empty trailer and hook to one that is already loaded, or drop their loaded trailer and hook to one that is already empty. That way the driver will not have to wait for a trailer to be loaded or unloaded.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Old School's Comment
member avatar
Great Answer!

Bucket, I don't think you really understand what regional means. I serve a regional position that puts me in something like thirty eight states - it is a large region, but it is still regional - we just don't hit the far Western states.

I know you have all your reasons for choosing what you want, but you will serve your interests much better by taking an over the road job and committing to it for one year, then let yourself be all picky and choosy about how you want to do this. Not only are you limiting yourself incredibly by the way you are going about this, but you are most likely setting yourself up for a difficult path that could end your career in the first three months because of the difficulties of some of the types of jobs that may be available to you as a rookie.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Over The Road:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Old School's Comment
member avatar
Great Answer!
Eckoh would you please give me a list of company's hiring in zip 73521, students for dry van , with 34 reset at home, over .40 cpm.

Bucket, you are making a classic rookie blunder in your job search. Your acting like the red carpet should be rolled out for you just because you have a CDL. I hope I am wrong about you, but I've seen this so many times it is disturbing. You're wanting to get paid like your an experienced driver, and you want to be home every weekend - more like you are demanding it, by not taking these jobs that don't go that way. I'm just warning you that nine times out of ten, folks who come into this with your approach fail miserably.

Eckoh doesn't need to be doing your leg work for you when you can put your zip code into our own system when you Apply For Truck Driving Jobs.

Again, I understand you have your reasons, and I completely respect that, but they are not based on a realistically successful approach to entering this field as a rookie driver.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

I don't see the name of the company here. Do you have that?

Bucket's Comment
member avatar

I don't see the name of the company here. Do you have that?

I don't see the name of the company here. Do you have that?

ErroI sent you a PM

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

I only know about Swift. I can't really compare things, that's up to you. Getting the details out for everyone will help others help you.

I believe you PM'd me to say this offer is from XPO.

Bucket's Comment
member avatar

Yes, XPO sent me a very detailed offer. Werner has a very similar over the phone offer. I've decided to wait until I've heard from the visiting recruiters at school. Biggest difference is Werner has home for two days every other week and XPO has 34 hour reset. Training : Werner solo to start then team for 275 hours behind the wheel. I don't have an average miles per week from Werner, or pay increase. Miricleofmagic that drives for Werner has given me great info. (MOM sorry if I misspelled your handle)

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
member avatar

Well.. take into consideration that regional is just like otr..... just in certain areas. My bf who is regional does not get home any more often than the 4 days per month I do otr. . We r both company for different companies and he drives hazmat.

As far as pay and miles...as a rookie I get more at prime. I have the larger truck and get 39.5 cpm.... the lightweights get 44.5 cpm. I also get average about 2500 miles per week with my moat at 2900.... I've been solo since valentine's day. I don't get the paid holidays... but was told I could pick either thanksgiving or Christmas to be home. I get dispatched home in my truck on time with 2 weeks notice. And anywhere i want. Last month i took it in NJ this month i took home time in NC. I have a 1 yr old fabulous cascadia I love it and any problems are fixed when I bring them up. My pet fee was 1000 dollars... I'm governed at 62 mph...I have free pre pass which is for the weigh stations nit the tolls... free ez pass for tolls....and free gps. My health insurance I think is 60 per week but drops to 22 per week once u hit one year.

Other things I love about Prime are the terminals. The main one is amazing with indoor basketball courts a gym... day care.. an awesome cafe.. pool tables and more. Every holiday they are doing something special. Plus we get decent bonuses for fuel mileage recruiting accident free and even just scanning our paperwork gives us reward points to use in the company store.

Plus I love the other drivers. I can ask any prime driver in the terminal or otr questions and have a list of phone numbers for experienced drivers.

As far as school...they advanced 200 per week to be paid back once u pass test. .. I did 3 weeks driving with a trainer with my permit... I did all driving and did 10k miles. Once i passed my cdl I went team with a trainer for 30k miles. (I personally hate teaming and this was the most dufficult part for me) Then I upgraded to solo. I paid only $155 for my permit and processing....I only pay for school if I don't stay one year. No intention of leaving. I did pay for TWIC card 160. Sleep apnea 500. Chains and load locks 600. All that they take out in increments.

The company over all has been great to me. Any problems are handled. It depends what is important to you. You should ask what regional means to them and if it means the same to you. Does regional or otr matter if you are getting the same amount of hometime?

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Sleep Apnea:

A physical disorder in which you have pauses in your breathing, or take shallow breaths, during sleep. These pauses can last anywhere from a few seconds to a few minutes. Normal breathing will usually resume, sometimes with a loud choking sound or snort.

In obstructive sleep apnea, your airways become blocked or collapse during sleep, causing the pauses and shallow breathing.

It is a chronic condition that will require ongoing management. It affects about 18 million people in the U.S.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Bucket, both of the break times you mentioned are standard. The one day off per week of driving is the same as Rainy's 4 days per month. "34 hours off" is a FMCSA rule to reset your clocks. It's what I get every weekend (plus some extra time as scheduled).

CSA:

Compliance, Safety, Accountability (CSA)

The CSA is a Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) initiative to improve large truck and bus safety and ultimately reduce crashes, injuries, and fatalities that are related to commercial motor vehicle

FMCSA:

Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration

The FMCSA was established within the Department of Transportation on January 1, 2000. Their primary mission is to prevent commercial motor vehicle-related fatalities and injuries.

What Does The FMCSA Do?

  • Commercial Drivers' Licenses
  • Data and Analysis
  • Regulatory Compliance and Enforcement
  • Research and Technology
  • Safety Assistance
  • Support and Information Sharing

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Eckoh's Comment
member avatar

The cpm seems low imo even for a new driver. There are a number of companies now that offer even 0 experience drivers over 40 cpm.

The only way wages will go up is if people stop hiring on to places that don't pay a decent wage.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Bucket's Comment
member avatar

I'm finding picking the right company is a tough decision. Originally I thought finding the best school was difficult, but turns out that was easy. Home time is very important, prefer weekly but will accept every other. My location is another obstacle, Averitt requires trucks to be parked at terminal , closest is about one fifty. Prime only has reefer for my zip, plus expect to be out three weeks or more. Schneider only has team, that's OTR , dedicated, or regional. Swift, Crete, US Express, National and several others all are out the three weeks or more. All local are flatbed or at least nine months OTR experience. That pretty much leaves XPO, or Werner for now. XPO does sponsor for the school I've chosen. As for now since I've made arrangements to pay for training I'm going to go with it. The school has several recruiters that only speak to students that are not being sponsored. This leaves my options open, one never knows what the recruiters might have to offer.

At least I'm getting offers. I thought for a while I was stuck with being out three weeks or team. This site is so awesome, although you can't make my decisions, I see the decisions everyone has made. Its great to know very few regret that decision. Of course I'm going on the assumption the company I chose, I can also meet their requirements.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Eckoh's Comment
member avatar

I'm finding picking the right company is a tough decision. Originally I thought finding the best school was difficult, but turns out that was easy. Home time is very important, prefer weekly but will accept every other. My location is another obstacle, Averitt requires trucks to be parked at terminal , closest is about one fifty. Prime only has reefer for my zip, plus expect to be out three weeks or more. Schneider only has team, that's OTR , dedicated, or regional. Swift, Crete, US Express, National and several others all are out the three weeks or more. All local are flatbed or at least nine months OTR experience. That pretty much leaves XPO, or Werner for now. XPO does sponsor for the school I've chosen. As for now since I've made arrangements to pay for training I'm going to go with it. The school has several recruiters that only speak to students that are not being sponsored. This leaves my options open, one never knows what the recruiters might have to offer.

At least I'm getting offers. I thought for a while I was stuck with being out three weeks or team. This site is so awesome, although you can't make my decisions, I see the decisions everyone has made. Its great to know very few regret that decision. Of course I'm going on the assumption the company I chose, I can also meet their requirements.

honestly with OTR you need to stay out 3+ weeks to make money. Especially with companies that do not allow inverters and what not to run things like a fridge or an microwave. Living on the road is costly. Not to mention wanting home weekly will make it near impossible to get good miles.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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